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Histories:  Trempealeau Co. Historical Accounts:

"History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881":

Biographical Sketches of Trempealeau Residents

-As transcribed from pages 1045 - 1051

ADAMS, Leonard W.
ATWOOD, Frank
BARR, Samuel
BARRETT, James M.
BELL, Anson
BOHRNSTEDT, John
BONUM, Daniel S.
BOOHER, William T.
BRANDENBERG, Alpheus N.
BURNS, William T.
CARHART, Andrew R.
CLEVELAN, Charles J.
CLEVELAND, John
COOK, Rev. N.

CUMMINGS, William L.
CURTIS, John
ELKINS, Edwin
FLEMINGTON, Alex. B.
GILFILLAN, Daniel W.
GOODHUE, F. A.
HANKEY, E. J.
HARE, Lemuel I.

HARRIS, Abner
HELLER, Henry
HEUSTON, Benjamin F.
HOBERTON, Herman
HOUGHTON, Silas E.

JOHNSON, Almon
JOHNSON, Wilson
KRIBS, Paul
McDONAH, William
NEWMAN, Hon. Alford William
OWEN, Thomas G.
PIERSON, Jacob H.
PITTENGER, Abraham
PORTER, Langdon
RIEMENSCHNEIDER, Christian
RUDOLPH, Henry
SEYMOUR, Thomas J.
SHOWERS, William J.
SIEWERT, William
TROWBRIDGE, Edward N.
WASON, Daniel C.
WRIGHT, Hollister



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

LEONARD W. ADAMS, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Trempealeau; was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., on the 11th of January, 1831; came to Wisconsin in 1855, first settling in the town of Union, Rock Co., where he remained engaged at farming until 1859, then went back to New York, and, after staying there for four years, returned and bought the farm where he now lives, and, in 1864, moved on to it; he has been a member of the Board of Supervisors, and was married in the year 1870 to Miss Mary Electa Blake, of Rock County, but formerly of New York; their family consists of three children-Bessie C., Hattie M. and Charles B.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," pages 1045 - 1046

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FRANK ATWOOD, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Centerville; was born in Vermont Nov. 17, 1840; he came to Wisconsin with his brother Almon in the year 1848, locating in Fond du Lac Co., where the subject of this sketch remained until 1859, at which time he removed to Trempealeau Co., and purchased the farm where he now lives; he is a member of the Riverside Grange, and also of the Farmers' Alliance at Galesville. He was married, in 1862, to Betsey Holbrook, of Trempealeau Co.; they have seven children-Nellie, Emily, Laura, Angie, Lucy, Willie and Bertha.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1046

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SAMUEL BARR, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Trempealeau; was born in New York State, Madison Co., March 18, 1818; leaving there in June of 1842, he came to Wisconsin, near Whitewater, where he pre-empted a claim from the Government; in 1856, removed to Trempealeau Co., and bought his present farm; now has two creameries, keeping sixteen cows; he has been a member of the Trempealeau Town Board. Was married in Dodge Co., in 1856, to Miss Caroline Lily, a native of New York State, by whom he has seven children-Eliza I., Ira A., Clara, Ervin R., Bessie, Ella and Rosa M.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1046

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JAMES M. BARRETT, retired merchant, Trempealeau; came to that village in 1856 in the interest of a Pittsburgh lumbering company, to erect a mill for the purpose of manufacturing lumber, etc.; after spending about $25,000, the enterprise finally became a failure, and the other members of the party, with the exception of John King and James Barrett, returned to their homes in the East; the subject of this sketch becoming interested in the welfare of the town and county, concluded to make his home in the West, and, in 1857, was elected Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of the town and also of the county, and immediately commenced laying out roads, and constructing bridges across the Trempealeau River, and, in the spring of 1857, built the first steamboat dock at Trempealeau, which is still in use as the main landing; in 1858, started in the merchandise trade in company with Abner Harris, their business also embracing grain dealing, and, in the fall of the same year, shipped their first wheat on the Mississippi, it being the first wheat ever sent from Trempealeau; Mr. Barrett afterward discontinued the grain business, but continued as a merchant until 1862, then engaged in the lumber trade; he had previously bought and sold the first lumber raft at Trempealeau; he also had, in connection with his lumber business, a line of agricultural implements and wagons, running them together until 1877, when he abandoned the lumber trade, and is now machinist in connection with his farming; he has held the office of Justice of the Peace in Trempealeau for fifteen years, and was elected to the Legislature for the year 1878; has also been connected with the School Board continually, and is a member of the Baptist Church, being the means of establishing that society at Trempealeau. James Barrett was born in New Hampshire April 13, 1835, and was married in Orleans Co., N. Y., to Miss Johanna Harris, a native of that State, in 1853.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1046

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ANSON BELL, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Centerville; was born in Medina Co., Ohio, April 9, 1818. He first came to Wisconsin in the year 1837, and bought a farm from the Government in Walworth County. He remained but a short time and returned to Ohio, but in 1839, brought his family with him and settled on his farm; in 1855, he removed to La Crosse County upon a farm in the town of Amsterdam, on which he lived until 1864, at which time came to Trempealeau County and bought the farm on which he now lives, first erecting a log cabin; he was married in Gilford, Ohio, on the 2d of February, 1842, to Eliza Chapman, whose parents were also very early settlers in this State. They have had seven children, five of whom are living-Leroy, Alice, now Mrs. William Bartholomew, Ida, now Mrs. William Rich. Orvill P., Willis A.; Sarah and Harrison B. both died in the same month in La Crosse County of diphtheria; Mr. Bell held the office of Town Treasurer, also Assessor in the town of Amsterdam, La Crosse Co., and was at one time Mail Agent between Racine and Janesville.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1046

