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Histories:  Trempealeau County Historical Accounts:

"History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917":

Chapter 15:

BIOGRAPHY - H SURNAMES

HAGEN, Alfred
HAGEN, Edward M
HAGEN, Eric
HAGEN, Fred
HAGEN, Thomas M
HAGESTAD, Andrew C
HAGESTAD, Knut K
HAINES Brothers (John & Adam)
HAINES, Christian
HAINES, Edward
HAINES, George
HAINES, Joseph W
HALDERSON, Albert
HALDERSON, James O
HALLANGER, John B
HALLANGER, Knudt P
HALLANGER, Knut K
HALVERSON, Christ & Edward
HALVERSON, Halvor J
HAMMER, Ludwig N
HAMMER, M N
HAMMOND, George
HANKEY, E J
HANSAASEN, Lars Mikkleson
HANSON, Edwin C
HANSON, Henry M
HANSON, James
HANSON, Johannes P
HANSON, Lars
HANSON, Morris
HANSON, Odell
HANSON, Ole C
HANSON, Peter
HANSON, Samuel
HANSON, Theodore M
HARDIE, La Verd Ernest
HARE, Claud Harrison
HARLOW, William E
HARMON, Thomas
HARTMAN, Frank J
HASS, George M & Walter R
HAUG, Ole
HAUGE, Thomas H
HEALD, Elizabeth
HEATH, Perry
HEGGE, Even A
HEGGE, Nels F
HEGGE, Sigvald N
HELLEKSON, Andrew M
HELSTAD, Ole O
HENRY, Edward J
HENRY, William
HENSEL, August F
HENSEL, Augustus W
HENSEL, Earl F
HENSEL, Iven L
HENSEL, Julius
HERMANN, Walter
HERREID, Gilbert M
HERREID, Gilbert Olson
HERREID, Ole G
HERREID, Peter T
HERREID, Thomas P
HERREID, Tosten G
HESS, Albert
.
HEWITT, Charles F
HEWITT, John Charles
HEWITT, Mark R
HIDERSHIDE, George N
HOGAN, Thomas
HOGDEN, Christian J
HOKLAND, Frederick N
HOLMES, Arthur Atwood
HOLMES, Charles Francis
HOLTAN, Hans
HOLTAN, Richard H
HOLTE, Even
HOPKINS, Florison D
HOPKINS, James
HOTCHKISS, E Scott
HOTCHKISS, Frank A
HOTZ, Jacob
HOVRE, Ole O
HULBERG, Bernhard
HULBERG, Conrad
HULEATT, Clarence F
HULEATT, Thomas P
HUME, Bert L
HUNTER, James N
HUNTER, John
HUNTER, Thomas
HUNTER, Thomas R
HUNTER, Walter
HUNTER, William
HUSLEGARD, Emil
HUTCHINS, Byron L
HYSLOP, William G
.

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Alfred Hagen, buttermaker for the Unity Co-operative Creamery at Strum, is one of the popular young men of the village and is thoroughly proficient in his chosen line of work.  He was born in Eau Claire, Wis., Oct. 10, 1882, son of Segvart A. and Karen (Olson) Hagen.  Segvart A. Hagen was born in Norway, came to Trempealeau County in the nineties, settled on a farm in section 12, Albion Township, and there lived until his death in 1906, since which time the widow has continued to make her home there.  Alfred Hagen remained with his parents until 15 years old.  Then he was employed as a farm hand for several years.  In 1911 he entered the Unity Creamery as a helper, and gradually perfected himself as a buttermaker until he was promoted to his present position in the spring of 1916. Mr. Hagen was married April 7, 1915, to Clara Engen, of Eleva, daughter of Ole and Mathia Engen, for many years residents of section 22, Albion Township, where the father died in 1908 and where the mother still lives.  Mr. and Mrs. Hagen have a daughter, Myrtle Kathrine, born March 12, 1916.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 613

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Edward M. Hagen, proprietor of a farm of 300 acres in section 5, Pigeon Township, known as Hagen's Farm, was born in Biri, Norway, Jan. 12, 1864, son of Mathias Olson and his wife, Annette Thompson.  The father died in Norway in June, 1865, and his wife in Norway in 1884.  In 1881 Edward M. emigrated to the United States, coming to Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, and locating at Pigeon Falls, where he resided until the spring of 1892, working out and saving his money.  Having by that time accumulated a fair sum, he purchased his present farm and has since resided on it, engaged in its development and cultivation, in which he has made great progress.  The previous period of 11 years was spent in the employ of P. Ekern, for whom he worked seven years as buttermaker at Pigeon Falls.  As a progressive farmer Mr. Hagen has sought to increase the value of his property by making substantial improvements.  In 1910 he rebuilt his residence, which is a two story building of 18 rooms and basement.  In 1916 he rebuilt the barn, which measures 44 by 60 by 16 feet with basement, and has an ell, 26 by 50 by 16, with basement, both furnished with concrete floors and installed with 40 steel stanchions and litter carrier.  The silo, built in the center of the barn, measures 14 by 31 feet.  All the buildings are electrically lighted and furnished with running water from a spring, the house having hot and cold water and bathroom.  Mr. Hagen plants six acres of his land with tobacco and has a tobacco shed, 26 by 130 feet in size.  His herd of Shorthorn cattle numbers 65 head, all high grade animals of which he milks 25.  He also has a flock of 30 sheep and 50 acres of his land is planted in clover.  He is a stockholder in the Pigeon Grain & Stock Company, and for six years has served as a director of the school board of his district.  May 16, 1891, Mr. Hagen was united in marriage with Jennie Moe of Pigeon Falls, in which place she was born May 4, 1873.  Her parents were John and Antoinette (Peterson) Moe, the former of whom, born in Norway, Sept. 17, 1841, came to America in 1869, settling in Pigeon Township, this county.  In 1872 he bought the farm on which his son-in-law, Mr. Hagen, now lives, and still resides here.  His wife, whom he married at Pigeon Falls, Aug. 28, 1872, was born in Norway, March 27, 1846, and is also now living and residing on the Hagen farm.  Mr. and Mrs. Hagen have ten children:  Aletta, wife of Alfred Nelson, a contractor of Pigeon Falls; Adolph, living at home; Elvina, who graduated from the La Crosse Normal school in 1914 and is now a teacher; Amanda, a student of the Whitehall high school, and Harold, Hilmer, Ansel, Delia, Milfred and Raymond, who are residing at home on the farm.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 444 - 445

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Eric Hagen, manager and partner in the firm of Hagen & Waller, general merchants, Osseo, was born in Sondreland, Norway, April 23, 1863, son of Hans E. and Anne (Lunde) Hagen, the former of whom came to America in 1869, farmed in Arcadia Township for many years, and now lives a retired life in Whitehall, the latter having died in 1875. Eric Hagen was reared to farm pursuits, and attended the country schools. His attention, however, was early turned to mercantile lines, and while still a youth he secured employment as a clerk in a store at Elk Creek. Further experience in the same line was secured in St. Paul and in Independence. In 1895 he came to Osseo and organized with Oliver Waller the firm of Hagen & Waller. This firm succeeded Larson, Getts & Co. in the general mercantile business. It has a large trade, and well deserves the esteem and confidence in which it is held by its numerous patrons. From 1897 to 1907 the firm owned a creamery at Osseo, and from 1904 until it was destroyed by fire in the winter of 1915, owned and operated the elevator there. Mr. Hagen is also interested in the State Bank of Osseo, in which he is the assistant cashier and one of the directors. Busy though he is with his financial interests, Mr. Hagen has found time for some excellent public service. Since the spring of 1914 he has been a member of the county board, and he has also been a member of the school and village boards. His fraternal relations are with the A. F. & A. M., while his religious affiliations are with the Congregational church, in which he is one of the trustees. Mr. Hagen was married March 17, 1891, to Mary Reid, of Burnside Township, daughter of James and Margaret (Lange) Reid. Mr. and Mrs. Hagen have five children: Mabel A., who graduated from the La Crosse normal school and was teacher in the Osseo schools. She was married to E. A. Nelson, a banker of Maddox, N. D., July, 1917. Henry, a farmer in Steele, N. D.; and Ralph E.,  Margaret and Alice, who are at home.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 591

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Fred Hagen, who is aiding in developing the agricultural resources of Gale Township on his farm of 104 acres in section 5, was born at Lillehammer, Norway, July 11, 1870, son of Simon and Ingeborg Hagen. The father was a mechanic and neither he nor his wife ever left their native land. Both are now deceased. Fred Hagen was the fifth born in a family of six children. He attended school in Norway and began regular industrial life at the age of 17 years. In 1893 he joined the tide of westward emigration and, landing in the United States, proceeded to Iowa, where he worked as a farmer in Ward County for about three years. He then spent a winter in Trempealeau County, Wis., but at the time did not settle here permanently, going instead to Dodge County, Minn., where he worked as a farm hand for about seven years. Then returning to Trempealeau County, he rented a farm in Gale Township, having previously rented one for three years in Minnesota, and went to farming for himself here. Eight years later, having saved money, he bought his present farm of 104 acres, on which he has since been engaged in general farming and stock raising. His property is well improved and he is enjoying a well-earned prosperity, being also a stockholder in the Farmers' Telephone Company. Mr. Hagen was married, Oct. 10, 1902, to Clara Dahl, who was born in Gale Township, daughter of Gustave and Len Dahl. Her parents, both now living in this township, are natives of Norway, the father being a retired farmer. Mrs. Hagen died Oct. 26, 1911, leaving three children: Stanley, born Sept. 14, 1903; Lester, born July 20, 1905, and Norman, born Nov. 8, 1908. The family are members of the Lutheran church at French Creek, and in politics Mr. Hagen is a Republican. When he first came to this country he was entirely ignorant of the English language, but acquired it quickly, considering his opportunities, and has since carved his way to a position of comparative prosperity, with good prospects for the future.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 539

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Thomas M. Hagen, who owns and operates Woodland Farm of 240 acres in section 5, Pigeon Township, is one of the thriving agriculturists of this township and one of its best known and respected citizens.  He was born in Norway, Dec. 12, 1867, his father being Matt Olson and his mother in maidenhood Annette Thompson.  It was on May 17, 1883 that he left his native land for the New World, his journey coming to an end at Whitehall, this county.  He soon entered the employ of P. Ekern of Pigeon Falls, for whom he worked for seven years.  These were years, not only of industry, but of economy and thrift, as he had no intention of spending his life in working for others.  At the end of the period mentioned, having enough money for his purpose, he purchased his present farm, a good piece of agricultural property, well improved, where he carries on general farming and dairying.  The house is a good frame building of two stories and basement.  The barn measures 48 by 70 by 14 feet, having stone basement and concrete floors, also 22 steel stanchions.  On the farm is also a stave silo, 14 by 32 feet.  Mr. Hagen has a herd of 30 cattle, of the Durham and Holstein breeds, of which he milks 25.  He was married Dec. 25, 1891, to Paulina Moe of Pigeon Township, who was born at Pigeon Falls, this county, May 8, 1874, daughter of John J. and Antoinette (Peterson) Moe.  Mr. and Mrs. Hagen have had ten children, three of whom died in infancy.  The others are:  Joel, born Jan. 11, 1893; Albert, Feb. 10, 1895, was married June 30, 1917, to Elsie Margaret Evenson; Palmer, Aug. 26, 1896; Edwin, March 15, 1899; Peter, Nov. 18, 1900; Rudolph, Sept. 12, 1904, and Karl, Nov. 30, 1907.  In March, 1916, they adopted a girl, Alice, who was born July 21, 1909.  The family are members of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 446 - 447

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Andrew C. Hagestad, proprietor of the Hagestad Stock Farm, which embraces the old Hagestad homestead in section 19, Ettrick Township, is one of the best-known agriculturists in this county. He has wide reputation as a breeder of Holstein-Fresian cattle, he has been an important factor in many farmers' organizations, and he has been very active indeed in church, school and township affairs. Like his father before him, he is energetic and progressive, and is recognized as one of the most useful citizens in the community. A native of this county, he was born on the place where he now lives, Jan. 23, 1876, son of Knut K. and Astri (Knutson) Hagestad, the early settlers. He was reared to farm pursuits, attended the public schools, and in the winters of 1896-97 he attended the College of Agriculture at the State University, receiving his diploma in the spring of 1897, thereafter became his father's partner in conducting the farm, acquiring a half interest in the place. In the winter of 1917, before his father's death, he secured the other half interest and is now the sole owner. On this place he successfully conducts agricultural operations along the latest approved lines. In connection with his breeding of Holstein-Fresian cattle, he owns the noted sire, "Prince Korndyke," No. 177,392, whose dam, Princess De Kol Echo, has a world-wide reputation for having in a stated tested period given 98 pounds of milk a day and produced over 28 pounds of butterfat in a week. The farm is also known for its Berkshire swine and Single-comb White Leghorn poultry. Aside from his farm holdings, Mr. Hagestad has extensive business interests, including stock in the Ettrick Creamery, of which he is a vice-president; in the Ettrick & Northern Railroad Company, of which he is a director, and in the Ettrick Lumber Company and the Farmers' Telephone Company at Ettrick. In church and public life he has been no less prominent, he is a member of the Lutheran church, and has held an office of trustee for eight years, has been director of the school district for the past nine years and township treasurer for the past five years. As a believer in agricultural progress he has affiliated himself with the Wisconsin Experiment Association, with headquarters at Madison. In advertising his farm, Mr. Hagestad makes use of an interesting device of his own invention. The device consists of two large wings, connected by a circle. The left wing bears the word "Quality," the right wing the word "Quantity," the top of the circle the word "Production," and the bottom of the circle the word "First," thus giving the slogan: "First in Production, First in Quality and First in Quantity." In the center of the circle is a picture of the famous Prince Korndyke. Mr. Hagestad was married Jan. 25, 1901, to Martha Christianson, of Ettrick, daughter of Hans Christianson, and this union has been blessed with five children: Victor R., born June 13, 1902; Evelyn C., born June 19, 1904, and died Dec. 27, 1904; Kenneth H., born Jan. 22, 1906; Elsie M., born June 4, 1910; and Ruth C., born April 3, 1914.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 604 - 605

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Knut K. Hagestad. One of the most important industries of Trempealeau County is that of stock raising, of which the subject of this sketch was for many years a leading representative.  He was born at Ulvic Hardanger, Bergenstift, Norway, June 26, 1846, his parents, Knut and Cathrina (Richolsen) Hagestad, being natives of the same place.  The father, who in Norway was a boat builder, emigrated to America with his family in 1854, settling in Columbia County, Wis.  There he remained until 1860, in which year he came to Trempealeau County, taking land which now constitutes the farm lately owned by his son, Knut K., and which he cultivated and developed, residing on it until his death, Aug. 22, 1872.  He became a man of influence in the community, serving as treasurer of the school board and in other offices.  His wife survived him a few years, dying in May, 1875.  Their family consisted of four children, Knut being the first in order of birth.  Knut K. Hagestad had but limited educational opportunities, attending school in Columbia County, Wis., for a part of three or four terms only.  He accompanied his parents to Trempealeau County, being then 14 years old, and resided at home until he was 18.  He then returned to the old home in Columbia County and worked for farmers in that vicinity for about 18 months.  Returning to this county in the month of January, he spent the next three months lumbering in the woods, after which he worked at grubbing for his father.  By this time he had saved some money and with this he bought two pairs of oxen, and hiring another pair from his father and one from his brother, he engaged in breaking land, among other jobs of this kind turning the first furrow in Lakes Coolie for Lars Jahr, on the farm now owned by H. K. Solberg and John Hogden.  After one season at breaking he sold his oxen and engaged in threshing one summer, working in the woods the next fall and winter.  From that time until 1872 he followed the carpenter's trade in the summer.  In this year his marriage occurred and he then rented his father's farm and operated it on that basis for about a year after his father's death, the estate being as yet unsettled.  It subsequently came into his possession and he took up his residence in the original house built of logs, but which was so skillfully constructed by himself that today it appears like a modern dwelling, the logs not being visible.  Mr. Hagestad also erected the main part of the present barn, another excellent piece of work, the building measuring 124 by 32 feet, with a nine-foot basement and 16-foot stockboards, the rock used for the foundations being quarried by him.  Starting with 160 acres of land, Mr. Hagestad increased the size of the farm to 228 acres of highly improved land, and his buildings and equipment were and are adequate to the fullest demands of modern farming and stock raising.  It was to the latter branch of his business that he devoted his chief attention.  When he began agricultural work for himself it was with the desire to raise pure-bred cattle, and in the early eighties he commenced with Shorthorns, purchasing two full-blooded sires.  About 1886 he decided that breed of cattle was more suited to beef purposes and consequently would not produce the maximum amount of milk, also that he could not breed them as profitably as he desired.  He then bought two full-blooded Holstein heifers and a bull and continued with this breed until his herd had become one of pure-blooded Holstein-Friesian cattle exclusively, which experiment he found highly satisfactory.  His original stock was obtained at Libertyville, Ill., and while there attending a sale he met Mons Anderson, a merchant of La Crosse, who purchased 12 head, and these, with Mr. Hagestad's three head, were shipped together to La Crosse, Mr. Hagestad taking charge of the car.  Upon arriving in La Crosse they paraded their stock through the streets, attracting considerable attention, as these were the first Holstein cattle seen in the county or anywhere in the vicinity.  Mr. Hagestad became the owner of about 50 head of these cattle, all fine specimens of the breed.  He frequently shipped stock to Texas, Old Mexico and various states of the Union, and in 1903 shipped six head to Japan for breeding purposes.  He and his son, Andrew C., for the last 25 years were engaged in breeding pure-blooded Berkshire hogs and S. C. White Leghorn chickens, which he continued to do until his death, April 18, 1917.

Mr. Hagestad was a member and vice-president of the Western Wisconsin's Holstein-Friesian Breeders' Association, and had been a director in the Western Wisconsin Telephone Company from its organization.  In addition to the interests mentioned, he was a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery Company and a stockholder and director in the Home Bank at Blair.  Other interests that he had in the Bank of Ettrick he turned over to his son before his death, and was then living practically retired, the son having taken over the management of the farm.  Mr. Hagestad was a Republican in politics and during his long and active career took a more or less prominent part in public affairs, serving on the township board, as chairman of the county board, and as representative to the State Assembly during the session of 1889.  On June 3, 1872, Mr. Hagestad was united in marriage to Astri Knutson, who was born in Hallingdahl, Norway, daughter of Andres and Astri (Johnson) Knutson.  Her parents, who were natives of the same province, came to America in 1860, locating in Trempealeau County, Wis., on land adjoining the Hagestad farm, where Mr. Knutson followed farming and stock raising.  He died Jun 7, 1891, and his wife May 12, 1895.  Mrs. Hagestad was the second born of seven children.  In her girlhood she attended school in this county, her attendance, however, being limited to about two months each summer, as her services were needed in the household.  The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hagestad are as follows:  Knut Martimus, who is a professor in the city schools of Santa Cruz, Calif.; Andrew C., residing on the home farm; Albert J., deceased; Kathrina, also deceased, who was the wife of C. L. Grinde, her husband now residing in Blair, Wis.; Esther, deceased; Clara, wife of John Fillner of Ettrick; William, a graduate of Gale College and of the State Agricultural School at Madison, who is now a farmer near Camp Douglas, Wis.; Anna, wife of Irving Swenson, a farmer of Ettrick Township; Cora (second), a nurse in the Lutheran Hospital at La Crosse; Hilda, who resides at home and a child who died in infancy.  Mr. Hagestad was a member of the Lutheran church, to which his family also belong.  One of the leading men in his line of business in Trempealeau County, he was widely known and highly esteemed.  The example he set more than 30 years ago in the breeding of Holstein cattle has since been followed successfully by many other farmers in this region and is now an important branch of the stock raising industry of the county, adding to the sum total of wealth and the general prosperity; and in this way he was a public benefactor.  His activities along this and other lines also conduced to his own benefit, and he was recognized as one of the well-to-do and substantial citizens of the community in which he lived.  His wife, an estimable lady, who was to him a worthy helpmate, still resides on the old homestead.  Mr. Hagestad for many years took a warm interest in Gale College, becoming president of its board of directors at the time it passed into Lutheran hands.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 454 - 456

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Haines Brothers. Five miles south of Arcadia Village, in section 15, Arcadia Township, lies one of the best farms in Trempealeau County. Its proprietors, John and Adam Haines, are sons of Christian C. and Margaret Haines, who came to Bill's Valley, Arcadia Township, about the close of the Civil War, their former home having been in New York state. Both John and Adam Haines were born in Bill's Valley, the former Oct. 26, 1867, the latter March 2, 1872. They were early trained in everything pertaining to agricultural work and dairying, and the farm of 372 acres which they bought from their father is a well productive farm. It was partially improved since that time; on it stood a small house and a small barn. In 1895 they entered into a partnership to carry on the farm and since then have made numerous valuable improvements, among them a large two-story brick house, well supplied with running water and electricity throughout the barn and house. They erected in 1901 a full basement barn, 34 by 64 by 16 feet, above the basement. They have also built a machine shed, 20 by 50 feet, and other necessary buildings. Carrying on general farming and dairying, they keep a number of cows and horses. Adam Haines was united in matrimony Nov. 5, 1895, to Elizabeth Pampuch, daughter of a prosperous farmer near Arcadia. . They have nine children, whose names with dates of birth are: Clarence, born Oct. 15, 1896 (died in June, 1899); Mathilda L., March 17, 1898; Delia I., Dec. 18, 1901; Clara A., Dec. 13, 1902; Ervine, Oct. 2, 1904; Gilbert C, Dec. 16, 1906; Amanda E., Nov. 8, 1908; Benzell, Feb. 7, 1912, and Eugene, Nov. 30, 1917. All except Clarence are living and are yet in district, parochial and high school, but will latter attend higher institutions. John and Adam Haines are patriotic American citizens, who are very active in the district, the father for some years was a member of the school board. They are also stockholders in the Arcadia Co-operative Creamery, John also holding stock in the Arcadia Bank and Adam Haines owns property in town. They were reared as German Catholics and are members of the Church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help at Arcadia.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 794 - 795

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Christian Haines, a pioneer of Bill's Valley, Arcadia Township, was born in Hohenzollern, Germany, Oct. 11, 1835, and in 1856 came to America with his parents, who settled at Herkimer, N. Y. Two years later the father died, and in 1858 the family moved to Canastota, N. Y., where Christian Haines engaged in the mercantile business until the close of the Civil War. He was unfortunate in business, however, and lost all he had, so to retrieve his fortunes he came west, locating first at Fountain City, Buffalo County, this state. A little later he came to Arcadia Township, this county, settling in Bill's Valley on a farm. He was a skilled apiarist, keeping numerous colonies of bees, and producing as much as 7,500 pounds of honey in one year, also taking first premiums at county and state fairs. A prominent citizen of the community in which he lived, he took part in local government, serving a number of years on the Arcadia town board. His wife, Margaret Bill Haines, to whom he was married at Herkimer, N. Y., in 1856, was born in Wilsenrode, Germany, Aug. 22, 1840, and came to America as a child with her parents, who settled at Utica, N. Y. She shared all the hardships and privations of pioneer life with her husband and also shared in his successes, being a true and worthy helpmeet. She died May 3, 1916. Mr. Haines died Dec. 26, 1914. Both were members of the Church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help at Arcadia. Of their family of 14 children nine are now living.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 758

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Edward Haines has lived in Arcadia Township since early childhood, his parents having brought him here in 1865. Growing up with the county, he has taken his part in its development, and is now one of the solid and substantial men of the community. He was born in Herkimer County, N. Y., March 12, 1858, son of Christian and Margaret Haines. The parents were born in Germany, located in New York State as young people, there married and lived there until coming to Wisconsin. Edward had attended school a short time in New York State, and continued his studies in the school of district 6, Arcadia Township, until about 14 years of age. He was reared to farm pursuits and remained with his parents until his marriage in 1882, when he took his bride to a rented farm in Bill's Valley, now known as the Michael English place. In 1883 he rented the Scholidon farm on the Fountain City Ridge. Misfortune overtook him, and he lost nearly everything that he possessed. But in August, 1884, he acquired 180 acres of partly improved land in Meyers Valley, two and a half miles south of Arcadia Village. Moving into a log house covered with boards, which stood on the place, he and his good wife set to work to establish their fortunes. Gradually they added to their possessions until the farm now consists of 488 acres, and in addition to this they own several residences in Arcadia Village. The log cabin has been replaced with a sightly set of buildings, including a two-story, 11-room modern brick house; a frame barn, 34 by 80 feet with full basement; three poultry houses; a machine shed, 18 by 40 feet; a stone milk house, a garage and other buildings. The place is devoted to general farming and dairying, a good herd of Durham and Holstein cattle being maintained. The equipment, tools, machinery and implements are adequate and ample. Mr. Haines' business holdings include stock in the Arcadia Co-Operative Creamery Company, the Bank of Arcadia, the Farmers' Bank, the Western Wisconsin Telephone Company and other organizations. A Democrat in politics, he has served as supervisor of Arcadia Township two years and has been a member of the school board of district 6 for three years. Mr. Haines was married Oct. 23, 1882, to Julia Woutchik, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Woutchik. Mrs. Haines came to America at the age of 17 years, following a sister who had come several years before. She and her husband have had 15 children: Margaret, born Oct. 3, 1883, died April 6, 1890; Frank, born Sept. 20, 1884, died Feb. 24, 1913; Elizabeth, born Jan. 14, 1885, is now Mrs. Isadore Meyers; Michael, born July 15, 1887, is now on the Casper Meyers farm, owned by his father; Catherine, born March 20, 1889, is the wife of Henry Fernholz, of Arcadia Village; Edward T., born Aug. 22, 1890, lives at home; Mary, born Nov. 18, 1891, is a clerk in Arcadia Village; Anna, born April 9, 1893, is in the Convent of Notre Dame, at Milwaukee; Rose, born Sept. 28, 1894, lives at home; Agnes, born Feb. 26, 1896, died in infancy; Agnes (second), born April 11, 1897, is in the Convent of Notre Dame at Milwaukee; Florence, born Sept. 19, 1898, lives at home ; Raymond, born Sept. 3, 1900, died in infancy; Lenora, born Feb. 28, 1902, is a student in the Arcadia High School; Fiorina was born Feb. 4, 1905, and lives at home. The family faith is that of the Church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help at Arcadia Village, of which Mr. Haines was a member of the building committee when the parochial school was erected.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 721 - 722

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George Haines, who is conducting a prosperous farming business in section 8, Arcadia Township, was born in Scranton, Pa., Oct. 26, 1867. His parents, John B. and Elizabeth (Kuntz) Haines, were both born in Germany, the mother coming with her parents to the United States in 1853. They were married in Utica, N. Y., in 1853, and came by train from that city to La Crosse, Wis., in July, 1868, and then by ox team from La Crosse to Arcadia Township, Trempealeau County. On arriving here they located on what is now the Louis Remlinger farm in section 1, where they remained until the following year. In 1869 they bought 40 acres and homesteaded 160 acres in Myers Valley, section 8, Arcadia Township, and here Mr. Haines built a small house and began to make a home. His efforts were successful and he continued to work the farm for many years, and to make improvements, when he sold it to his son George in 1890. He died Nov. 18, 1908. His wife is still living in her own home in Arcadia Village, her daughter Elizabeth, who is unmarried, residing with her. Their children were: Christiana, Mary, John, Elizabeth, Anton, Margaret, William and George, all of whom are living. Mary and Elizabeth reside in Arcadia Village, Margaret in Pennsylvania, Anton at Rice Lake, Wis., and John and William are with the Massuere Company, general merchants in Arcadia. George Haines had limited opportunities as a boy for acquiring an education, but made the best of those he had. He lived with his parents until 23 years old, at which time he bought the old homestead, where he has since resided, and which he is cultivating with profitable results. He is also a stockholder in the Bank of Arcadia. Jan. 26, 1897, he was married to Mary, daughter of John and Pauline Kostner, of Arcadia Village. He and his wife have a family of eight children: Clotilda, born Sept. 26, 1898, who resides at home; Cyrill, born Nov. 4, 1899, residing at home; Marcellus, born April 29, 1902, who is a student in St. John's University at Collegeville, Minn.; Orlando, born Oct. 9, 1904; Thelma, born Jan. 15, 1906; Eldred, born May 10, 1909; Dolores, born Sept. 19, 1911; Everett, born Aug. 8, 1914, and Brunetta, born Sept. 24, 1917. Mr. Haines is a Democrat in politics and has served as supervisor one term. Since 1897 he has belonged to the Catholic Foresters and to the Knights of Columbus since 1914. He and his family are members of the Catholic church.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 720 - 721

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Joseph W. Haines, proprietor of the Pleasant View Farm, in section 16, Arcadia Township, was born in Herkimer, N. Y., July 7, 1863, the son of Christian and Margaret (Bill) Haines, who brought him first to Buffalo County and then to Trempealeau County. He resided at home until he was 21 years old, during which time he had some schooling, though his educational opportunities were limited. On attaining his majority he went to Utica, N. Y., where he entered the employ of the New York Central & Hudson River Railway, but finding the work too dangerous, he stayed but a few months, then returning to Wisconsin. In the winter of 1886 he entered the employ of the Goodyear Lumber Company, near Mather, Wis., and remained with this firm for three years, in 1889 returning to his parents' homestead. In the same year he purchased his present farm. Jan. 7, 1890, he was married to Anna K., daughter of Jacob and Mary George of Glencoe, Buffalo County. This homestead, where the young couple began housekeeping, was a tract of 200 acres, partially improved, there being a small frame house on the property. Here Mr. Haines has resided ever since, engaged in general farming, and also in honey production, being, like his father, a skilled apiarist and putting up for sale the best honey that can be obtained in the market. He has made many improvements on the farm, including the erection of new buildings. His present residence is a two-story frame house, consisting of upright and wing, and piped for both soft and hard running water, the house being heated by furnace. He has also a full basement, frame barn, measuring 34 by 72 by 14 above the basement; a granary, machine sheds, double corn crib, and a combined ice and milk house, all the buildings being in good condition. Aside from his own fai-ming interests Mr. Haines is a stockholder in the Arcadia Co-operative Creamery, the Arcadia Shipping Association and the Trout Run Farming Company. In politics he is a Democrat, and has been director on the Cortland school board for many years. He and his wife had a large family of 18 children, whose names are respectively: Herman, Elmer C, Leo J., Minnie E., Christian J., Henry E. (deceased), Joseph M., Elsie L., Margaret A., Henry E. (second), Norbert, Jerome J., Armilla E., Arthur F., Clarence A., Frank N., Alfred M. and Virginia A. Their record in brief is as follows: Herman, born Dec. 3, 1891, graduated from the Cortland grade schools, from the Alma (Buffalo County) Training School for Teachers, and from the Winona Business College. He has been in the employ of the Interstate Packing Company of Winona and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad at Owatonna, Minn., and is at present teller of a bank at Owatonna, Minn. He served as corporal and clerk with the Minnesota State Guard on the Texas border during the recent disturbances in Mexico. Elmer C, born March 1, 1892, graduated from the Cortland graded school, taught school for some time, and is now at Amidon, N. D., where he is foreman of the Farm Land & Coal Company. Leo J., born Aug. 17, 1893, graduated from the Cortland graded school and the Alma Training School, and has taught at Amidon, N. D., where he purchased a quarter section of land. He is now preparing at Ft. Dodge for service in the great war, with Battery E, Field Artillery, being kitchen and dining room orderly in charge of the food supplies in his barracks. Minnie E., born Aug. 20, 1894, graduated from the Cortland graded school, the Arcadia high school, and the Alma Training School, and has been a teacher for four years. Christian J., born Dec. 31, 1895, is living on the homestead with his parents. Henry E., the first of the name, was born April 25, 1896, and died July 25, 1899. Joseph M., born Sept. 24, 1898, resides on the parental homestead. Elsie L., born Feb. 4, 1900, is a student in the Arcadia high school. Margaret A., born July 26, 1901, and Henry E., second, born Oct. 7, 1902, are both students, residing at home. The other children living at home are: Norbert J., born Jan. 16, 1904 ; Jerome J., born Oct. 30, 1905; Armilla E., born Dec. 10, 1906; Arthur F., born April 14, 1908; Clarence A., born Jan. 31, 1910; Frank N., born Oct. 5, 1911; Alfred M., born Dec. 13, 1912, and Virginia, born Jan. 25, 1917. Mr. Haines and his family are Catholics in religion and attend the church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help at Arcadia. He and his wife have been fortunate in rearing their large family, as they have lost but one child. Their other children are all well trained in religion and morality and give promise of growing to useful manhood and womanhood.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 758 - 759