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JOHN BOHRNSTEDT, farmer; Sec. 2; P. O. Trempealeau; was born in Germany, April 24, 1833; he lived with his parents until 1826, when they all came to America, first living in Milwaukee for nearly a year, and then removing to Trempealeau County. Here the subject of this sketch worked for Mr. Healey on a farm for three and one-half years, when he enlisted in Co. C, 30th Wis. V. I., serving until the close of the war; he then returned to Trempealeau County, and in 1866, bought the farm on which he lives. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812. John Bohrnstedt was married in 1863, to Mary Frohmeder, a native of New York State, whose parents, Laurence and Margaret Frohmeder, were natives of Germany, but settled in Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1841. Mr. Bohrnstedt's family now consists of four children - George W., Henry L., William C. and Albert.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1046

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DANIEL S. BONUM, farmer; Sec. 29, P. O. Centerville; came to Wisconsin in 1847, and first settled in the town of Lowell, Dodge Co., remaining there until 1856; he then removed to Trempealeau County and bought a farm, on which he lived until 1858, at which time he lost his wife; returned to Dodge County, where he lived one year, and at the time of the great mining excitement, went the overland route to California; returning to this State in 1862, and moved to his farm in Trempealeau County, having since made that his home. The subject of this sketch was born in Pennsylvania, Feb. 5, 1816; his father was of Scotch and his mother of French extraction. He has three children-Alva H., Alice L. and Elizabeth; has been a member of the Town Board of Trempealeau. There was an old Indian trail which crossed his farm from northeast to southwest, leading from the Trempealeau mountain to the Big Tamarack, and there have also been found on his place several pieces of ancient pottery.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1046

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WILLIAM T. BOOHER, Notary Public and collecting and insurance agent, Trempealeau; was born in Kalamazoo, Mich., Sept. 8, 1834; came to La Crosse in 1854, and in 1855, to Trempealeau, in company with his brother, J. H. Booher, where they started a store, dealing largely with the Indians. For several years they had a trade on Sundays of from $200 to $600. He finally sold out his store, but still lives in Trempealeau, having held several offices in the town, and being now Notary Public; he is also general collecting and insurance agent, and agent for the Cunard and Inman lines of ocean steamers.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1046

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ALPHEUS N. BRANDENBERG, farmer, P. O. Trempealeau; was born in the town of Frederick, Md., Sept. 18, 1814; his parents moved to Dayton, Ohio, when he was but six months old, and here he remained until twenty-six years of age, and was married there April 21, 1836, to Miss Catherine Sclutman, who was born Oct. 15, 1815, in Montgomery Co., Ohio; in 1840, they went to Iowa, where he took up a claim from the Government, situated fourteen miles southwest of Muscatine; on this he lived until 1849, at which time he moved into Muscatine and started a grocery and provision store, where he continued until 1852, and then put his goods on board a boat and brought them up the river to Trempealeau, then called Montoville, where he landed the 3d day of November, 1852. He immediately opened a store, which was the third one in the village, and in the spring of 1853, went into partnership with N. B. Grover, and continued with him until 1855, when he sold out to his partner, and was appointed Sheriff of Trempealeau County, he being the first man who served in that office, and called the first court in that county. The first town meeting was held in Mr. Brandenburg's store, in the spring of 1853. His family consists of five children - Elizabeth E., now Mrs. A. Grover, Mary A. S., Catherine A. M., now Mrs. Ed. Elkins, Thaddeus A. and Nathaniel O. They have lost one son - William H. H., who died March 29, 1852.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1046

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WILLIAM T. BURNS, farmer, Sec. 1, P. O. Trempealeau, was born in Essex Co., N. Y., July 20, 1824. He settled in Trempealeau Co. in 1855, on a farm which he purchased from the Government, consisting originally of 120 acres. He has added to it until he now owns 610 acres in one body. He has been a member of the Town Board of Trempealeau, and of the Methodist Church, for twenty years. He was married in New York in 1847, to Miss Louisa Bugbee, who was a native of that State. They have but one child, a son, Delbert C.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," pages 1046 - 1047

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ANDREW R. CARHART, farmer, Sec. 6, P. O. Trempealeau, is a native of New York and was born Dec. 31, 1841. In 1852 he came to Wisconsin, where he farmed in Dodge Co., at Fox Lake, with his father, Isaac D. Carhart, and with whom he made his home until 1865, when he started to farming for himself. He was married the same year to Jennie H. Hope, she being a daughter of John Gillies, of Trempealeau. In the year 1878 he moved on to his present farm, and now owns 230 acres of good farm land. During the years 1868-70 he was engaged in the pork-packing and grocery business in the village of Trempealeau, and has been a member of the Village Board for two terms and also the Town Board; himself and wife have been members of the Congregational Church of Trempealeau for fifteen years. Mr. Carhart has been President of the Trempealeau Co. Agricultural Society for two years. They have had three children, two of whom are living-Edward A. and Allen R.; the one who died was named George W.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1047