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Albert Halderson, a well known and respected resident of section 1, Caledonia Township, was born at Valders in the northern part of Norway, Nov. 25. 1847, son of John and Gertie (Olson) Halderson. The father was born in the same locality in 1817 and his wife in 1816, their marriage taking place in 1841. While in his native land John Halderson lived under a landlord named Eric Strand and worked a certain number of days in each season spring, summer, fall and winter—for home privileges on Strand's property. Mr. Strand finally sold out all his interests in Norway and came to America, and by arrangement with Mr. Halderson brought him and his family with him. While on the journey between New York and Wisconsin the two men became accidentally separated, but in Dane County, Wis., Mr. Halderson subsequently learned through a cousin, Ole Brown of La Crosse, that Mr. Strand had located in Bostwick Valley, La Crosse County, and so he came on with his family. This was in 1858. To pay his indebtedness to Mr. Strand, Mr. Halderson, who was a carpenter by trade, worked for him in that capacity at intervals, Mr. Strand assisting him and his family when it was necessary until the account was settled between them. The first home of the Halderson family in Wisconsin was a dugout in the side of a hill in Bostwick Valley, and in this they lived for the first year or two. In 1860 Mr. Halderson bought 120 acres of wild land from the government, on which he built a two-room log house, and in 1870 he erected a more substantial and convenient log house, hewn inside and out, also sided and plastered. It was of two stories with basement and contained six rooms, and is today occupied by Knute Halderson, a brother of the subject of this sketch. Mr. Halderson, the father, cleared and developed all the plow land on the 120-acre tract, using oxen for his first team, the money for which he obtained by splitting rails at 75 cents per hundred. To accomplish this he had to walk three and a half miles every morning and back at night, working all day without dinner. Being a powerfully built man, Mr. Halderson was popularly known in the neighborhood as "Big John." In 1881 he sold this farm to his brother Knute, and moved to Coon Valley, Vernon County, Wis., where he bought an unimproved farm of 80 acres, this place being his home until the death of his wife Gertie in 1891. He then sold the farm to his son Peter and spent the rest of his life with his children, his death occurring Dec. 2, 1897, at the home of his daughter, Jane Nelson, near Viroqua, Wis. The children of John and Gertie Halderson were six in number: Jane, born in Norway, who resides in Spokane, Wash ; Albert, whose name appears at the head of this sketch; Ole, born in Norway, April 8, 1853, who now resides in Willamette Valley, Oregon; Knute, born on shipboard while on the trip to America in 1857; Peter, born in Bostwick Valley, La Crosse County, in 1861, who died at La Crosse during the winter of 1915-16, and a daughter, born in Bostwick Valley, who died in infancy. Albert Halderson was brought up on his parents' farm and adopted agriculture for his occupation. He was married in 1868 to Mary Gaarder of Bostwick Valley, La Crosse County, Wis., of which union there was one son, J. 0. Halderson, now a furniture dealer in Galesville, Wis. Mrs. Mary Halderson died in August, 1873, at the age of about 26, she having been in Norway in 1847. Mr. Halderson contracted a second marriage with Rachael Larson, who was born in Norway Sept. 22, 1850. She was killed in the summer of 1886 in a runaway accident. Their children are: Melvin of Holmen, La Crosse County, Wis.; Louis of Treampealeau County, Wis.; Elmer and Frank, who reside with their father. Mr. Halderson was married the third time April 24, 1887, to Rosa Caswell. Their children are: Gertrude, resides at home; Raymond, county agent, living at Elkins, W. Va.; Grace, a teacher at Bangor, Wis.; Carrol, a student at Galesville high school. The family church is the Methodist.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 376 - 377

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James O. Halderson, president of the Halderson-Plummer Company, Incorporated, of Galesville, of which place he is one of the leading business men, was born in Harmony, Vernon County, Wis., Feb. 18, 1871, son of Albert and Mary (Gaarder) Halderson. He was educated in the common schools of Vernon County and remained at home until he was 20 years of age, when he became clerk in the furniture store of Joseph Polver at Viroqua, Wis. There he remained for three years, during the last year of which period he had full charge of the business, having mastered it in every detail. In 1894 Mr. Halderson came to Galesville and here established an up-to-date furniture and undertaking business, with Thomas Call as an equal partner, the style of the firm being Halderson & Call. Two years later their establishment was burned out, entailing a complete loss, but, undaunted, Mr. Halderson made a new start, this time alone and on a small scale, his place of business being located in the Button building. By hard work and upright deahng he built up a flourishing business, which increased steadily year by year. He now owns a fine store building, complete in every branch of the business, located on the corner of Ridge and Allen streets. This location he purchased from M. B. Parker and son Ervin in 1898. He has just built a tasteful modern residence north of his business block facing on Ridge street. In July, 1915, Mr. Halderson sold a half interest in the business to W. F. Plummer, and it was then incorporated as the Halderson-Plummer Company, with J. O. Halderson, president; Mrs. J. 0. Halderson, vice-president; W. F. Plummer, secretary and treasurer. Mr. Halderson is a graduate of the Clark Embalming School of Chicago and of the Williams Embalming School of Oshkosh, Wis., and holds a state certificate as a thoroughly qualified funeral director. As a business man he has gained a reputation for honesty and reliability that is one of his most valuable assets. Aside from their furniture and undertaking departments, the Halderson-Plummer Company deal in pianos, organs, talking machines and other similar goods, keeping articles of standard merit. Mr. Halderson was married June 24, 1896, to Ellen Cook, who was born at Decorah Prairie, this county, July 25, 1870, daughter of David and Agnes (Henderson) Cook. Mrs. Halderson was graduated from the Galesville schools in 1888. For several terms she was a proficient teacher in the rural schools, and for a long period a clerk in the department store of Gilbertson & Myhre at Galesville. Mr. and Mrs. Halderson have two children: James Haskell, born June 2, 1899, who was graduated from Galesville high school in 1917, and Theresa Grace, born March 8, 1902, who is now a student in the high school. Mr. Halderson is a member of Decorah Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Brotherhood of American Yeomen.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 484 - 485

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John B. Hallanger, a well known farmer of Hegg, Ettrick Township, was born in this township, Feb. 5, 1866, son of Knut K. and Symoa (Bgotveit) Hallanger.  He acquired a district school education in Ettrick Township and at the age of 18 years began to work out for others at threshing, sawing lumber and whatever he could find to do.  He also spent some of his winters cutting timber in the woods, and with his brother operated the homestead farm for a number of years.  In 1909 he made a trip to the Pacific coast, for pleasure only, spending the time in sightseeing.  The following winter he bought his present farm at Hegg, consisting of 204 acres, in addition to which he has 20 acres of timber land lying six miles farther east.  Mr. Hallanger, besides raising various crops, is engaged in dairying, keeping good cows for milking purposes, and is conducting his farm on a profitable basis.  He is also a stockholder and director in the Ettrick Lumber Company, a stockholder in the Home Bank at Blair, the Ettrick Telephone Company and the Farmers' Exchange at Blair.  He belongs to the United Lutheran Church at Hegg, and in politics may be termed an independent Republican.  He has never married.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 373 - 374

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Knudt P. Hallanger. Among the flourishing and well kept farms of Ettrick Township is that of the subject of this sketch, Knudt P. Hallanger, a practical agriculturist, who has achieved prosperity chiefly through his own efforts and is now numbered among the substantial citizens of this township. Like many other successful farmers of the county, Mr. Hallanger is of Norwegian birth, having been born in Handanger, Norway, July 31, 1860, son of Paul and Guri (Johnson) Hallanger, natives of the same country and locality, where Paul Hallanger was born Jan. 9, 1837, and his wife Nov. 2, 1834. On July 5, 1867, the family made their appearance in Beaver Valley, this county, locating on the farm now owned by Knudt P. Hallanger. It was not then a farm, however, but merely a tract of wild land awaiting the plow of the pioneer. With a pair of oxen Mr. Hallanger began the work of cultivation and for years thereafter he was an extremely busy man. The original tract consisted of 80 acres, and for awhile this was all he owned, but in time he doubled the size of the farm, so that it contained 160 acres at the time of his retirement in 1893. For a number of years he continued to use oxen for his plowing and other farm work, changing to horses as conditions improved and he became more prosperous, the horse being the less hardy animal. On retiring, as above mentioned, he took up his residence in Hegg, but after spending some years there he returned to the farm, where he died Jan. 19, 1913. He took no active part in town affairs, but was a man well known and respected for his industry, intelligence and good neighborly qualities. His wife survived him a little over two years, dying Feb. 2, 1915. They were the parents of eight children, four of whom are now living : Knudt P., who was the eldest ; Breta, wife of Errick Sime, a farmer of Ettrick Township; Louisa, wife of John Shoblom, a farmer and ranchman in Montana; and Martin, who resides at Chippewa Falls, Wis.

Knudt P. Hallanger acquired the elements of an English education in the district school of his present neighborhood. Like other farmers' boys he had to make himself useful at an early age and was up in the morning doing chores long before the average city boy crawls reluctantly from bed. The hard work and fresh air did him no harm, however, but strengthened his lungs and his muscles, and at the age of 18 years he began to work in the woods during the winter time, resuming his farm work on the family homestead in the summer, and in this way he was occupied for eleven years. Later he purchased the old homestead, on which he has since resided and which now contains 140 acres of land. Here he carries on general farming very successfully and according to up to date methods, having good barns and all necessary buildings and equipment, and in 1915 he erected a new and handsome modern residence, which is the comfortable home of a large family circle. Though devoting all his business hours to his farm, he is a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery Company, the Farmers' Exchange of Blair and the Ettrick Telephone Company.

Mr. Hallanger began domestic life on his own account over 25 years ago, when, April 20, 1891, he was united in marriage with Betsy Johnson, who was born in Franklin Township, Jackson County, Wis., daughter of Nels and Jorand (Erickson) Johnson. Her parents were born and married in Hardanger, Norway, and came to America in 1867, setthng in the location above mentioned, their dwelling being near the county line dividing Jackson and Trempealeau Counties, so that it was not far from the Hallanger farm. Mrs. Johnson died when her daughter Betsy was a mere babe, her husband surviving her until 1901. Mrs. Hallanger was the youngest member of the family, the other children being: Lesa, wife of Andrew Lee, who resides in Frankhn Township, Jackson County; Aleck, also residing there, in a part of the old Johnson home; and Nellie, who is the wife of C. K. Lein, a farmer in Robinson, Kidder County, N. D. Mr. and Mrs. Hallanger have had a family of 13 children: Palmer Nicoli, Joseph Gilbert, Helmer and Christian, who are deceased; Helmer Bertram, residing at home; Cornelia, deceased; Cornelia Martina, Elvin Sigvort, Evelyn Jose, Carl Johan, Bernice Louisa, residing at home, and Edward Julius and Esther Juliet, who are deceased. The family are members of the United Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Hallanger is a Republican. He has served 16 years as a member of the school board, was township assessor five years and was again elected in 1917, and has also served as school clerk and treasurer and as trustee of his church. As a man of varied activities he is energetic and I'esourceful, using good judgment in business matters and conscientiously performing every piece of work that comes to hand, whether it is for himself or pertaining to the community at large.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 371 - 373

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Knut K. Hallanger, one of the earliest settlers in Beaver Creek Valley, Ettrick Township, was born in Hardanger, Norway, in June, 1833.  He came to the United States in 1854, settling on Koshkanong Prairie, near Stoughton, Dane County, Wis.  In 1858 he located in Beaver Creek Valley, Ettrick Township, Trempealeau County, and engaged in farming, taking up government land and acquiring more by purchase.  The land he obtained was wild, but he cleared and cultivated it, and after many years of hard labor had developed it into a good farm.  It was his residence until 1910, in which year he retired and moved to Galesville, where he is now living in a comfortable residence which he bought at the time he left the farm.  As one of the first settlers in Beaver Creek Valley, and a resident of it for more than half a century, Mr. Hallanger witnessed many changes and improvements in the township.  For a number of years he served as postmaster at Hegg, being appointed in 1873 by President Grant.  He was also for a number of years township assessor and for one term supervisor.  A Lutheran in religion, he became one of the founders of the church of that denomination at Hegg, and assisted in building a number of other churches in the county.  When he arrived here from Norway he could speak no English, but soon acquired such a good knowledge of the language that he used to act as interpreter for the early Norwegian settlers.

Knut K. Hallanger was married in Wisconsin to Symoa Bgotveit, who also was a native of Hardanger, Norway, and who died Oct. 22, 1906.  They had a family of seven children:  Alexander, John (first) and John (second), who are deceased; John B., a farmer of Hegg, Ettrick Township; Helland Louis and Carl, both residing in Galesville, and Helena Bertina, who is now Mrs. C. G. Pains, of Ettrick Township.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 373

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Christ and Edward Halverson, two brothers who own and operate a fine farm in Norway Coulie, Arcadia Township, were born in this valley, Christ June 13, 1875, and Edward March 22, 1881. They are the sons of German and Jennie Halverson, both of whom were born in Norway, the father in December, 1842, and the mother in October, 1844. German and Jennie Halverson came to America in 1864, locating first in Dane County, Wisconsin, where they resided one year. Arriving in Trempealeau County in 1865, Mr. Halverson homesteaded 160 acres of wild land in Norway Coulie, Arcadia Township, it being situated in sections 13 and 24. The first residence of the family here was a dugout in the side of a hill, and it was in this humble dwelling that their first child, Ella, was born. Later on Mr. Halverson built a frame house, one and a half stories high, with upright and wing, which building is now standing, being occupied as a dwelling by the subjects of this sketch. He also built a frame barn, which, though delapidated, is still standing. In 1900 the property came into possession of Christ and Edward Halverson, and nine years later the father died. His wife is still living with her two sons, the joint proprietors of the farm, but since 1915 has been an invalid. She is now 71 years of age. The two brothers have built a frame barn with hip roof, 24 by 67 by 16 feet, together with machine sheds, granary, hog house and poultry house, corn cribs and all necessary buildings, which are kept in first class condition. They carry on general farming and dairying, having at this time 50 head of cattle, with hogs, horses and poultry. They are stockholders in the Arcadia Shipping Association, the Arcadia Co-operative Creamery and the Farmers Telephone Company. Their religious affiliations are with Norway Coulie Lutheran church, of which their parents were among the founders. Edward Halverson was married June 21, 1913, to Carrie, daughter of Ole and Helena Olson of Norway, she coming to America alone in 1911. They have one child, Josie, now three years of age. The brothers and sisters of Christ and Edward Halverson are as follows: Ella, born in 1867, who is now Mrs. Carl Haagen of Fosston, Minn.; Ole G., born in 1869, who is a farmer at Big Tamarack. Arcadia Township; Halvor, born in 1871, and now living at Valley City, N. D.; Maline, born in 1872, now Mrs. Jens Lee of Valley City, N. D.; Mary, born in 1876, now the wife of Carl Lee of Valley City, N. D.; Minnie, born in 1878, who is the wife of Louis Nelson of Koba, N. D.; Julius, born in 1883, whose present whereabouts is unknown, and Julia, born in 1885, who is now Mrs. Oscar Olson, now of Valley City, N. D. The Halverson farm lies in one of the most beautiful coulies of Trempealeau County. The land is very rolling but fertile, and the labors of the two brothers, Christ and Edward, have greatly increased its value.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 795 - 796

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Halvor J. Halvorson, expert buttermaker at the Eleva Co-Operative Creamery, has been connected with the creamery industry in this village for 18 years, and is thoroughly familiar with all departments of his business. He was born in Chippewa Falls, Wis., Oct. 6, 1874, son of John and Mary (Haganess) Halvorson, who operate a farm in Eau Claire County. Halvor J. Halvorson spent his boyhood on a farm, and came to this county in 1899 as a helper in the old Eleva creamery. Desiring to further perfect himself, he studied in the Dairy School of the Agricultural College of the University of Wisconsin. Completing his course there March 1, 1903, he took his present position, and here he has since remained. In addition to this, he operates a farm of 75 acres in section 10, Albion Township, where he carries on general agricultural operations. He holds the agency for the Wonder Milking Machines for Eau Claire, Trempealeau and Buffalo counties, and has installed several on Trempealeau County farms. Busy as he is, he has found time for public service, and has been a member of the village council three years. Mr. Halvorson was married July 1, 1902, to Louisa Serum, who was born in Buffalo County, Wis., Feb. 23, 1877, and died Oct. 1, 1907, daughter of Ole and Mary Serum. Mr. and Mrs. Halvorson had two children: Josephine, born April 1, 1903, and Obert, born June 14, 1906.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 641 - 642