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CHARLES J. CLEVELAN, farmer, Sec. 9, P. O. Trempealeau, was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., Nov. 18, 1823. He came to Wisconsin in 1835, with his uncle, Quartis G. Corleg, landing at Milwaukee, where they remained some time. After leaving Milwaukee he went to Pine Grove, where his father was, and remained there until 1841. His father then sold out and went to Texas; returning in the fall of 1842, he settled in the town of Kenosha, where Charles J. remained until 1852. He then went up Black River to the Falls, and in 1853 went to Clark Co., where he was engaged extensively in trying to establish the county seat at Neillsville. He was also farming, and, in 1855, moved to North Bend, Jackson Co., where he was engaged in a saw-mill. In 1857 he came to Trempealeau Co., first living in the village by that name for two years, then moving to the town of Dodge in 1859. He was still there when the war broke out, and in February, 1865, he enlisted in Co. K, 46th W. V. I., serving until the close of the war, after which he returned home, and in 1877 moved back to Trempealeau Co., near where he now lives.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1047

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JOHN CLEVELAND, carpenter and builder, Trempealeau was born in New Brunswick, Canada, Aug. 9, 1814. Remained in his native country until 1848, when he moved to Cincinnati, where he made his home for seven years, and then returned to New Brunswick, living in the city of St. John for three years; in 1858, went to St. Louis, where he worked at ship-carpentering for three years, and in 1861 came North, and located in Trempealeau County. Here he farmed for three years, afterward moving into the village of Trempealeau, where he worked at carpentering and building. Mr. Cleveland was married in St. John, New Brunswick, to Miss Mary E. Morse in the year 1837; she was a native of that city. They are both active members of the Baptist Church at Trempealeau. Their family consists of five children - Sanford B.; Annie, now Mrs. J. Shaw; Jennie, now Mrs. Peter Bidwell, of North McGregor, Iowa; William M., of St. Paul, connected with the music house of Dyer & Howard, and Nettie M.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1047

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REV. N. COOK, farmer on Sec. 13, P. O. Trempealeau, was born in New York, March 5, 1817. The early part of his life was spent at stave-making, and he worked at that until he came to Wisconsin, which was in the year 1844. He first located in Walworth County, where he bought a farm from the Government, their market-place being Milwaukee or Racine. He also preached more or less in the Wesleyan Methodist pulpit, having been ordained Elder by President McKee; in 1852, he moved to Trempealeau, on the farm where he now lives, which was land that his father entered as a land-warrant for his service in the war of 1812; his grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Mr. Cook has improved his farm, until he has now one of the best in the county. He has been a worker in the cause of Christ for over thirty years; his present wife is also a very old settler in Trempealeau, being the widow of Joseph Chase, who died Nov. 30, 1869; in March, 1879, an old settler had lost his wife, and as his children were all married, and he had been acquainted with the widow a number of years, he thought it advisable to marry her. After talking to his children about it, and finding they were willing, he was married to the widow July 6, 1879. The boys in that part of the country were in the habit of "charivariing," and on the evening of the day after the marriage, a charivari was given in earnest, by the firing of guns, breaking of windows and doors, and the using of profane language; the crowd finally exclaimed that they were going to drag the groom out; he went among them and asked what they wanted. Their response was that he could have his choice of two things-paying $10 or being tarred and feathered and ridden on a rail. He asked them what they wanted the money for, and they said for something to drink; his reply was: "You know I am a strong temperance man, and although I am at the mercy of 150 men, I will not grant your request; you can walk over my dead body, but you cannot subdue my principles." He was then seized by the mob, and dragged and knocked around till senseless, after which he was carried into the house, and the crowd dispersed. It was doubtful for many days whether he would recover, but he finally did.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1047

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WILLIAM L. CUMMINGS, farmer, Sec. 16, P. O. Trempealeau, was born in Bloomfield, Walworth Co., Wis., Sept. 7, 1848; is the son of Israel P. Cummings, one of the early settlers of that that county, who came from Massachusetts in 1844, removing from there to Waushara County in 1852, where he farmed for three years, and from there to Clark County, where he engaged in the lumber business, and was the second resident in the town of Weston, it that county, remaining there until 1861; while there, Israel P. killed 128 deer, and his wife, with a child in her arms, was lost in the woods in a snow storm, being found by the Indians all safe, but very much frightened. They then moved to Trempealeau County, settling on a farm in the town of Lincoln. The subject of this sketch received a common school education, and afterward attended the Galesville University for six terms, after which he began teaching--first in Whitehall, then at Arcadia and a number of other schools, until he commenced farming. He was married, in 1873, to Miss Addie Bunn, in Trempealeau County, she being a niece of Judge Bunn, of Madison.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1047

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JOHN CURTIS, farmer, Sec. 6, P. O. Marshland, Buffalo Co., was born in Tioga Co., N. Y., Jan. 5, 1838; came to Wisconsin, with his parents, in 1846, first locating in Dodge County, where his father still resides; here he lived until 1871, when he moved to Trempealeau County, on the farm where he now lives. He enlisted in the 1st Wis. Battery, at La Crosse, in 1861, and served until the close of the war. Was married, in 1867, to Alzoa Kidder, of Dodge County. They have five children - Emma A., Alanson, Archie R., Clyde C. and John.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1047

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EDWIN ELKINS, carpenter and builder, Trempealeau, was born in Seneca Co., N. Y., Nov. 26, 1837. He came to the village of Trempealeau in 1857, where he was engaged in a sawmill. In 1861 he enlisted in Co. D, 14th W. V. I., and served until the close of the war, being promoted to First Lieutenant December, 1864. He then returned to Trempealeau and was elected to the office of County Sheriff for the years 1868-69. He has since been elected to various town offices in Trempealeau, and has been Town Treasurer for six years.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1047

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ALEX. B. FLEMINGTON, farmer, Sec. 17, P. O. Trempealeau; was born in Scotland on the 31st of May, 1826. He came to America in 1844, remaining four years in Rhode Island, where he was engaged in a calico manufactory. He came to Milwaukee in 1844, working there in a carriage manufactory, and remaining five years. He afterward went to Harte Prairie, where he stayed until 1854, when he came to Trempealeau County and bought the land on which he now lives. He returned to Harte Prairie, but only remained a short time, after which he came again to Trempealeau County and settled on his farm, on which he has since lived. There is an old Indian mound on his place, which joins the field that was used by the old Catholic mission to the Indians. He was married in Milwaukee, August 20, 1851, to Miss Mary Taylor, who is also a native of Scotland.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," pages 1047 - 1048

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DANIEL W. GILFILLAN, farmer, Section 16, P. O. Trempealeau; was born in the State of Vermont, December 19, 1825. He received a common school education, afterward attending the Vermont University at Burlington, where he graduated when twenty-two years of age. He then went to Ohio, where he engaged at teaching, principally at Wilmington and Xenia, where he was Principal. In 1852 came to Wisconsin, lived in La Crosse one year, and then moving to Minnesota, where he lived for three years. In 1856 he returned to Wisconsin and commenced keeping a hotel in the village of Trempealeau, known as the Vermont House, which he ran until 1860, being at the same time School Superintendent under the old system. After leaving the hotel he taught more or less until 1873, and was at one time School Superintendent of Trempealeau County for three years, and was also Clerk of the Town Board for one year. Is also connected with the Bible Society, of which he is now Secretary. Was married in 1850 to Helen S. Partridge, in Vermont, she being a native of that State.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1048

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F. A. GOODHUE, of the firm of F. A. Goodhue & Son, dealers in books, stationery and furniture, is the son of Thomas and Sarah Goodhue, having been born in Vermont, January 15, 1821. He first came to Wisconsin in the year 1856, where he worked at his trade, that of millwright, for one year in La Crosse, and afterward went up Black River to Robinson Creek and worked in what was then known as the Pettinbone Mill. In 1858 he came to Trempealeau and worked at his trade and carpentering until 1879, when he started in his present business. He has been a member of the Village Board of Trempealeau. He was married in New York, in the year 1852, to Miss Alzina Manning, a native of Canada. They have three children, Edwin F., Elbert N., Alletta.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1048

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E. J. HANKEY, general merchandise, Trempealeau; was born in Germany, Nov. 17, 1844. In 1854 he came to America, and located first at Beaver Dam, Wis., where he followed his trade, that of cabinet-making, and clerked until 1868, when he came to Trempealeau. Here he started a small grocery and provision store in company with Thomas Veltum, in the building which now stands opposite R1. W. Russell's store. They continued business under the firm name of Hankey & Veltum for three and one-half years, when Mr. Hankey sold out to his partner and left Trempealeau for a little more than a year. Upon returning he entered into business with his former partner, increasing their stock, and in 1876 moved into what is known as the Healey Brick Block. He continued in this partnership until 1878, when he bought out the establishment. He does a jewelry business of $27,000. He has held the office of Town Clerk in his village for six years.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1048

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ABNER HARRIS, retired merchant, Trempealeau, is quite an old settler in Trempealeau, having come there in 1859. He was born in New York, Sept. 24, 1819, and first came to Wisconsin with his brother, in the spring of 1848, but only stayed here in Dane County for a short time and then went back to New York. In 1855, he returned to Wisconsin and worked with his brother at the carpenter and joiner's trade in Dane County; continued at this for three years, when he began buying wheat. He afterward moved to Spring Green, in Sauk County. In 1859, came to Trempealeau, where he started a general merchandise store, in company with J. M. Borratt, in the brick block then known as Noyce and James' Block, but which has since tumbled down. Was married in 1860 to Miss Anna D. Doud, she being the daughter of Chauncey and Sarah Doud, who came to Trempealeau in 1857.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1048

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LEMUEL I. HARE, farmer, Sec., 35, P. O. Trempealeau; was born Feb. 19, 1829, in Clinton Co., New York. In 1856 he came to La Crosse Co., Wis., where he bought a farm and lived for a number of years, holding the office of Constable a part of the time. In 1865 moved to Trempealeau County, where he purchased a farm, which was originally bought from the Government by Leander Bilboe. The Indian trail which ran from Trempealeau Mountain to the Little Tamarack, in 1835, passed a little west of Mr. Hare's house. He also held the office of Constable in the county. He was married in New York, Jan. 1, 1855, to Miss Eliza Cary, who was a native of that State, and whose grandmother's name was Scott, a second cousin to General Scott. They have eight children - Freeman S., Emmit M., Lottie, Willie P., Effie E., Alta G., Elizabeth and Lemuel W.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1048