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Ludwig N. Hammer, secretary and treasurer of the Hammer-Enghagen Company, conducting a general mercantile business in Galesville, was born in Heedmarken, Norway, Jan. 26, 1857, son of Nels Burson and Thrine Hammer. Both parents died in their native land, where the father followed the occupation of millwright. Ludwig N. was the sixth born in a family of eight children and attended both common and high school in Norway. Remaining with his parents until he was 16 years old, he then left home and for some years worked at different occupations, chiefly as clerk in stores. At the age of 23 he left Norway for the United States, locating in Frenchville, Wis., in 1879. In 1881 he came to Galesville as clerk for Wilson-Davis, and remained in their employ until 1889, when he became associated with W. H. Jordan. In 1895 Mr. Jordan sold his intei-est to Mr. Enghagen, since which time the business was conducted under the style of Hammer & Enghagen. The firm moved into their present quarters in the spring of 1916. They carry a large stock of goods and enjoy a wide and growing patronage. Feb. 15, 1917, the firm incorporated as Hammer-Enghagen Company, with a $50,000 capital. The officers are: P. J. Enghagen, president; Carl Svensen, vice-president; L. M. Hammer, secretary and treasurer. Mr. Hammer is a stockholder and director in the Bank of Galesville, and also owns business and residence property in the village. He was president of the Business Men's Association for a number of years and is at the present time one of is trustees. He is also a member of the board of trustees of Gale College and has served on the village council several terms. In pohtics he is an independent Republican, supporting his party at national elections, but exercising his own discretion on other occasions. Mr. Hammer was married Nov. 7, 1885, to Lena Trondson, who was born in Trempealeau County, Wis., daughter of Anders and Agnethe Trondson. Her parents were both natives of that province in Norway in which Mr. Hammer was born. After coming to the United States they lived for some years in Trempealeau County, Wis., later moving to Duel County, South Dakota, where, after a number of years spent in farming, he died. His wife also died in that county. Mr. and Mrs. Hammer have had seven children, of whom two, Nora and Arthur, are deceased. The survivors are: Joseph, a bookkeeper in the Bank of Galesville; Hulda, who is engaged in teaching; Margaret, residing at home, who is a graduate Of the high school class of 1916; and Ruth and Rolf, who are attending school. The family are affiliated religiously with the Lutheran church.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 302

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M. N. Hammer, proprietor of Fair View Farm, in section 17, Gale Township, was born in Hedemarken, Norway, son of Nels Burson and Thrine Hammer. His parents, who died in their native land, were born in the same province, the father Nov. 22, 1820, and the mother Jan. 12, 1817.

M. N. Hammer attended school in Norway until he was 17 years of age, when he began to learn the moulder's trade, which he followed for some four years or more, in Norway, and for seven years in the United States, to which country he came in 1881. He located first in Frenchville, Trempealeau County, and then went to Clay County, Minn., where he took up land and resided three years, subsequently returning to this county and settling in Galesville. For some years thereafter, however, he worked in various places, and then bought his present farm, but in the same year, 1891, began working in the flour mill of Wilson Davis at Galesville. He continued to work in the mill for 16 years, at the end of which time he moved onto his farm of 40 acres, where he has since been engaged in breeding Jersey and Holstein cattle. He has made a number of improvements on the place, greatly increasing its value, and is doing a profitable business. He is also a stockholder in the Arctic Springs Creamery. For a number of years he has served as superintendent of roads. In politics he is a Republican.

Mr. Hammer was married May 28, 1882, to Marthea Larson, daughter of Lars Keos and Alice Sather, who was born March 24, 1853, in the same province in Norway that the Hammer family came from. Her parents died in their native land. He and his wife have had five children: Nels N., residing at home and engaged in the lightning rod business; he married Josephine Brenengen; John M., who is connected with the J. I. Chase Company, of Racine, Wis.; Elmer and Alice, residing at home, and Thorval, who is deceased. Mr. Hammer is fraternally connected with the I. S. W. A., of Galesville. The family are members of the Lutheran church.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 359 - 360

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George Hammond, proprietor of an excellent dairy farm of 176 acres in sections 19 and 20, Gale Township, was born at Barnbydun, Yorkshire, England, Feb. 25, 1856.  His parents, George and Mary Ann (Wittels) Hammond, were natives of the same place, the father being a farmer.  They came to America in 1858 and after residing in Canada for 18 months came on to Trempealeau County in 1860, locating in Big Tamarac Valley.  Here George Hammond, Sr., bought land and in course of time developed a farm, which he later sold, moving to Jackson County.  Three years later he returned to Trempealeau County and took a farm in Gale Township, on which , however, he lived only 18 months.  He then returned to Little Tamarac Valley, settling on another farm, which was his home until a short time before his death, as the last three months of his life were spent at the home of his son George.  He died in October, 1907, and his wife about two years later.  His life was devoted to farming and he took no part in public affairs, but was esteemed as a good neighbor and reliable citizen.  George Hammond, second, the direct subject of this sketch, was the third born in a family of nine children.  His schooling was somewhat limited and was obtained in Galesville and in Melrose, Jackson County.  He began to work out on farms at the early age of ten years, living at home a part of the time and continued to do so for a number of years.  At the age of 22, having saved money, he bought land.  When 25 he married and later purchased a farm near Ettrick, which he operated for about four years.  He then sold it and bought his present place of 176 acres, less than two miles from the city limits of Galesville.  On this he has made a number of valuable improvements, having erected modern buildings, including a fine barn, which is one of the best in this locality.  He is carrying on a good dairying business and is also engaged in breeding Guernsey cattle successfully, having selected this as his favorite stock.

Nov. 8, 1883, Mr. Hammond was united in marriage with Mary Speier, who was born at Spring Prairie, Wolworth [sic] County, Wis., daughter of Jacob and Josephine (Langenohl) Speier.  Her parents were natives of Germany, who came to Trempealeau County from Walworth County, having previously resided at Green Bay.  On coming here they settled in Gale Township, about four miles from Galesville, and farmed for a number of years before their death.  Mr. and Mrs. Hammond are the parents of seven children:  Mary Josephine, wife of George Kells, a contractor and builder residing in Gale Township; Christine G., wife of Ben Deeren, proprietor of a bicycle and motorcycle repair shop in Winona, Minn.; Lois Jeanette, unmarried, and a teacher in Trempealeau County; Lawrence Jacob, who married Nellie Eng and resided on the Hammond farm, assisting his father; Warren Lewis, unmarried, and living at home; and John and Vilas, who died in infancy.  Mr. Hammond and his family are affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal  In politics he is an independent Republican, but, like his father, has never taken an active part in public affairs, being content with casting his vote.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 413 - 414

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E. J. Hankey, who for a number of years was the leading merchant of Trempealeau Village, where he is now living retired, was born in Czarnikow, Province of Posen, Prussia, Germany, Nov. 17, 1844, and there resided until he was 10 years old. When he was 5 years old his father died, and about 1852 his mother married for her second husband a Mr. Maschke. In 1854 the family came to America, landing at Quebec, Canada, from which city they came directly to Wisconsin, locating at Beaver Dam, Dodge County. Here Mr. Maschke found work at his trade of cabinet-maker, and was thus employed there for the rest of his life. When no longer able to work he went to live with his daughter Celia, who was the wife of Charles Owen, a farmer, living near Fox Lake, and there died about 1899, when 80 years of age. This daughter and her husband are still living, Celia being 58 years old. There was another daughter, Minnie, who died about 1892 or 1893, at Beaver Dam, Wis.

E. J. Hankey was the first-born son by his mother's first marriage. He attended common school in Germany from the age of 5 to that of 10 years, and being an apt pupil, was well advanced in the common branches for his years when he came to America. Subsequently he attended school at Beaver Dam, in which city he resided until he was 24 years old. At the age of 17 he began working as clerk for J. H. & D. Newman, who kept a general merchandise store in Beaver Dam, dealing, however, principally in dry goods, and he continued in the employ of this firm until he came to Trempealeau early in 1868. On arriving here he at once formed a partnership with Thomas Veltum, and under the firm name of Hankey & Veltum they started business on Front street, dealing in groceries, crockery and notions. This partnership continued until 1873, when Mr. Hankey sold out to Mr. Veltum. A year later, however, the partnership was renewed and continued until 1878, in which year the subject of this sketch bought out his partner, the latter going to St. James, Minn. Mr. Hankey remained on Front street until 1888, and then moved to a new store he had erected on the west side of Main street, one block north of the river. This was a two-story brick block, with basement, 34 by 70 feet in ground dimensions. It was built by Charles Thomas, of Trempealeau, and was the best and largest block in the village. While on Front street, however, Mr. Hankey had made a removal from his first location, a block east of the Melchoir place, to a double building about half a block further east, so that this was his second removal. When he took possession of his Main street store he enlarged his business, and it continued to grow during the many subsequent years that he was its proprietor. During the winter of 1913-14 Mr. Hankey's health began to decline, and as he no longer felt able to give that close attention to his business which he felt it required, he resolved to retire, and accordingly sold out in January, 1914, to the Trempealeau Mercantile Company, though retaining ownership of the building. Throughout his long commercial career he strove not only for personal success, but also to advance the general interests of the community, taking a leading part in every progressive movement, and it is largely owing to him and to a few other men of like public spirit that Trempealeau is today one of the most prosperous villages of its size in this part of the State. During his business career Mr. Hankey passed through two serious fires, having to move his stock both times, but sustained no material loss. He adheres to the principles of the Republican party, but was never personally active in politics. As a good citizen, however, he rendered service for a number of years as a member of the board of education, and was its secretary at the time the high school addition was made to the village school.

Mr. Hankey was married, Dec. 16, 1868, to Mary Frances, daughter of Thomas and Caroline McCune, of Beaver Dam, Wis., at which place theirwedding occurred. She was born there July 14, 1848, and died at Trempealeau, Wis., March 4, 1900, after a happy married life of over 31 years. After coming to Trempealeau, which they did immediately after their marriage, they boarded for a short time, subsequently beginning housekeeping on East Third street. They had two sons: William T., born Oct. 10, 1869, and Adelbert G., born Feb. 4, 1876. The latter died April 7, 1887. William T. is now engaged in the drug business in Cleveland, Ohio, to which city he went in 1894. He married Nellie Barker, of Cleveland, and has four children: Howard B., Ruth, Helen and William T., Jr.

Mr. Hankey was reared in the Lutheran faith, but is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, which he has served as trustee. He is a member also of Trempealeau Lodge, No. 117, A. F. & A. M., of Trempealeau, having joined the order while living in Beaver Dam. He resides with an adopted daughter, Mrs. J. W. Johnston, who is the wife of John W. Johnston, a pioneer in telephone construction work in western Wisconsin, their marriage taking place June 24, 1901. Mrs. Hankey during her life was very active in church work and benevolent enterprises, and was a woman loved and respected by young and old.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 378 - 379

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Lars Mikkleson Hansaasen, an early settler in Ettrick Township, where he is now living, was born in Ringsaker, Norway, April 27, 1837. He was married in his native land in September, 1858, and with his wife, Goner, who was born in the same part of Norway in March, 1836, came to the United States in 1862, locating on a farm in Lewis Valley, La Crosse County, Wis. About three years later they removed to Ettrick Township, Trempealeau County, Mr. Hansaasen homesteading a farm on Beaver Creek, where he is still living, after spending half a century in its cultivation and improvement. The farm is now owned by his son-in-law, Alexander J. Ekern, who bought it. Mr. and Mrs. Hansaasen reared six children, their daughter Clara being the wife of Mr. Ekern, above mentioned, and another daughter, Lena, marrying Nicholas Enghagen.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 423

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Edwin C. Hanson, of the firm of Hanson & Johnson, hardware and implement dealers of Blair, is a native of the village where he now lives, having been born April 9, 1881, son of Christ C. and Bertha (Peterson) Blair, the former of whom, a retired merchant now living in Blair, came to America in 1869, and found his way directly to Trempealeau County.  Edwin C. Hanson remained at home until 20 years of age, and then became timekeeper in an iron mine at Ely, Minn.  Returning to Blair, he clerked for a number of years in the store of G. L. Solberg.  Sept. 12, 1912, he purchased the hardware stock of F. L. Immel, and on Jan. 1, 1913, the implement stock of A. B. Peterson, carrying on the joint business under his own name until Jan. 20, 1915, when he took Oscar B. Johnson as a partner under the firm name of Hanson & Johnson.  May 1, 1916, they purchased the building on the corner of Broadway and Gilbert Street, and have since carried on business there.  The structure is a brick-veneered building, 28 by 64 feet, two-story with a basement, steam heated and modern throughout, and the firm carries a complete line of goods, being known far and wide for its reasonable prices and honest dealings.  Mr. Hanson has done good service on the village council for six years.  His fraternal relations are with the Modern Woodmen, the Sons of Norway and the Beavers.  The family faith is that of the Norwegian Lutheran church.  Mr. Hanson was married Oct. 30, 1907, to Helga Olson, born in Hale Township, Aug. 8, 1880, daughter of Ole C. and Martha (Paulson) Hanson, the former of whom came from Norway in 1869.  Mr. and Mrs. Hanson had three children: Bessie, who died in infancy; Corinne, born Nov. 20, 1910, and Helen E., born Oct. 20, 1914.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 575

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Henry M. Hanson, who is profitably engaged in operating the Beswick farm of 100 acres in section 17, Preston Township, was born March 6, 1873, son of Martin and Olea (Stutrud) Hanson. The father, whose full name, in accordance with the Norwegian system of family nomenclature, was Martin Hanson Skyrud, was born in Norway, Jan. 10, 1836, and came to America April 27, 1862. He settled on land in section 17, Preston Township, Trempealeau County, Wis., and engaged in agriculture, undergoing all the hardships of pioneer hfe, but in time developing a good farm. Here he died Sept. 5, 1912. His wife Olea, who was born in Norway, Dec. 30, 1836, died April 4, 1892. They had a family of 13 children: Dorthea, born Nov. 11, 1860. who died July 21, 1862; Henry, born Dec. 5, 1862, who died Dec. 6. 1863; Morris, born April 1, 1864, who is now registrar of deeds of Trempealeau County; Karen Dorthea, born Aug. 30, 1865, who married Albert J. Halvorson, a farmer near Blair, now deceased, and died Dec. 1, 1900 ; Hannah Berthine, born Feb. 14, 1868, wife of P. T. Herreid, a hardware merchant of Blair; Marie, born Oct. 31, 1869, who died Oct. 31, 1873; Madts, born June 26, 1871, a farmer living near Blair; Marie Ohve, bom April 2, 1875, who is a trained nurse in Chicago; Clara Thine, born Nov. 1, 1876, who married Joseph Johnson, a railroad employee of Superior, Wis.; Alph Lawrence, born Nov. 21, now proprietor of a general store at Sonora, Minn.; Theodore, born April 5, 1881, now a farmer near Blair, and Tilda Rosiana, born June 23, 1883, who married Joseph Halvorson, a dentist of Galesville, Wis. Henry M. Hanson resided at home and worked for his father on the farm in section 17, Preston Township, until his marriage, Feb. 22, 1903, to Susan E. Beswick, daughter of Chester and Anjenette (Thurston) Beswick. He then took charge of the farm on which he is now living, for his wife's father, and has since operated it successfully. It is well improved and provided with a fine eight-room residence, large barns and other necessary buildings. A sketch of the Beswick family may be found elsewhere in this volume.  Mr. and Mrs. Hanson have an adopted son, Everett Beswick Hanson. One son, Ralph, born Sept. 17, 1906, died same day.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 464 - 465