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HENRY HELLER, grain warehouse, etc., Trempealeau, was born in Germany Dec. 4, 1845. In the year 1866, he came to America, arriving in Trempealeau, Wis., in 1867, and became engaged with Riemenschneider, buying wheat. In 1870, he built the house where he now lives and kept boarders until 1873. He then built a warehouse and has been engaged at buying grain, etc., ever since, having handled as much as 30,000 bushels of grain in a year. Mr. Heller is now President of the Town Board of Trempealeau, and is also a member of the A., F. & A. M. Trempealeau Lodge, No. 117.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1048

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BENJAMIN F. HEUSTON, mail agent on the Green Bay & Minnesota Railroad, Trempealeau, was born in New Jersey, March 8, 1823, being the youngest son of Paul and Naomi Heuston, whose maiden name was Cox. The father moved to Warren County, Ohio in 1829, where his remains now lie interred in the burial grounds of the "Orthodox Friends," at Waynesville. The subject of this sketch taught school when nineteen years of age, and passed the winters of 1843-44 teaching near Rodney, Miss. Spent his twenty-first birthday stemming the current of the Upper Mississippi, and afterward passed some time in the lead mines near Galena, then came up river on the steamer Otter, landing at La Crosse in September, of 1844, and going directly to the Black River Pineries, where he remained seven years; was here elected Justice of the Peace in 1846, and the same year heard William T. Price deliver his first Fourth of July oration. On that occasion, after the toast had been drank, the hilarity of some of those present became so perverted that a fight ensued, which led to the thought of a temperance reformation, in which Mr. Heuston, in connection with William T. Price, John Valentine and James O'Neil took an active part, and a large portion of the inhabitants signed the pledge. About the same time, he became active in a movement to procure a preacher for the community. A meeting was called, a subscription circulated, the denomination named, and Heuston, Price and Valentine were appointed a committee to carry out the plan. The preacher in charge of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Prairie du Chien was addressed, bringing a response from Rev. Alfred Bronson, followed by the advent of Rev. R. R. Wood, he being the first preacher on Black River. Heuston was the first Town Clerk in the precinct where Neillsville now is, and, as a Justice of the Peace, assisted later at Black River Falls in county canvass of the votes cast for the first county officers of La Crosse County. In the fall of 1851, entered in partnership with Ira Hammond to purchase a piece of land at James Reed's Landing (now Trempealeau) with the object of building a warehouse, and to found a village. Began work at once erecting the cellar walls before winter, and finished the building the next summer. The firm were joint proprietors with James Reed in laying out the village of Montoville (now Trempealeau), Heuston becoming Postmaster, being the first one in the county. On the 1st of February, 1853, he was married in Montoville to Miss Catherine A. Davidson, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, daughter of the Rev. Hugh Davidson, one of the early settlers of Walworth County. At the close of the same year, moved to a farm near the present village of Galesville, and, on the organization of the town of Gale, became Chairman of the Board of Supervisors and Justice of the Peace. At the first meeting of the Trempealeau County Board, Mr. Heuston was elected its Chairman, and was also the first County Judge of said county, which office, after a re-election, he resigned in 1860 to visit Eastern cities with reference to an educational design concerning object-lessons in colors; returned the same year from New York to Chicago, and there engaged in a wholesale fruit store, where, being impressed by the immense loss of fruit and butter from careless handling of commission merchants, conceived the idea of refrigerator cars, and the personal branding of packages. Selecting the department of butter and cheese for a test of his scheme, procured the promise of a refrigerator car (then unknown in Chicago) for the Fox River Valley Railroad, and canvassed among the farmers of Northeastern Illinois and some in Wisconsin for farmers' co-operation in the scheme. The farmers, then by a clear majority, had little faith in the success of butter-making in Illinois, declaring that good butter could not be made there, in the very regions since renowned for butter and cheese factories. This scheme, however, was summarily terminated by the breaking-out of the war. In August, of 1863, Mr. Heuston enlisted at Geneva, Wis., in Company C, 22d W. V. I., his family returning to the farm at Galesville. As a Corporal and Color-guard, he was wounded in 1864, and began the "march to the sea," with his arm in a sling. At the close of the war, he returned to his farm, and, in the spring following, was elected Town Collector, and the next fall County Clerk and Clerk of the Court. In November, of 1871, was appointed "Mail Route Agent," in which capacity he now serves on the G. B. & M. R. R. At an old settler's meeting in 1871, he read a paper on the early history of Trempealeau County, which included accurate details of the achievements previous to 1856. This was ordered printed and filed, and he was made Chairman of the permanent organization. In 1879, he printed and copyrighted a pamphlet entitled "General Alphabet," and has written various articles for the press; some on politics and travel, but mostly on Temperance Reform. Mr. Heuston has three children - George Z., Benjamin F., Jr., and Elizabeth A.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," pages 1048 - 1049

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HERMAN HOBERTON, proprietor of the Trempealeau Wagon Works, came to America in 1854, having been born in Prussia May 22, 1841; first located with his parents in Fond du Lac Co., where he lived four years, and then went to Dodge Co., where he learned the trade of wagon-making; afterwards traveled in various places, being in Iowa part of the time, but finally settled down in Trempealeau in 1863; he started a wagon-shop, which he is still running, and does a very good business. Mr. Hoberton has been a member of the Village Board of Trempealeau; also one of the Trustees of the village graded school for four years, and is a member of the A., F. & A. M., Trempealeau Lodge, No. 117.
-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1049