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James Hanson was brought to Trempealeau County as a baby, and has lived on his present farm in Arcadia Township since 1896. During his residence here he has taken his part in the progress of the community by developing a good place, and he is regarded as one of the thrifty men of the neighborhood. He was born not far from Christiania, Norway, April 25, 1870, the son of Hans and Maren (Sorlie) Hanson. The father having died in 1871, the mother brought her baby son to America, a few weeks later, and took up her home with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Sorlie, who had previously brought the other members of the family to America and homesteaded 160 acres of land in Lake's Coulie, Arcadia Township, this county. After Kving with her parents for a while, the young widow married Hans Tolloken of French Creek, Newcomb's Valley, Arcadia Township. James Hanson was reared in the home of his stepfather and grandparents, helped about the farm and attended the district schools. At the age of sixteen years he started out for himself and was variously employed, working in the forests of Jackson and Clark Counties in the winters, running logs in the spring and working on farms in the summers. When he was twenty-six years old he married and soon thereafter acquired 160 acres in Newcomb's Valley, Arcadia Township. This land had been partly improved and a small frame house, together with a straw-covered shed for stock had been erected. To this home he brought his bride, and began to develop and improve the farm, which now consists of 280 acres, 120 acres having been added on the east side. Soon after moving on the place Mr. Hanson replaced the small house with a sightly twelve-roomed house, which is still the family home. It is connected with the neighbors' houses by the line of the Farmers' Telephone Company, in which Mr. Hanson is a stockholder. Other buildings have been erected as necessity has required, until the improvements now consist of good barns, a granary, tool house, stock sheds and the like, all in the best of condition. Running water from sparkling springs plentifully supplies the house and barns. On this excellent place Mr. Hanson carries on general farming and stockraising, having a good grade of Shorthorn cattle. In addition to this he has operated a threshing outfit for the past twenty-five years. Mr. Hanson was married May 21, 1896, to Anna Christianson, the daughter of Arndt and Caroline Christenson of Preston Township, and this union has been blessed with eight children: Alfred, born Jan. 3, 1897; William, Dec. 29, 1898; Cornelia (deceased); Arthur, Feb. 6, 1904; Isabelle, June 6, 1906; Myrtle, Jan. 23, 1909; Hazel, Jan. 23, 1911; James, May 4, 1914. The family attends the Fagerness Lutheran church, only a few miles away.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 681

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Johannes P. Hanson, agriculturist, creamery secretary, man of affairs and former county clerk, is not only one of the leading residents of Albion Township, but also one of the best known men in the county. He is affable, genial and official, the friend of every worthy cause and a valuable and useful citizen in every respect. He was born in Vaage, Gulbrandsdalen, Norway, March 21, 1863, son of Peter and Anna (Risdal) Hanson), who brought him to Trempealeau County in 1869. He was reared to farm pursuits and in 1891, in partnership with his brother Sven, took over the home farm. His acquaintance and popularity increased from his early boyhood, his abilities became widely known, and in 1904 he was elected county clerk, taking office Jan. 1, 1905, and serving two terms. In this capacity he more than justified the faith of his friends, and conducted the affairs of the office with general satisfaction to the voters. Upon retiring from office he took up his home on his present farm in Albion Township. Mr. Hanson has also at various times rendered other public service. He was town clerk of Unity Township for nine years and clerk of Albion Township four years, being appointed jury commissioner in 1909 and still holding that office. He also served as school clerk in Unity Township three years. In addition to his direct farming interests Mr. Hanson has been secretary of Unity Co-operative Creamery in Strum since 1909. He is a director of the First State Bank of Strum, and a member of its examining board, and is financial secretary of Branch No. 30, I. S. W. A., at Strum. June 10, 1903, Mr. Hanson was married to Toline Veggum of Mt. Horeb, Wis., who was born at that place Aug. 21, 1870. Her parents were Hans and Gunhild (Ramlet) Veggum, the father now residing on the Hanson farm with his daughter and son-in-law, his wife having died Dec. 26, 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Hanson have one child, Alice Gertrude, who was born May 25, 1907. The family are members of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, Mr. Hanson being vice-president of the congregation at Strum.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 656

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Lars Hanson, who was the first Norwegian settler to locate in Newcomb Valley, Arcadia Township, was born in the northern part of Norway, July 15, 1840, son of Hans and Anna Nelson. In June, 1864, he was married in his native land to Sarah, daughter of Peter and Cassie Peterson, and in 1866 they came to America together. Landing in Quebec, Canada, they came from that city to Winona, Minn., in the vicinity of which place they spent the winter of 1866-67. In the following summer they removed to Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, and in 1868 homesteaded 160 acres of wild land in sections 28 and 29, Newcomb Valley. Their resources were very limited, as they had arrived in Winona with but 50 cents in money, but during their stay there Mr. Hanson had worked at whatever he could find to do and managed to make a living and also earn enough to enable them to make a start on their Wisconsin farm. Still they had to be extremely economical. One of the first things Mr. Hanson did on taking possession of his homestead was to build a dugout, with sod roof, in the side of a hill, and he then began the grubbing of the farm. At the end of the first year he built a small log house with no floor, into which they moved, and here they lived for a number of years. When they came to the valley Arcadia had but one store and a small grist mill, and Mr. Hanson often carried flour and provisions home on his back—a distance of seven miles. Perhaps the greatest feat he accomplished in this line, however, was carrying their first cook stove across the country, on his back, for three and a half miles. Such energy and perseverance, which he displayed in all his operations, were bound to produce results, which became visible in the gradual improvement of his farm and an increasing prosperity. In 1885 he built the frame house that now stands on the farm, and from time to time he erected barns and other necessary buildings. After residing here until the spring of 1901, Mr. Hanson moved with his family to Blair, Wis., where he resided until the fall of 1902. He then returned to the farm and did not leave it again until 1907, in which year he sold the old home to his son Sam and bought a small house about a mile east, to which he moved and where he is now living. When he left the farm he had about 60 acres under plow. Mr. Hanson was a stockholder in the now defunct co-operative creamery at Blair, its failure causing him a pecuniary loss. On the whole, however, he has been successful and is a man highly respected in this part of the county. He believes in the principles of the Prohibition party, but has never held ofiice. He and his wife have had six children : Louis, who lives at East Grand Forks, Minn.; Sine, now Mrs. Fred Payne of Arcadia Village; Josephine, wife of Louis Gilbertson of Blair, Wis.; Samuel, who resides on the old homestead, and two others, who died in infancy.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 684 - 685

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Morris Hanson, register of deeds of Trempealeau County, was born at Blair, this county, April 1, 1864, son of Martin and Olia (Stuterud) Hanson, natives of Norway.  The father, born at Soler, Norway, came to America in 1862, settling in Blair, where he became a highly respected citizen, being a member and trustee of the United Norwegian Lutheran Church.  He died Sept. 5, 1912, at the age of 77 years.  His wife, to whom he was married in Norway, died in 1896 at the age of 53.  They had a large family of 13 children, of whom nine are now living.  Morris Hanson, who was the third born child in the family, remained at home until 1897, and then began to work out.  He attended business college at La Crosse one year, and in 1890 found employment in a general store in Blair, remaining with the firm seven years.  He then became a partner in the firm of Halverson, Hanson & Co., general merchants of Blair, and was thus occupied until 1910. In the fall of 1912, having by this time become widely known and respected, he was elected to the office of registrar of deeds, and was re-elected in the fall of 1914.  He has devoted a considerable part of his time to the public service, as he was a member of the village council of Blair for 10 years, being president one year, and was clerk of the Blair school board four years.  Aside from his present occupation he is a stockholder in the Home Bank of Blair.  Mr. Hanson was married Sept. 9, 1891, to Lena Halvorson, who was born in Blair, Wis., May 9, 1866, daughter of Nels and Turi (Newland) Halvorson.  The father, who was a farmer, was a native of Norway, came to America in 1855 and took a homestead about two miles east of Blair.  He died in 1912 at the age of 78 years.  His wife died in 1913 at the age of 72.  Mr. and Mrs. Hanson have five children:  Verna, a graduate of Stevens Point normal school, who is now a teacher in the sixth grade at Waterloo, Iowa; Edna, also a graduate of Stevens Point normal school, and a teacher in domestic science at Mukwanogo, Wis.; Mendez, assistant cashier in Trempealeau Valley State Bank at Taylor, Jackson County, Wis.; Dagna and Donald, residing at home.  Mr. Hanson belongs to the Independent Order of Foresters, and he and his family are members of the United Lutheran Church.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 545 - 546

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Odell Hanson, a general farmer in sections 26-27, Gale Township, where he has 295 acres of land, was born in this township, March 14, 1881, son of Ole P. and Carrie (Peterson) Hanson. His parents were natives of Norway, the father born in Krageru, March 13, 1843, and the mother in Biri, Oct. 3, 1851. Their marriage took place in this country. Ole P. Hanson came to the United States during the Civil War and settled in Wisconsin. For a number of years he worked in a saw mill near Black River Falls. At the time of his marriage, about 1876, he located on a farm on Hardie's Creek, Gale Township, Trempealeau County, where his son Hans now hves and with whom Mr. and Mrs. Hanson now reside. Odell Hanson was the fourth born of his parents' eight children. He attended the Grant school in his boyhood and began working out for others at the age of 16 years and was thus occupied for about nine years. For one year he was engaged in hauling cream, after which he farmed for seven years. At the end of that time he bought his present farm, which was known as the old Hardie farm, and on which he raises most of the crops cultivated in this section. He is also a stockholder in the Farmers' Exchange and the La Crosse Packing Company. Nov. 7, 1910, Mr. Hanson was married to Clara Anderson, who was born in Long Coolie, La Crosse County, Wis., daughter of Anton and Agnes (Evenson) Anderson. Her parents, natives of Norway, came to this country in 1880, locating on Beaver Creek, Ettrick Township, this county, where Mr. Anderson engaged in farming and where he still lives. Mr. and Mrs. Hanson have three children: Elmer Oscar, Kelmer Alton and Clinton, all residing at home. The family are members of the Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Hanson is independent.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 362 - 363

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Ole C. Hanson dates his residence in Trempealeau County from 1870, when he was brought to Irvin's Coulie, Lincoln County, by his parents, Hans and Bertha (Nelson) Arneson, who the year previous had brought him from Norway, where he was born Sept. 23, 1853. As a young man he did farm work, and for a while was employed in a sawmill at Eau Claire, Wisconsin. In 1884 he purchased his present place of 80 acres in section 29, Pigeon Township, where he successfully carries on general farming. His financial holdings include stock in the Peoples State Bank of Whitehall, the Pigeon Grain & Stock Company of Whitehall, and the Preston Creamery at Blair. His public work has included service as clerk of the school board since 1904. Since 1890 he has been secretary of the Norwegian Luthern Chuch [sic] at Whitehall. Mr. Hanson was married, Dec. 30, 1882, to Olena Hanevold, who was born in Toten, Norway, Feb. 22, 1862, daughter of Ole and Andrena Hanevold, who in 1873 came to Fly Creek, in Pigeon Township, and here spent the remainder of their lives, the former dying in 1914 and the latter in 1894. Mr. and Mrs. Hanson have had eleven children, of whom two died in infancy. Heldor is a farmer in Dunn County, Wisconsin. Adolph is a clerk at Whitehall. Matilda is the wife of Hans Svaie of Church's Ferry, North Dakota. Carl, Lewis, Melvin, Louise and Otto are at home. Emma died March 19, 1917, at the age of eleven years. Hans Arneson, father of Ole C. Hanson, was born in Norway, Oct. 22, 1807, came to America in 1869, lived in Dane County, this state, a year, and then came to this county, where he settled in Irvin's Coulie, in Lincoln Township. In 1884 he sold his place, and took up his home with his son, Hans Arneson, where he died Jan. 6, 1896, his wife, Bertha Nelson, who was born in Norway, Sept. 22, 1813, dying on Dec. 14, 1900.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 443 - 444

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Peter Hanson, for many years a prominent resident of the county, was born on the estate known as Bjornstad, Vaage Gulbrandsdalen, in 1826, and became a farmer. As a young man he married Anna Risdal, who was born in 1829. The emigration of the family to America took place in 1869, Coral City, Trempealeau County, Wis., being selected as their place of settlement. There they remained, however, but six months, and then removed to section 33, Unity Township, where Mr. Hanson bought a tract of railroad land and started farming. In this occupation he continued on the same farm until his death in 1898, but which time he had improved his property to a large extent and was a prosperous citizen. His wife died in 1911. Their children were: Sven (deceased), Johannes P., Peter, Jr., of Strum, Torger (deceased), Hans (deceased) and Martinus (deceased).

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 656

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Samuel Hanson, son of Lars and Sarah (Peterson) Hanson, was born in Newcomb Valley, Arcadia Township, Trempealeau County, Wis., Nov. 17, 1876. He was educated in the district school, which he attended regularly until the age of 12 years, and from 12 to 16 during the winters only. As soon as he was old enough he began to help his father on the farm, and continued as the latter's assistant until he rented the homestead in 1902, and started in for himself. In 1906 it became his by purchase. He has improved the buildings and built a new granary and a garage. To the 120 acres of the original farm he has added 80 more, thus enlarging the farm to 200 acres. It lies in a fertile region, the surface of the land being rolling, and he carries on both general fai-ming and dairying. Aside from these immediate interests he is a stockholder in the La Crosse Packing Company, the Arcadia Farmers Co-operative Creamery, and the Farmers Telephone Company. Mr. Hanson was married, Sept. 7, 1907, to Minnie, daughter of Olaf and Carrie Moe of Newcomb Valley, and their children are: Celia, born July 17, 1909; Sadie, born Feb. 24, 1910; Milton, born April 23, 1912; and Ivan, born Oct. 30, 1914. In politics Mr. Hanson is a staunch Republican. He has served as township assessor three years, was clerk of the district school board for a number of years, and took the United States census in 1900. He belongs to Arcadia camp, Modern Woodmen of America and he and his family are members of Fagerness Lutheran church, of which his father was one of the founders. Enterprising and energetic, he is getting along in the world and has won the esteem of his neighbors.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 685 - 686

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Theodore M. Hanson, who is aiding in developing the agricultural resources of Preston Township, as proprietor of Clear Mound Farm, consisting of 100 acres in section 20, was born on this farm, April 5, 1881. His parents were Martin Hanson Skyrud and Olea Stutterud, a memoir of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Theodore M. Hanson resided at home with his parents and worked on the home farm until 1908. Then at the age of 27 years he became a general merchant, opening a store at Waldorf, Minn., which he conducted until 1912. He then sold out and returned to the Hanson homestead. Here he is successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits, dairying and stock raising, his farm being well improved, having fertile soil, capable of producing all the crops indigenous to this region, and his buildings substantial, convenient and supplied with all necessary equipment. Besides operating this farm, Mr. Hanson is secretary of the Blair Elevator Company and a stockholder in the Home Bank of Blair. Though not politically active, he is alive to the general interests of the community in which he lives and ever ready to support any good, practical measure for its advancement. Mr. Hanson was married Sept. 7, 1904, to Helen Grinde, of Beaver Creek Valley, Trempealeau County, where she was born Jan. 15, 1883, daughter of Lars L. and Helga (Hilleboe) Grinde. Her father was born in Norway in 1847 and came to the United States with his parents in 1856, they settling in Presfon Township. Mr. Grinde became a very prominent citizen in the county, serving as county treasurer four years and as a member of the State legislature two years. He was also at different times a member of the township and county boards.
His wife Helga was born in 1850 and died in 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. Hanson have had six children born to them: Lucile Theodora, born June 23, 1907, who died April 16, 1908; Martin Grinde, born Oct. 10, 1909; Sylvia Helen, born Aug. 16, 1911; Dorothy Lucile, born Feb. 23, 1914 ; Mildred Louise, born Sept. 30, 1915, and George Anthony, born July 12, 1917.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 526 - 527

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La Verd Ernest Hardie, proprietor of a good farm in sections 20 and 29, Gale Township, was born at Mindoro, La Crosse County, Wis., Nov. 2, 1880, son of Andrew and Catherine (Becker) Hardie. The father, Andrew Hardie, who was born in Scotland, came to the United States in 1854, locating first in Maryland. He then came to Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, settling at Glasgow, Gale Township, where he engaged in farming. After residing there for a number of years, he returned to Mindoro, but later coming back to Trempealeau County, he settled in Ettrick Township. Still later he returned to the old farm in Glasgow and lived there until 1912, when he retired and took up his residence in Galesville, where he and his wife are now living.

La Verd E. Hardie was the second-born child in a family of four. He attended school in Ettrick and Glasgow, and also was a student for two years at the State Agricultural College at Madison. He resided on the home farm until 1905, in which year he purchased his present property--a farm of 157 acres—on which he has made all the improvements now standing, having also brought the land into a high state of cultivation. In addition to general farming, he engaged in dairying, keeping high grade Guernsey cattle, which he breeds from pure-bred bulls. Mr. Hardie is also a stockholder in the Co-operative Packing Company of La Crosse and in the Farmers' Elevator Company of Galesville. He is a member of several fraternal orders, including the Beavers, Yeomen, Odd Fellows and Modern Woodmen of America. He was married June 5, 1907, to Sara F. Daniels, who was born at Plymouth, Pa., daughter of Frederick and Agnes (Noble) Daniels, her father being a native of Pennsylvania and her mother of Scotland. Frederick Daniels was connected with the coal mining business in his native state, and while employed as hoisting engineer was accidentally killed when his daughter Sara was a child of 14 months. His wife, the latter's mother, is still living and resides in Plymouth, Pa. The family stood high in the community in which they lived, Mrs. Daniels being superintendent of the Presbyterian Sunday school. Mr. and Mrs. Hardie have many friends and acquaintances in this part of the county. They are members of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics Mr. Hardie is an independent Republican. He has never sought public office, but has always supported good candidates in the local field and been ready to lend his aid and influence to any movement calculated to advance the general interests of the community.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 369 - 370

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Claud Harrison Hare, proprietor of a dairy and stock farm of 160 acres in section 12, Gale Township, was born in Trempealeau Township, this county, Oct. 6, 1888, son of William and Aurilla (Hovell) Hare.  His parents were natives of Wisconsin, the father born in La Crosse County, Sept. 4, 1860, and the mother in Trempealeau County, Oct, 31, 1870.  William Hare became a land owner in this county in 1887 and has always been a farmer.  He still resided on his old homestead of 180 acres and is one of the active agriculturalists of his township.  He and his wife have been the parents of four children.  Claud H. was the first born.  Claud H. Hare in his boyhood attended District School No. 13, which was located on his father's farm.  He learned agriculture under his father's tuition and lived at home until he was 20 years of age.  He then worked on a dairy farm for two years, afterward moving to Galesville, where he resided for five months, during this period being engaged in operating a threshing outfit.  At the end of that time -- in December -- he rented the Harris farm in Big Tamarac and operated it until December, 1913, when he purchased his present farm of 160 acres of improved land.  This he is operating as a general dairy farm and stock farm, giving particular attention to the breeding of Durham cattle.  He is not active in politics, preferring to give his entire attention to his business, which is growing larger each year.  June 30, 1909, Mr. Hare was united in marriage with Mabel Harnslein, who was born at Frenchville, Trempealeau County, Wis., daughter of Andrew and Julia (Sagen) Harnslein.  Her father, who also was born at Frenchville, this county, and raised there, was a traveling salesman up tot he time of his death, Nov. 4, 1911.  His wife, Mrs. Hare's mother, who is a sister of Ole Sagen, of Galesville, was born in Norway, Sept. 6, 1862.  Mrs. Hare was educated in Trempealeau County, attending the Galesville High School and also Gale College.  She and her husband are the parents of two children:  Lyle Fern and Ruth Mae.  Mr. Hare's fraternal society affiliations are with the Yeomen and the Modern Woodmen of America.  He and his family stand high in the community and have a wide circle of friends.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 576 - 577

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William E. Harlow, one of the proprietors of the Harlow & Herrell garage, at Whitehall, Wis., was born in Pigeon Township, Trempealeau County, Wis., Dec. 6, 1872, son of 0. F. and Lucy (Kidder, nee Scott) Harlow. He made his home with his father until he was 24 years old and then learned the painter's trade, at which he worked in Whitehall until 1916. He then became a member of the firm of Harlow & Herrell, and in June they opened their present garage, a one-story frame building, 28 by 86 feet, on Scranton Street. Here they do all kinds of repairing and handle all supplies and accessories. With the increasing popularity of the automobile, their business is bound to grow, and they have already made an auspicious start. Mr. Harlow also has a knowledge of electrical work, which is likely to be of use to him in the future. He is fraternally aflShated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. June 10, 1896, he was married to Florence M. Breed, of Whitehall, who was born Oct. 25, 1876, daughter of Calvin E. and Anna (Crane) Breed. Her father, now a retired farmer, is a military veteran. Mr. and Mrs. Harlow have one child,Eugene Scott, who was born Oct. 14, 1907.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 644

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Thomas Harmon. In reviewing the history of the notable pioneers of Trempealeau County those who have passed away must not be forgotten. Among them was Thomas Harmon, whom the older residents of Ettrick Township still remember as a good neighbor and reliable citizen, as well as the founder of one of the flourishing homesteads in the township. Mr. Harmon was born in County Louth, Ireland, in 1822, and was a young man when he came to the United States, being as yet unmarried. After a long voyage in a sailing vessel, he reached port. Landing at New Orleans his first work was turning a hand corn sheller at $3.00 a day, but on account of the cholera he removed to Illinois, where he worked in a factory. From there he proceeded to Walworth County, Wis., where, not long after, he was married at Lake Geneva to Julia Rafter, a native of Kilkenny, Ireland. About 1861 he came with his wife and two children, Andy and Katie, to Trempealeau County, making the journey in a covered wagon with ox team. Arriving here he located on land in Ettrick Township, which he owned in partnership with his brother John. Later he homesteaded 80 acres more. On his farm he built a frame shack and later a house of hewed logs, 16 by 24 feet, which was so well and substantially made that it is still occupied by the family. Here Thomas Harmon passed the rest of his life engaged in improving his farm, his death taking place May 3, 1887, when he had reached the age of 66 years. He served some time on the school board, and as a good Catholic helped to build the first church at Ettrick. His wife died March 6, 1904. Their children were: Andy, born, Sept. 14, 1857; Kate, now Mrs. James Kennedy of Morris, Minn.; James, born April 3, 1863; Mary, who is Mrs. S. Thompson and resides at Nome, Alaska; Bridget, wife of Tom Whalen of Ettrick Township, and Julia, who died Dec. 8, 1908. She always remained at home, assisting her mother, and after her mother's death she became housekeeper for the boys until her death. James and Andy are now the proprietors of the old homestead, on which they have made some valuable improvements, among other things erecting a good basement barn, 34 by 60 feet. Like their father, they are devout members of the Catholic Church. Neither have ever married.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 368

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Frank J. Hartman, now residing in La Crosse, Wis., is a native son of Trempealeau County, having been born in Arcadia Township, March 7, 1865. son of Henry and Augusta (Sheldon) Hartman. The father was born in Ohio, March 16, 1839, and came West with his parents in 1856, making the journey by train to Dubuque, Iowa, and from there by boat to Fountain City, Wis., and from Fountain City to "Bishop Settlement," now Arcadia, by ox team. His father, John P. Hartman, homesteaded 160 acres near Arcadia Village. It was wild land with no buildings on it, and the family had a hard time to procure the necessities of life, being often obliged to haul supplies from Fountain City on a hand sled. Mr. Hartman, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, worked with his sons, Philip and Henry, for the father of John Gavney, to earn foodstuffs. Henry Hartman was 17 years of age when he came to Trempealeau County, and he had to make himself useful on the farm and help his parents in various ways. In 1864, when 25 years old, he was married in Iowa to Augusta Sheldon, who was born in Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence County, N. Y., March 8, 1840, a daughter of Benjamin Sheldon. It was not until 1869, however, that Henry Hartman began farming for himself; in the meanwhile he lived on the parents' farm, except for his trip to Iowa, where he obtained his bride. When he started in for himself he bought 160 acres of land in Wickham Valley, between Arcadia and Independence, and here he remained for 14 years, engaged in developing his farm, transforming it in time into a good piece of agricultural property. In 1883 he rented the farm to Wilber Wickham and moved to East Arcadia, where he and his family hved for 10 years. Selling the above-mentioned farm in 1892, he bought one near Alma Center in the following year, which he lived on and worked for ten years. He then sold this farm and retired to a home that he built in Alma Center, where he and his wife resided till 1914, in which year they sold the residence and moved to Spokane, Wash., where they are now living with their son Howard. Their children were: Myrtle, born May 31, 1866, who was married in 1889 to Claud Higbee and is now residing with her husband at Whitepine, Mont.; Cora, born Feb. 13, 1868, who died unmarried at Alma Center, June 13, 1913; Howard, born May 2, 1873, now living in Spokane, Wash., where he is engaged in railroading; Bert, born March 7, 1881, who is a druggist at Eleva, Wis., and Frank J., of La Crosse. All the children were born in Trempealeau County. Frank J. Hartman in his youth attended the common schools and the Arcadia High School, from which he was graduated in 1887, subsequently teaching one winter in Sieger district, Trempealeau County. In the year of his graduation he entered the employ of the Holway Lumber Company, of North La Crosse, and remained with them as time keeper and clerk for three and a half years, being in the mill during the summers and in the woods during the winters. From October, 1890, to April, 1898, he held the position of hardware clerk with the W. P. Massuere Company. On July 4, 1892, the day on which the wagon bridge across the Mississippi River at Winona was dedicated, Mr. Hartman was married in that city to Cora A., daughter of John and Nancy (Frey) Danuser, of Fountain City, the Rev. Mr. Higbee, pastor of the Baptist church, officiating. They began housekeeping in Arcadia Village, where they lived until 1898, in which year Mr. Hartman went to Eleva and engaged in the hardware business, being thus occupied until 1913. He and his family then moved to Onalaska, where his son Cecil was attending the high school. In the following year, 1914, he moved to La Crosse and entered the employ of the Tausch Hardware Company, with which concern he is still connected. He and his wife have had three children, of whom two daughters died in infancy. The son, Cecil, was born in Arcadia, Aug. 5, 1895, and after passing through the graded school of Eleva, attended the Onalaska High School. Mr. Hartman is not active in politics, but votes the Republican ticket. He is a prosperous business man and has not lost his interest in his old home in Trempealeau County.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 536 - 538

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George M. and Walter R. Hass (see Walter R.'s bio below), who together are operating a good farm in section 19, Gale Township, are sons of Samuel and Marie (Dieko) Hass, natives of Germany. The father, Samuel Hass, born in Pommern, Germany, Dec. 9, 1844, was the son of a clergyman, and came to this country when 12 years of age, settling in Mormon Coolie, La Crosse County, Wis. where he was reared to manhood. For many years the family lived near the city. In 1874 Mr. Hass was married to Marie Dieko, who was born in Germany, Jan. 9, 1845. He continued to reside in La Crosse County until 1905, in which year he moved with his family to Trempealeau County, settling on the Duncan Wright farm, where they lived and prospered, a happy, thrifty family, until Mr. Hass's death in November, 1910. Mr. Hass was a man of sterling character and was esteemed wherever known. While residing in La Crosse County, he served as assessor for nine years and as supervisor one year. He and his wife had eight children, seven of whom are now living: John and Mary Hass, Mrs. Anderegg and Mrs. Adolph Schilling live in or near La Crosse, George, Walter and Sophia are at home.

George M. Hass was born in Shelby Township, La Crosse County, March 18, 1875, being the third born of his parents' family. He attended district school No. 3 in his native township and the German school in that locality one winter. Until 1911 he resided at home with his parents and then he and his brother, Walter R., purchased the farm on which they now Uve, and which contains 155 acres of land. They are engaged in general farming and dairying, keeping a number of high grade cattle and various other kinds of stock. Their farm is well equipped with suitable buildings and is kept in excellent condition. The brothers also own a threshing outfit and engage in threshing and silo filling for others, devoting their entire time to agricultural work in its various branches. Their mother resides with them on the farm. The family faith is that of the Lutheran Church.

Walter R. Hass was born Oct. 30, 1887, was educated in the rural schools of La Crosse County, resided at home until 1911, when as above stated he purchased with his brother, George M., their present farm. Sophia was born June 6, 1885, and attended the rural schools of La Crosse County and the La Crosse high school, and for six years was a proficient teacher in the rural school of La Crosse County. She is now keeping house for her brothers and mother.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 374

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Ole Haug, proprietor of Haug Farm of 260 acres, in section 25, Lincoln Township, and section 30, Pigeon Township, was born at Holmen, La Crosse County, Wis., Dec. 12, 1877, son of Peter O. and Augusta Haug. The father, who was born in Norway, came to America with his parents in 1855, they locating in La Crosse County, Wis. There he was reared, and there he lived until March, 1896, when he bought the farm on which his son Ole now resides, which he cultivated until his death in 1902 at the age of 49 years. His wife, who was born near Holmen, Wis., is still living on the farm, being now 61 years old. They had three children: Ole, Amalia, who lives on the homestead, and Smith, who died in 1907, at the age of 21 years. Ole Haug assisted his father on the farm until the latter's death in 1902, after which he operated it for his mother until 1908. He then purchased it and has since been the sole owner. He has 55 head of cattle, mixed grades, milking 20 cows, and keeps 100 hogs per year. The farm has good buildings, including a two-story, eight-room, frame house with basement, equipped with furnace heat, and modern in every respect, except lights. His barn, 36 by 94 by 18 feet in dimensions, has a good basement with cement floors, steel stanchions and litter-carrier, cement mangers, watering buckets, hog house, 24 by 30 feet, frame with cement floors. Mr. Haug was married, November, 1902, to Mina Tharaldson, of Pigeon Township, who was born in La Crosse, Wis., daughter of John and Theoline (Suggerud) Tharaldson. Her father was a native of Norway. Mr. and Mrs. Haug have three children: Palmer, Agnes and Tilman, the two latter being twins.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 638

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Thomas H. Hauge, a well known and prosperous farmer of Hale Township, proprietor of a farm of 240 acres in sections 24 and 35, is, like many other successful men in his line of work, a native of Norway, having been born in Hitterdal, that country, July 20, 1859. His father, Harold Aslakson, came to America in 1869, locating in Arcadia Township, this county, where he homesteaded a farm. He thus followed close on the heels of the pioneers and had much the same experiences, the surroundings at that time being more or less primitive and the work of developing a homestead one of long toil and occasional privation. Harold Aslakson was, however, adapted by nature and disposition to succeed, and in time his industry and perseverance brought their due reward in a flourishing and profitable farm on which he resided until his death in the spring of 1892. His first wife, whose maiden name was Karen Tostenson Gunnem, died in Norway in 1861, and he married for his second wife, in Dane County, Wisconsin, in 1869, Asslan Johnson, who died in 1890. Thomas H. Hauge, who was initiated at an early age into agricultural methods, worked on his parents' homestead for some time in his youth. He then for seven years and a half operated a farm for F. C. Allen of Eau Claire, which was located in Arcadia Township. At the end of that period he bought a farm in Bruce Valley, Hale Township, on which he resided until 1909. It is now operated by his son-in-law, Oscar Hanke, and his son, Melvin Hauge. Upon leaving his farm in 1909 Mr. Hauge purchased his present farm. In the same year he built the house in which he now resides, a two-story and basement cement brick veneer structure of 12 rooms, heated by furnace and lighted by electricity, the same lighting system being used in all his buildings. The barn was rebuilt in 1912, and is a frame structure, 50 by 72 by 20 feet, with cement floors. In 1913 Mr. Hauge erected a stave silo, 14 by 32 feet in size. He has a herd of 31 graded Holstein cattle, of which he milks 20, and also raises Buff Orpington chickens. Aside from his farm interests he is a stockholder in the Pigeon Grain & Stock Company. For four years he has served as township treasurer. Mr. Hauge was married, July 23, 1882, to Anna Olson, who was born at Tamarack, Ettrick Township, Dec. 25, 1866, daughter of Andrew H. and Olive (Gilbertson) Olson. Her father, born in Norway in 1836, died March 7, 1908, in Arcadia, having come to America in 1852. Her mother was born in Norway in 1828 and died May 14, 1900. Mr. and Mrs. Hauge have had a large family, numbering 15 children, of whom all are living but one. They are as follows: Carrie, who is the wife of Sever Williamson, a farmer of Hale Township, and has one child, Walter; Henry, a farmer of Hale Township, who married Mary Johnson and has two children: Marion and William ; Mary, wife of Oscar Hanke, also a Hale Township farmer, and the mother of two children: Marion and Florence; Melvin, who is farming in Hale Township; Clara, who was a teacher four years and is now the wife of Peter Enger, a farmer of this township; Annie, wife of Otto Olson, proprietor of the Commercial Hotel, Arcadia; Cora, who resides at home; Alma, who graduated from the La Crosse normal school and is now a teacher in Bruce Valley; Hartwick, living at home; Carl Alfred, who died at the age of one and a half years, and Agnes, Delia, Walter, Viola and Stella, all of whom are residing at home. Mr. Hauge and his family are members of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, of which he is also a trustee. As the son of an early settler of the county and himself a substantial and reliable citizen, he is widely known and highly esteemed.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 655 - 656