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SILAS E. HOUGHTON, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Trempealeau; was born in Saratoga Co., N. Y., Sept. 17, 1836; was engaged at farming in his native State until 1865, when he came to Trempealeau Co., where he bought a farm from the Government; in the spring of 1866, he built a house on his land, which was destroyed by fire in 1867, after which he erected his present residence; there are several Indian mounds on his place, though none of them have been examined. Mr. Houghton has been Town Supervisor of Trempealeau. He was married in February, 1860, to Miss Melinda A. Clothier, a native of New York; they have six children - Denis L., Silas R., J. C., Dudley S., Ella E. and Leon L.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1049

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ALMON JOHNSON, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Centerville; was born in Ohio Oct. 21, 1819; he came to Columbia Co. in 1854, where he lived three years, and, in 1857, moved to Trempealeau, locating one mile east of Galesville, where he lived until 1867, when he moved on the farm where he now lives. He was married in the year 1845 to Miss Elizabeth Robinson, of Ohio, by whom he has had ten children, nine of whom are living - Leonard A., Edward R., Homer E., Franklin S., Mary I., William E., Chauncey N., Emma E. and Orrin M.; they lost their oldest son, Samuel A., who died at home March 7, 1872; he was a soldier in the 30th W. V. I., Co. C, in 1862, and served until the close of the war.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1049

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WILSON JOHNSON, retired farmer; P. O. Trempealeau; came to Wisconsin when only seventeen years of age, having been born in Parke Co., Ind., Aug. 17, 1829; he first lived in Shullsburg, La Fayette Co., working in the lead mines, driving team for two years, and, in 1849, moved to Jackson Co., Iowa, where he ran a ferry-boat at Bellevue; continued in this business until 1854; then farmed until 1857, at which time he moved up the Mississippi River to Richmond, Minn., opposite the village of Trempealeau; he again commenced running a ferry-boat at Richmond, being the first ferry run at that place; in 1859, he moved across the river to Trempealeau, and, in 1863, started a grocery and provision store, which he run until 1870, when he was elected Constable, and appointed Deputy Sheriff under D. W. Wade, and also the next term under Joseph Kellogg; he is proprietor of what is known as the Noyce farm, and still holds the office of Constable. Was married in Jackson Co., Iowa, to Miss Lucinda Fulton in the year 1853, his wife being a native of Ohio.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1049

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PAUL KRIBS, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Trempealeau; was born in Canada Feb. 24, 1814; here he resided until the year 1851, when he came to the United States, first living in Elgin, Ill., where he worked at the carpenter and joiner trade until 1865, when he removed to Trempealeau Co., and bought the farm on which he now lives; he was Chairman of the Town Board of Trempealeau for one year, and was married, in 1838, to Miss Sarah A. Vanburan, she having been born in New York Dec. 7, 1816; their family consists of eight children - David H., John G., Louis W., Aaron, Mary C. (now Mrs. C. C. Kribs), Sarah A. (now Mrs. Arthur Porter, of Oregon), Paul D. and Phillip G. Two of the sons, John and Aaron, were soldiers in the late war, the former serving nearly four years in the 8th 111. V. C., Co. I, being promoted to the position of Captain, and was wounded in the leg; the latter enlisted in the 58th Ill. V. I., and was wounded at the battle of Fort Donelson, also at Pittsburg Landing.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1049

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WILLIAM McDONAH, farmer, Sec. 27, P. O. Centerville; was born in Orleans Co., Vermont, Dec. 15, 1832. His father was of Scotch, and his mother of Irish descent; he came to Wisconsin when sixteen years of age, and first worked on a farm in Dodge Co. for James Gillfillan, remaining there for seven years; in 1855 he came to Trempealeau Co., where he bought a farm from the Government on Sec. 3; on this he lived until 1863, at which time he purchased the farm where he now lives. There are a number of Indian mounds on the place. Mr. McDonah is Chairman of the Town Board of Trempealeau; has also been side Supervisor and a member of his district School Board for nine years; he married Sarah A. Cusick, who was born in New York, and they have five children, three sons and two daughters.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1049

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THOMAS G. OWEN, minister of the Congregational Church, Trempealeau; was born in Champaign Co., Ohio, July 30, 1830; his parents moved to Illinois when he was but seven years of age, locating in McDonough Co., where he received a common school education. He commenced his ministerial service in the M. E. Church in 1858, being ordained Deacon at Hannibal, Mo., by Bishop Janes, and Elder by Bishop Ames in 1860, at Hudson, in the same State. Mr. Owen took charge of his first church in Illinois, where he remained only six months and was then transferred to St. Louis, remaining there for two years. The principal part of his work was in Missouri, until the rebellion, when he entered the service of the Christian Commission and came North, and has remained here ever since. In 1870 he left the Methodist Conference and united with the Congregational Church, and has been a minister of the Gospel in that church ever since. He was married in Bushnell, Ill., to Miss Isabell Provine, in the year 1858. She died in October, 1873. In 1874 he was again married to Margaret Cragg, who was born in England in 1839.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1049