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Elizabeth Heald, one of the estimable women of Trempealeau County, has seen pioneer life in two states and four counties. She was born in New York City, Jan. 1, 1854, daughter of Alonzo Morris and Mary (Schuyler) Merwin, and a great-granddaughter, on her mother's side, of Gen. Philip Schuyler, of Revolutionary War fame. In the' fall of the year of her birth, the family came westward, and located at Greenbush, Sheboygan County, Wis., where they settled in the woods, and devoted three years to developing a farm. They cut down the trees, cleared up the land, erected a four-room house, and conducted pioneer farming on a small scale. Then they moved to Dodge County, in the same state where they rented a farm. From there the father, in 1862, went to Nicollet County, in Minnesota, not far from New Ulm, secured a tract of land, erected a cabin, and harvested a quantity of hay. Then he went back to his home, and thus escaped the massacre of August 18 of that year. In June, 1863, the family, consisting of the father, mother and five children, William, George, Elizabeth, Ida and Arvilla, set out for their new home with an ox team. To the parents the long trip entailed many hardships, but the children thoroughly enjoyed it, and met with delight the constantly changing landscape, and the many varied experiences. Upon reaching the claim, it was found that the cabin was almost a ruin and the hay gone, the place having apparently been visited both by the Indians and the fleeing whites during the terrible days of the massacre. The cabin was soon repaired, however, and before long a farm was started. Late in the fall of 1864 the family came back to Wisconsin, and settled on 43 acres at Centerville, in Trempealeau Township, this county. The land had been improved, but no buildings were standing thereon. The father built a frame house, and in this the family continued to live for many years. He died March 10, 1867, and the sons, William and George, assumed the responsibility of supporting the family. The mother lived for many years thereafter, and spent her declining years in Trempealeau Village, where she died Feb. 20, 1909, at over 91 years of age. The daughter, Elizabeth, the subject of this sketch, followed the family fortunes until her marriage. Feb. 7, 1886, she married William E. Heald, who lived on a farm about a half mile from Trempealeau Village. Since his death, Feb. 6, 1916, she has lived in Trempealeau Village with her only daughter, Gertrude Mae. Gertrude Mae Heald was born on the farm near Trempealeau Village, Oct. 26, 1886. After passing through the common schools she was graduated from the Trempealeau high school in June, 1906. Then for three years she taught in the rural schools of the county. In the fall of 1909 she entered the Winona Business College at Winona, and was duly graduated from the stenographic and bookkeeping departments. In 1910 she entered the employ of the Cooper & Graves Lumber Company at Trempealeau as bookkeeper; in 1913 she started work for the Galesville Lumber Company at Galesville; from the fall of 1914 to the fall of 1915 she was at home, and since then she has been with the Trempealeau Mercantile Company at Trempealeau.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 476 - 477

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Perry Heath, proprietor of a good farm of 320 acres in section 16, Arcadia Township, was born at Marengo, McHenry County, Ill., Oct. 26, 1843, son of Joel and Margaret (Miller) Heath. His parents, who were natives of New York state, migrated to Illinois about 1842, buying 80 acres of land at Marengo. After residing there until 1853 they moved to La Crosse County, Wisconsin, locating not far from where the village of Holmen now stands. Here the Heaths began farming on 160 acres of land, for which Mr. Heath had traded his Illinois property. In 1856 they returned to Illinois and remained three years, coming back to Wisconsin in 1859. The father came first, however, in order to get a settlement for the La Crosse county farm, for which it seems he had not been fully paid, and while here was taken sick and died, his body being returned to Illinois for burial. The widowed mother and her family then took up their residence on the La Crosse County farm, the subject of this sketch being then 16 years old, and here she lived until her death in 1868. There were eight children in the family: Lusetta, Oscar, Lydia Ann and Permelia, all of whom are now deceased; Perry, Barnabas, who is now residing at Strum, Trempealeau County; Emmett, deceased; Matilda, now Mrs. Charles Hilliard of Fargo, N. D. Perry Heath acquired his education in the district schools. After his father's death he remained at home with his widowed mother until he was 22 years old, at which time he purchased 40 acres adjoining the home farm in La Crosse County. Aug. 13, 1865, he married Jennie Briggs, daughter of Thomas and Phoebe Briggs of La Crosse County, and, building a house on his 40-acre farm, took his bride there and began housekeeping. After operating his farm for about four years, in 1869 he bought 160 acres of wild land in Lewis Valley, section 16, Arcadia Township, and built a small house on it, to which he moved his family, then consisting of his wife and two children, in addition to himself. The journey was made overland by horse team. Here Mr. Heath has since remained. He has greatly improved his property, the size of which he increased by purchasing 160 acres more, making a farm of 320 acres, 200 of which are under the plow, the balance consisting of timber land and pasture. In 1879 he built a comfortable frame house and in 1902 a good frame barn. In September, 1888, his first wife died. She had borne him eight children: Lusetta, born in 1866, who is now Mrs. John Busby of Fridley, Mont.; Elsie, born in 1869, now Mrs. Henry Smith of Whitehall, Wis.; Alonzo, born in 1871, who is now living in Osseo, Trempealeau County; Lela, born in 1874, wife of Frank Horsey of Utica, Minn.; Alvah, born in 1876, who is deceased; Lester, born in 1878, now living on the old farm; Chauncey, born in 1881, now residing in Arcadia Village, and Pearl, born in 1885, who is the wife of Grant Smith of Roundup, Mont. March 27, 1891, Mr. Heath married for his second wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Malcolm and Margaret Malles of Fountain City, Wis., and of this marriage there has been one child, Ervin, born in 1892, who is living at home. Mr. Perry is a Republican in politics and for many years has served as school director in his district. Aside from his own farming interests he holds stock in the Glencoe Co-operative Creamery of Arcadia Village. Though reared a Methodist, he is not at present a member of any church.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 787 - 788

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Even A. Hegge, prominent member of the county board from Pigeon Falls, is one of the influential men of the county, and has been unusually active in public affairs. His work on the town and county board has been of the highest order, and as an advocate of good roads he had done much to promote the best interests of the community at large. A native of this county, he was born on his present farm at the mouth of Hegge Valley, in Pigeon Township, Nov. 27, 1875. He attended school in the district of which his father was an official, and supplemented this with a course in the Wisconsin Business University at La Crosse. Thus equipped, he returned home and resumed agricultural operations. For a while he worked with his father, then he managed the farm, subsequently rented it, and still later acquired the ownership. The place consists of 290 acres in section 3, township 22, range 7, and has been made into a model farm in every particular. Since taking possession, Mr. Hegge has greatly improved the farm in general, has rebuilt the barn and house, and has put in an individual electric light plant, a complete water system, and modern plumbing conveniences. Carrying on general farming along scientific lines, he makes a specialty of raising thoroughbred and high-grade Holstein cattle for dairy purposes, and Duroc-Jersey swine for shipping. Before being elected town chairman in 1912, Mr. Hegge did good service for fifteen years as town clerk. He has been secretary and treasurer of the Pigeon Grain and Stock Company since its organization, and is a director in the People's State Bank of Whitehall, which he also assisted in starting. For several years he has been secretary of the Norwegian Lutheran Congregation of Pigeon Falls.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 639

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Nels F. Hegge was for many years one of the substantial men of the county. He gave his name to an important valley in Pigeon Falls Township, was an earnest worker in town and school ofl!ice, and being a well-read man of kindly disposition, exerted a wide influence upon his fellowmen. He came of old Norwegian stock, and was born in Biri, Norway, Oct. 31, 1839. He was there reared amid rugged surroundings, and in 1866 determined to seek his fortunes amid the wider opportunities of America. Reaching La Crosse, he secured various employment, farming in the summer months, and working in Clark County in the lumbering season, both as a chopper in the forests and as engineer at the King's Mills. It was in the spring of 1871 that he came to Trempealeau County and located at the foot of the valley which has since borne his name. For thirty years he toiled early and late and built up his farm. In 1901, after a useful life filled with worthy endeavor, he retired and moved to Whitehall. His death, Aug. 25, 1912, was sincerely mourned. Starting with no other resources than a sturdy body and strong integrity, he had established his place as a man of worth and ability, he had achieved success, and given to the world a good family. His death will long be sincerely mourned. Mr. Hegge was married Sept. 20, 1869, to Nekoline E. Nelson, and this union was blessed with 10 children: Edward, of North Dakota; Oluf N.; Isaac, of North Dakota; Oscar, of Durant, Miss.; Sigvold, a banker of Whitehall; George, of Preston, Wash.; Even A., who resides on the home farm, and Frederick, Josephine and Anna, who are dead. Mrs. Hegge resides in Whitehall. Mr. Hegge was married March 26, 1902, to Clara Mortenson, who was born in Pipeon, Sept. 2-3, 1878, daughter of H. H. and Romang Mathea (Mathiason) Mortenson. This union has been blessed with a fine family of nine children: Norman Herbert, born Jan. 8, 1903; Myrtle Nettehe, March 17, 1904; Edgar Alfred, Nov. 15, 1906; Harold Erland, July 10, 1907; Ernest Victor, June 3, 1909; Orris William, April 9, 1911; Nels Frederick, Dec. 27, 1912; Anna Dorathy, Nov. 8, 1915; and Esther Andrea, born July 19, 1917.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 639 - 640

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Sigvald N. Hegge, cashier of the People's State Bank, of Whitehall, has had an important part in the upbuilding of that institution, and is one of the energetic young men of the village. A native of this county, and descended from a pioneer family, he had considerable experience in business before assuming the duties of his present position, and his well-merited success is built upon a firm foundation. He was born in Pigeon Township, May 18, 1887, the son of Nels F. and Lena (Nelson) Hegge, and there grew to manhood, receiving his early education in the district school of his neighborhood, and in the graded schools of Whitehall. In 1905 he graduated from the Wisconsin Business University at La Crosse, and soon thereafter became interested in the lumber business. Entering the employ of the St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator Co., he first took charge of their lumber yard at Hatton, N. D., and so thoroughly demonstrated his ability there, that he was employed for the next few years in opening and establishing yards at various points in western North Dakota and eastern Montana. Sept. 29, 1913, he returned to his native county to become assistant cashier of the People's State Bank, of Whitehall. Jan. 1, 1914, he was promoted to his present position. Fraternally Mr. Hegge is a former secretary of the local Masonic lodge, and past Noble Grand of the local Odd Fellows' lodge. He is also connected with other clubs and organizations. Mr. Hegge was married Dec. 29, 1915, to Emelia Bensen, of Whitehall, who was born in that village Aug. 13, 1888, daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth(Frederickson) Bensen, the former of whom is a mail carrier and the latter of whom died in 1911. Before her marriage, Mrs. Hegge was a teacher in the kindergarten department of the Whitehall public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Hegge have one child, Harriet Elizabeth, born Oct. 8, 1916. Nels F. Hegge, a pioneer, from whom is named Hegge Valley, in Pigeon Township, was born at Biri, Norway, came to America as a young man, lived in La Crosse for a while, came to Trempealeau County in 1872, lived in Pigeon Township until 1900, and then moved to Whitehall, where he died in 1912 at the age of 73 years. His widow, Lena Nelson, still makes her home in that village. She and her husband have been actively affiliated with the United Norwegian Lutheran church. Mr. Hegge was a strong Democrat in politics and had considerable influence in local affairs.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 517 - 518

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Andrew M. Hellekson. One of the best improved farms in Ettrick Township is that of Andrew M. Hellekson in section 21, a farm of 240 acres, with buildings and equipment indicating even to the casual eye the enterprise and thrift of its owner. Mr. Hellekson is a native of Wisconsin, having been born in the city of Racine, Aug. 21, 1870, son of Ellef and Christe (Nelson) Hellekson. His father was born in Kragero, Norway, Sept. 21, 1832, his mother being a native of the same place. The latter died when the subject of this sketch was 1 year old, and Ellef Hellekson subsequently married for his second wife Mrs. Johanna Halverson. From the age of 14 years he had followed the occupation of a sailor, before the Civil War on the ocean, during which period he visited most of the maritime countries of the world. He was still a young man when he came to the United States, and here he remained, for some time sailing the Great Lakes. The great city of Chicago, which he visited, attracted him and he made it his home, residing there until about 1887, in which year he made a sudden change in his occupation and manner of life, coming to Trempealeau County, Wis., and settling on the farm now owned by his son Andrew M. On a part of this farm he and his wife are still living, after spending many years in the cultivation of the soil, though now retired.

Andrew M. Hellekson was the youngest of four children. His boyhood was largely spent in the city of Chicago, where he attended the Maplewood school. At the age of 14 years he began industrial fife in Chicago, first as a door boy in a furniture store, from which position he was advanced to that of collector for the same firm. He remained with the concern until 1887, in which year he came to Trempealeau County with his father, with whom he remained practically all of the time, except for three winters, when he again worked in Chicago. While at home he was practically the manager of the farm from the time he came here, and is now its owner. It consists of 240 acres, 60 acres of which he has cleared. He gives particular attention to raising seeds of barley, rye, corn and oats from selected plants for market purposes and for a number of years he has been engaged successfully in breeding Guernsey cattle, milking 20 cows. Aside from the immediate profits of his farm, he is a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery, the Bank of Ettrick, the Ettrick & Northern Railroad, the Farmers' Elevator in Blair, of which he was a former director, the La Crosse Packing Company, the Ettrick Lumber Company and the Farmers' Telephone Company, of which he is president. In 1916 Mr. Hellekson built a fine modern residence, both commodious and attractive in appearance and provided with practically all modern facilities and conveniences, and most of the important improvements on the farm, including the neat and substantial buildings, have been put up by him. He has served as county secretary of the American Society of Equity, and was one of the organizers of the society in this county, and is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. In politics independent, he has performed some pubhc service, including two years as supervisor and three years as clerk of the school board. June 27, 1893, Mr. Hellekson was united in marriage with Sena Herreid, daughter of Gilbert and Ingeborg Herreid. He and his wife are the parents of six children: John Andrew, who is official tester at the State Agricultural College at Madison; Ida Josephine, residing at home; Ella Gertrude, who is attending the La Crosse School of Agriculture, at Onalaska; Charles Edgar, Emma Sophia and Lawrence Goodwin, residing at home. Mr. Hellekson and his family are members of Beaver Creek United Lutheran church. Through his own enterprise and industry, coupled with good judgment, he has achieved prosperity and attained an honorable place in the community as one of its substantial and reliable citizens. His children are receiving the advantage of a good education to qualify them to make their own way in life and all promise to be a credit to the family name.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 416 - 417

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Ole O. Helstad, a prosperous farmer of Ettrick Township, whose farm of 160 acres is located in section 11, was born in Norway. Jan. 15, 1856, son of Ole Larson and Bertha Simonson. There were 12 children in his parents' family: Christ, Martha, Sam, Lars, Mat, Sena, Bernt and Ole O. growing to maturity and the others dying young. All the members of the family who survived came to the United States, but not all together. Sam was the first to emigrate, and was followed by the parents. Then Bernt and Sena came, and after them Ole O.; then Martha and Mat and lastly Lars. The parents arrived in 1872, locating in Ettrick Township, Trempealeau County, on the farm now operated by their son Ole, and which contained 160 acres. The land had previously been pre-empted by Ole Halvorson, who had built a small log house on it, but as there was no barn Ole Larson built one of straw. He had little but his hands with which to begin work, and it was two years before he was able to obtain an ox team. Such merchandise as he needed he had to carry on his back from Galesville. The market was at Trempealeau and there was no road, the journey to Trempealeau with the ox team occupying two days. He had to use the jumper for a wagon, as he then had no wheeled vehicle. He succeeded, however, in getting a cow the first year. The rest of Mr. Larson's life was spent on this place, and he died in the old log cabin at the age of 84 years, his wife passing away at the same age. In early days their home was often the scene of religious meetings, the Lutheran congregation, then small, holding their services there. Later Mr. Helstad helped to build the church at French Creek, of which he was a member until his death.