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HON. ALFORD WILLIAM NEWMAN, Trempealeau Circuit Judge in and for the South Judicial Circuit; was born at Durham, Greene Co., N. Y., April 5, 1834. His parents resided on a farm near the village, where Judge Newman remained until he was twenty years of age, engaged in agricultural pursuits during the summer, and attending school in the winter. In 1854 he matriculated at Hamilton College, whence he graduated in 1857, and continued the study of law, which he had commenced while a collegeate. On Dec. 8, of the latter year, the Judge was examined at Albany and admitted to the bar, and in January, 1858, he came West, settling in Ahnapee, Kewaunee Co. After a two months sojourn here, he removed to Trempealeau, where he has since resided. In 1860 the subject of this sketch was elected Town Clerk and was subsequently appointed County Judge, which position he resigned in 1866, to accept the nomination of District Attorney. Being elected he served until 1876, meanwhile representing the county in the Assembly in 1863, and the District as Senator during 1868-69, when he resigned to take his place on the Circuit bench, to which he was elected the previous fall. Judge Newman was married August 15, 1860, to Miss Celia E. Humphrey and has two children living-a young lady and a son, the latter three years of age.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1050

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JACOB H. PIERSON, druggist, Trempealeau; was born in North Ireland, Sept. 25, 1824, and in 1849 came with his wife to Canada, where they lived until 1861; he was a graduate of Apothecary Hall, in Dublin in 1844, and there joined the Irish Constabulary, where he served five years, and had charge of John Mitchell while he was in jail at Killmauren. In 1861 Mr. Pierson came to Trempealeau, Wis., where he commenced farming, and in 1874 started a drug store in Trempealeau, it being the first regular drug store in the village. He also owns a large farm within one mile of the town, which he runs in connection with his store. He is a member of the Congregational Church and also of the A., F. & A. M., Trempealeau Lodge, No. 117.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1050

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ABRAHAM PITTENGER, farmer, Sec. 15, P. O. Trempealeau, was born in Jefferson Co., Ohio, May 24, 1802, where, after reaching manhood, he was engaged at farming and blacksmithing. In 1854 he came to Wisconsin and first located on Bright's Prairie, La Crosse Co., where he bought a farm of 160 acres from the Government, on which he lived until he moved to Trempealeau Co. There is now but one man older than Mr. Pittenger in Trempealeau Co. He has always taken an active part in the public interest of his region; has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for forty-six years, and was married in 1820, to Miss Ellen Furgeson, by whom he had ten children eight of whom are living. His wife was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and died in 1845 in Ohio. He was married, in 1849, to his second wife, Miss Lucy E. Barnes, who has had five children, two of whom are living. She is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1050

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LANGDON PORTER, farmer, Sec. 34, P. O. Centerville, was born in Medina Co., Ohio, Sept. 26, 1819. He came to Wisconsin in 1840, first locating in Walworth Co., where he took up a claim from the Government, having but $25 in his pocket. Here he remained until 1852, when he sold his farm and went to California and Oregon, at the time of the mining excitement. In 1855 he returned to Wisconsin, settling in La Crosse Co., where he resided until 1864, when he moved to Trempealeau Co., his present home. While in La Crosse Co., Mr. Porter was Chairman of the Town Board of Holland, and in this county has been Assessor and Side Supervisor; also holding the office of Town Chairman for one year. He was married in Walworth Co., in March, 1844, to Miss Eunice Wright, who was born in Washington Co., N. Y., Aug. 2, 1824, and with her parents came to this State in 1842. They have had five children, three of whom are living-Arthur A., Mary N. (now Mrs. William H. Gibson) and Francis A.; the two who died were-Jesse H., died in Walworth Co. in 1855, and Perry S. died in the same county, Oct. 22, 1855.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1050

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CHRISTIAN RIEMENSCHNEIDER, grain merchant, Trempealeau, was born in Germany July 24, 1826; came to America and first located in Milwaukee, Wis., where he was engaged in the commission business until 1862, when he moved to Trempealeau. He is agent for the Diamond Joe, and also the St. Louis and St. Paul, packet lines of steamboats on the Mississippi.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1050

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HENRY RUDOLPH, farmer and proprietor of the Trempealeau quarries, P. O. Trempealeau, was born in Hanover, Germany, Nov. 20, 1818, and there learned the trade of marblecutting; was engaged at work on the cathedral at Cologne. He came to the United States in June, 1849, and worked at his trade on several of the largest buildings in this country. In 1856 he came to Trempealeau Co., and took up a farm on the Black River, afterward going, back to Ohio. In 1861 he returned to this place and has made his home ever since in the village of Trempealeau, opening his quarries in 1863. He has furnished and cut building stone for Sparta, La Crosse, Winona and St. Paul. Mr. Rudolph was married in 1850, to Miss Anna Deubner, of Dayton, Ohio, who was born in Germany. They now have a family of five children-Katie, a teacher in Duluth ; Lilly (Mrs. W. J. Showers, of Trempealeau); Emma, also a school teacher at Duluth; Annie and Adolphus.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1050

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THOMAS J. SEYMOUR, dealer in staple and fancy groceries, Trempealeau, was born in Ohio, Oct. 11, 1842; came with his parents to Wisconsin in 1853, and lived with them on a farm in Trempealeau County until 1868, his father being one of the first settlers in the county. He then started out in the world for himself; first running a peanut stand on the street in the village of Trempealeau. In 1868 he opened his fruit store in a room 8 x 16, his stock consisting of fruits and confectionery; and in 1870, built the store room which he now occupies, and moved into it the same year, having gradually increased from a small stock to what it now is. Mr. Seymour has always taken an active part in the public interest of his town; he was married in 1863, in Rochester, to Miss Sophia C. White, a native of Vermont. They have two daughters, Nellie and Maud. Mr. Seymour is a member of the A., F. & A. M., Trempealeau Lodge, No. 117.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1050

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WILLIAM J. SHOWERS, Principal of the Trempealeau Graded School, was born in Mercer Co., Penn., Sept. 22, 1845. He is the son of Elias and Sarah A. Showers, and came with them to Wisconsin in 1854, where they settled in Dane County. Here he attended the public school until 1864, when he began to teach, his first school being at Cross Plains, Dane County. In the winters of 1865-66, he went to Iowa, where he attended the Marion Seminary, and afterward taught until the spring of 1868, when he was a student of the academy at Marshall, Dane County. After two years of study there, he entered the State Normal School at Whitewater, where he was graduated in 1873. In September of that year, he took charge of the Literary Department, in the Institution for the Blind, at Janesville, Wis., where he continued until that institution was burned down. In the fall of 1875, he was engaged as principal of the graded school at Trempealeau, which position he still occupies. Was married July 31, 1877, in Trempealeau, to Miss Lillian A. H. Rudolph, by whom he has two children, William C. B. and one son unnamed.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," pages 1050 - 1051

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WILLIAM SIEWERT, miller and farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Trempealeau; was born in Germany, Oct. 4, 1832. He came to the United States in 1852, first settling in Dodge Co., Wis., where he run a mill for eleven years. After this he came to Trempealeau County and bought the farm on which he now lives. He purchased his mill from Chauncy Payne; this mill having been erected by Payne & Halcomb in 1867, and situated on the Big Tamarack Creek. He was married in 1861, in Dodge County, his wife also being a native of Germany; they have seven children living--Julius, Charles, Louisa, William, Max, Matilda and Minnie. They have lost two children, August and Albert.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1051

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EDWARD N. TROWBRIDGE, Town Clerk, insurance and general collecting agent, Trempealeau, was born in Meadville, Penn., Dec. 25, 1834. He is the son of Daniel and Elizabeth Trowbridge and came with them to the West, first settling at Onalaska, Wis., where they lived until the spring of 1856, when they moved to Trempealeau County, on a farm. The subject of this sketch lived on the homestead until the breaking-out of the war. His father was killed by falling from a barn, and his mother was killed by a horse running away Oct. 1, 1859. In 1861, Mr. Trowbridge enlisted, serving for three years and six months in the 1st Wis. Light Artillery, in the Army of the Tennessee. When discharged, he returned to the old homestead and farmed until 1867, when he moved into the village of Trempealeau and taught school until 1873. He then went in company with J. M. Barnett in the merchandise business, and in 1879, opened the office of insurance and collecting agent, which he has followed ever since. He was elected to the office of Town Clerk in 1876, holding the office since that time. Has been a member of the Baptist Church at Trempealeau since its organization.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1051

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DANIEL C. WASON, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Centerville; was born in Washington Co., N. Y., Dec. 14, 1833, and came to Wisconsin in 1856, living in the village of Trempealeau for one year. In 1864, bought a farm, which was the one where he now lives. He has held the office of Town Supervisor for seven years. He was married. Sept. 28, 1861, to Rachael McDanah. They have three children - Alma E., Charles C. and George H.
-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1051

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HOLLISTER WRIGHT, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Centerville; was born in Lower Canada, Nov. 11, 1823. His father, Maj. Wright, moved to the northern part of Ohio when the subject of this sketch was only twelve years of age, remaining there until he died, which was in the year 1844, the mother also dying about the same time. Soon after their deaths, Hollister, in company with his brother, Rev. E. N. Wright, now of Waupaca, started West to find new homes for themselves, first locating in the town of Burnett, Dodge Co., Wis., where he pre-empted a claim from the Government, on which he lived until 1854, when he moved to Trempealeau Co., and settled on his present farm, being the first resident in that vicinity, with the exception of Mr. Lee. He first erected a small board shanty, a few rods south of his present residence, in which he lived four years. There used to be an Indian trail running across his farm from the Trempealeau mounds on the Mississippi to the Big Tamarack, which was a regular camping ground for the Winnebago Indians. There are a number of mounds a little north of Mr. Wright's house, of which we have seen descriptions as occurring in other parts of the State being of an oval shape 0. He made an excavation in one about the year 1860, resulting in the finding of some human bones, such as the skull, jaw bones, teeth and thigh bone. He well remembers the deep snow of the winter of 1856-57, when the roads were blockaded, and there was but one track from his section of the country to Trempealeau; also the Indian scare of 1862, when the neighbors all gathered together to defend themselves, though, fortunately, there were no Indians forthcoming. Mr. Wright has been County Treasurer of Trempealeau, also one of the Town Board of Trempealeau; is also connected with the Methodist Church at Centerville, having been a liberal contributor and faithful worker since he embraced that cause.

-Transcribed from the "History of Northern Wisconsin, 1881," page 1051




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