Ole O. Helstad, the direct subject of this sketch, was 18 years old when he came to the United States. For a number of years he assisted his father in clearing and improving the homestead, and finally, in 1881, bought the farm and cared for his parents until their death. The present frame residence was erected by him, also the basement barn, 34 by 64 feet in size, and other buildings. He is engaged in general farming and raises good stock, and his operations have resulted profitably. Like his father, he assisted in building the Lutheran Church, of which he has been a trustee for many years. He also served on the school board nine years as clerk. Mr. Helstad married Kittie Jorgenson, who was born in Norway and accompanied her parents to America at the age of two years. He and his wife have had 12 children: Bernt, who died at the age of 26 years; Nick; Odell, who married Gena Olson and resides on the home farm; Albert; Olof, who married Siverna Redsten of Preston Township; Eiml; John; William; Carl; Gena, who married Christ Redsten of Ettrick Township; Clara, wife of Anton Nelsestuen of Ettrick Township; and Anna, who is the wife of L. O. Belland of Los Angeles, Calif.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 374 - 375

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Edward J. Henry, proprietor of the Oakgrove Stock Farm, sections 21 and 22, Sumner Township, was born on the place where he still lives Nov. 29, 1863, son of William and Elizabeth (Skillin) Henry. He has made many improvements on the farm, has fenced it with woven wire, and maintains his substantial home, barns and silo in the best of condition. He completed in 1917 a barn 36 by 60 feet, with cement floor and steel stanchions, for stock. Carrying on general farming in all its branches, he has made a specialty of Duroc-Jersey swine, of which he has a good drove. In public life he has served as supervisor for two years, and as clerk of the school board of his district since 1900. Mr. Henry was married June 1, 1886, to Ettie L. Johnson, born in Black Earth, Wis., Aug. 18, 1865, daughter of Almond S. and Jane (Oswald) Johnson, and this union has been blessed with six children: Vina, William D., Jane E., Nina L., Frank S. and Laura L. Vina was born June 1, 1888,. and married Ludwig Johnson, who farms in Eau Claire County. William D., born March 21, 1892, farms in Forsythe Mont. Jane E., born Dec. 12, 1893, graduated from the Augusta high school, and has successfully taught school in the same district for four years. Nina L. was born April 23, 1897, and is a graduate of the Augusta high school. Frank S. was born Sept. 23, 1902. Laura L. was born Oct. 10, 1905, both living at home.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 611

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William Henry came to Trempealeau County in 1858 and homesteaded a farm of 160 acres in sections 21 and 22, Sumner Township, where he lived until his death, May 28, 1913. He was born in County Down, near Belfast, Ireland, Jan. 27, 1828, the son of David Henry, who was born in Scotland, and for many years was an inn keeper in Ireland. William Henry came to America in 1852, and located in Chenango County, New York, where he lived until coming to Trempealeau County. In 1859 he went back to New York for a short trip and was there married to Elizabeth Skillin, a native of Chenango County. They had two sons, Elmer H., who farms in Eau Claire County, four miles north of Osseo, and Edward J., who bought the home farm about 1898.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 611

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August F. Hensel, one of the hardy pioneers of Arcadia Township, now passed away, was born in Prussia, Germany, Oct. 17, 1834.  His father, John F. Hensel, was born in Prussia in 1803, his mother being born in that country in 1801.  In 1839 they came to America with their family of five children, sailing from Hamburg in the spring and landing in New York after a tedious voyage of three months in a slow sailing vessel.  From New York they went direct to Buffalo, where they remained two years, John F. Hensel finding employment on the Erie canal.  In 1841, when the subject of this sketch was seven years old, they migrated to Milwaukee Township, Wisconsin, which place was their home until about 1847, in which year they came to Granville Township, where the father had secured a piece of land, and this, with the help of his sons, he improved.  In 1861 the family returned to Milwaukee, where John F. Hensel engaged in the house moving business.  That city remained his home for the rest of his life and he died there May 29, 1886, at the advanced age of 83 years.  His wife, whose maiden name is not now remembered, died in Milwaukee in February, 1881, at the age of 80.  There were seven children in their family:  Caroline, Edward, Julius, Matilda, August F., John A. and Charles A.  John Alfred was born on the voyage to America and was named after the ship on wich he was born.  Charles Albert, the youngest son, was born in Milwaukee in 1847.  August F. Hensel, while a youth living in Milwaukee, began industrial life as clerk in a store, and was thus occupied until May 5, 1854, at which time he removed to Madison, Wis., and continued as a resident of that county until he came to this part of the state.  While on a visit to his parents in Milwaukee he learned something about the natural resources of Buffalo County, and by the advice of his father decided to locate there.  His father gave him $300 with which to purchase land, and with his brother Julius he at once set out for Buffalo County.  The journey was made by way of Chicago, thence by rail to Dunleith (now East Dubuque) and from there by steamboat to La Crosse.  At the latter place he secured the services of a surveyor and proceeded to Buffalo County, where he made locations.  Subsequently he returned to the same county with a wagon and a pair of ponies, then, selling his outfit, went back to Milwaukee, but in the same fall returned to Buffalo County with an ox team and wagon.  He was accompanied by his brother, John A., and by Thomas Simpson, William Johnson and two Piper brothers.  The Piper brothers, however, left the party at Sparta.  All the members of the Buffalo County company were unmarried, and all except John A. Hensel located on land in the county.  This trip was made about 1856.  The winter of 1856-57 was severe and the pioneers suffered many hardships.  Their provisions became exhausted, and the situation became so serious that it was necessary to make a heroic effort to reach Fountain City.  Accordingly August F. Hensel started with a sled and three yoke of oxen, accompanied by Henry Wertenberg and James Faulds.  The snow was covered with a heavy crust, which was hard to break, this crust continuing for the entire distance of 16 miles.  It was so hard that although Mr. Hensel wore three pairs of pants they were all cut through in pieces before the party reached Fountain City, which they only did after a terrible journey of six days, having left home on Monday and reaching town on the following Saturday.  Their experiences may be more easily imagined than described.  Mr. Hensel had to borrow clothes to wear on the return trip.  Even after all this trouble and hardship they only succeeded in procuring one barrel of flour, which cost them $16.  Mr. Hensel nearly lost his life on the trip and all the party were much exhausted, succeeding only by force of will and power of endurance.  It is well for the young people of the present generation, who are surrounded by all the conveniences of a high civilization - good roads, steam and electric railroads and automobiles, with convenient stores of all kinds within a mile or two of their homes - to read and ponder on such narratives as these, more especially when they are inclined to be discontented with their lot.  They may then realize how much they have to be thankful for.  In 1862 August F. Hensel sold out his holdings in Buffalo County and moved to Trempealeau County, settling on land which he had purchased in Arcadia Township.  Here he lived until 1874, when, the village of Arcadia having been founded, he moved into it and erected a store, beginning mercantile business in 1876.  At this time he had been married 16 years and had a family, and here he passed the rest of his life, dying in Arcadia, July 2, 1902.  He was a Republican in politics and cast his first presidential vote for John C. Fremont in 1856, subsequently voting for every Republican President up to the time of his death.  His wife died in Arcadia Dec. 17, 1908.  Her maiden name was Amelia Hensel.  She was a native of Prussia and daughter of Ludwig Hensel, and their marriage took place in August 1860.  They had a large family of children, as follows:  Ida, born Aug. 26, 1861, now Mrs. C. Studt of Arcadia; Emma, born March 30, 1863, who died in July, 1890; Alvah, born Aug. 10, 1865, who resides in Minneapolis; Ayris, born June 30, 1867, now Mrs. George A. Schneller of Arcadia; Eunice, born Dec. 19, 1869, wife of William Koenig of Waupaca, Wis.; Almira, born in 1871, who died when six months old; Dexter, born in 1873, who died in 1874; Jesse, born Dec. 20, 1875, who is now living at Green Bay, Wis.; Ivan I., born March 4, 1878, who is now practicing dentistry in Arcadia Village; Myrtle,born March 25, 1886, who is unmarried and lives in Arcadia, and another child, who died in infancy.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 681 - 683

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Augustus W. Hensel, a retired farmer now living in Arcadia Village, was born in Germany, Nov. 7, 1840, son of Ludwig and Frederica (Kiekhoefer) Hensel.  The father was born in 1809 and the mother in 1812.  In 1856 the family came to the United States, locating in Milwaukee, Wis., where they remained until the spring of 1857.  They then came to Arcadia Township, Trempealeau County, where Ludwig Hensel pre-empted 160 acres of land in section 23, range 10 west.  The land, of course, was "wild," and their residence was a dugout.  Mr. Hensel gradually improved the property and resided on it subsequently until his death in 1886.  His wife survived him about nine years, dying on the homestead in 1894.  There were five children in their family - two sons and three daughters.  Augustus W. Hensel was the second born child of his parents.  He was educated in the common and district schools up to the age of 14 years, and remained on his father's farm until 1864.  He then became a soldier, serving in the Union army until the close of the war and taking part in the battle of Nashville.  Being mustered out at Washington, D. C., he returned home unwounded and became a pioneer farmer, buying 160 acres of wild land on section 14, range 10, Arcadia Township.  This land he developed and erected on it substantial buildings, residing there until 1906, in which year he retired and took uphis residence in the village.  The old home he sold in 1908 to his son Lewis, who lives on the farm.  Nov. 28, 1867, Mr. Hensel married Mary, daughter of William and Sophia (Supka) Wagner of Arcadia, who is sharing with her husband the comfortable prosperity of their declining years.  The following are the children who have been born to them:  Lewis, born Aug. 7, 1868, who is now living on the old homestead, of which he is the owner; William, born Dec. 12, 1869, who is a farmer at Black River Falls, Wis.; Erwin, born March 12, 1871, who is a merchant at Grand Meadow, Minn.; Lillian, born Jan. 11, 1873, and now Mrs. J. W. Kube of Winona, Minn.; Frank, born Jan. 14, 1875, who is a farmer at Burlington, N. D.; Edith, born Oct. 19, 1877, now the wife of A. L. Severence, a banker of Wausaukee, Wis.; John, born Oct. 10, 1879, who is now a railway ticket agent at Eau Claire, Wis.; Helena, born Sept. 19, 1881, who is unmarried, resides at home and is employed as a bank clerk; Edward, born Aug. 17, 1883, who is a farmer at Strasburg, Colo.; Emma, born March 15, 1888, who is now Mrs. Lester Kindsehy of Strasburg, Colo.  Mr. Hensel is a Republican, but is not active in politics.  He has, however, served as a member of the school board of district No. 2, Arcadia Township.  He and his family are members of the German Evangelical Association, and all are widely respected in the communities in which they live.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 683 - 684

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Earl F. Hensel, attorney, journalist and public speaker, former county judge and former county attorney, has been prominent in political and public affairs in Trempealeau County for many years, and being still a young man, his friends predict for him a still more brilliant future.  He is a native of this State, having first seen the light of day in Glencoe Township, Buffalo County, Feb. 2, 1875, son of Julius and Sarah E. (Simpson) Hensel, who brought him to Arcadia, in this county, as an infant.  As a youth he passed through the public schools of Arcadia, and was graduated from the high school there with the class of 1892.  With this preparation, he became a teacher for seven terms, three in Buffalo County, one in Trempealeau County, and three in Lamoure County, N. D.  In 1897 he entered the law department of the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and was graduated therefrom with the class of 1900, receiving the degree of LL. B.  At Blair he hung out his shingle, and there began his professional career.  While at Blair he was for a while one of the editors of the Blair Press.  His practice soon assumed proportions of importance, his legal ability commanded attention, and when the death of Robert Christianson in July, 1904, left a vacancy in the office of district attorney, he was appointed to the position and moved his family to the county seat.  So faithfully and ably did he serve that he was elected to the office that fall and re-elected in the fall of 1906, serving until the close of 1908.  In 1912 he was again elected, serving until the close of 1914.  In the meantime, July 3, 1909, he had been appointed county judge to serve out the term of Robert S. Cowie, giving universal satisfaction to the attorneys and to the people.  Since retiring from county office, Judge Hensel has devoted himself to the practice of his profession, as well as to journalism as local editor of the Whitehall Times-Banner.  In addition to the offices mentioned, Judge Hensel has been village attorney of Blair for four years, village attorney of Whitehall eight years, township attorney of several towns at various times, president of the village of Whitehall one term, and member of the county board one term.  His fraternal relations are with the A. F. & A. M. and the B. R. F. F.  Of commanding physique, compelling voice, brilliant oratory and broad kindliness, Judge Hensel is a man of marked personality, and it is natural that he should be a leader in local and county affairs.  His abilities as an orator are widely known, and in the dark days of the entrance of the United States into the Great War he has been of valuable service on the side of loyalty and patriotism.  Judge Hensel was married March 19, 1902, to Eunice G. Owen, daughter of Rev. T. Grafton Owen.  This union has been blessed with two children:  Alfred Harvey and Margaret C.  Alfred Harvey was born Dec. 31, 1902, endeared himself to all of those with whom he came in contact during his brief life, and died Dec. 24, 1916.  Margaret C. was born Dec. 20, 1909.  Mrs. Hensel is one of the leading women of the community.  She is prominent in all society and charitable work, was one of the founders of the Ladies Chautauqua Circle, has been very active in Red Cross work, and has been an important factor in the daily life of Whitehall for many years.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 775 - 776

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Ivan I. Hensel, D. D. S., who is engaged in the practice of dentistry in Arcadia Village, was born in Arcadia, Wis., March 4, 1878, son of August F. and Amelia Hensel.  He was educated in the village school and in Arcadia high school, from which he was graduated in 1896.  Having decided upon dentistry as his future profession, he entered Marquette Dental School, Milwaukee, and was graduated therefrom in 1900, beginnign his practice in Blair, Wis.  Soon after, however, he removed to Arcadia, his home town, and established himself in practice here, where he is now the leading dentist.  Aside from his profession he owns stock in the Western Wisconsin Telephone Company.  Sept. 24, 1902, Dr. Hensel was married to Nora, daughter of Jacob and Sarah Kindschy of Arcadia, and they have two children:  Marie, born Oct. 23, 1908, and Dwight, born Nov. 3, 1912.  Dr. Hensel owns a comfortable home on the west side of the village, and is recognized as one of Arcadia's stable citizens, the Hensels being one of the principal families in the town.  In politics the Doctor is independent and is not an incumbent of any public office.  Since 1904 he has been a member of the Masonic Blue Lodge, No. 201, and for several years has also belong to the lodges of Modern Woodmen of America and the Beavers, both of which he has served as secretary.  His religious affiliations are with the Evangelical church, in the faith of which he was reared.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 683

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Julius Hensel, a pioneer, was born in Prussia, Jan. 7, 1833, and was brought to this country by his parents at the age of 5 years.  His wife, Sarah E. Simpson, whom he married at Cross Plains, Dane County, Wis., was born in England, Dec. 25, 1835, and came to America at the age of 5 years.  In 1856 he came to Buffalo County, in this State, and two years later brought his wife here, overland by ox-team.  Together they started to carve their fortunes in the wilderness.  So well and faithfully did they labor that their original tract of 160 acres had in 1861 been increased to a whole section of land.  Loyal to his adopted country, he listened to the call of duty in 1862 and enlisted in Company F, Twenty-fifth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.  After doing valiant service for about a year he was wounded at the battle of Atlanta and as a result was confined in the Alfred Harvey Hospital, where, after his partial recovery, he was retained as an assistant for a while before his honorable discharge.  Upon his release he returned to his farm, where he successfully carried on farming operations until the summer of 1876, when he retired and moved to Arcadia, where he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives.  They were the parents of 11 children:  Phalana, of Whitehall; Frederic W., of Hay Creek, Ore.; Frank (deceased); Alfred Harvey (deceased); Hiram E., of Arcadia; Leroy (deceased); Ruth E., the wife of Robert Pedder, of Arcadia; Charles, of Sheyenne, N. D.; Earl F., of Whitehall; Herman T. (deceased), and Fannie J. (deceased).

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 774

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Walter Hermann, a well known farmer in sections 27 and 28, Gale Township, was born in La Crosse County, Wis., July 8, 1884, son of Jacob and Augusta (Yootic) Hermann. The parents were natives of Germany, who came to the United States when children, the family of Jacob Hermann settling at Smith's Cooley in La Crosse County. Wis., where he later engaged in farming. He continued there until 1908, when he retired and took up his residence in the city of La Crosse. He and his wife celebrated their golden wedding there in the fall of 1915. Of their family of nine children their son Walter was the youngest. Walter Hermann when a boy attended district school in Smith's Cooley, La Crosse County. He assisted his father until his marriage, and then located on his present farm in Gale Township, which consists of 160 acres of highly cultivated land. Here he is engaged in general farming and dairying, also in raising pure-bred Guernsey cattle, his other live stock including hogs and horses. He is also a stockholder in a threshing outfit owned in the vicinity. Mr. Hermann was married, March 24, 1909, to Minnie Beyer, who was born in Smith Cooley, La Crosse County, July 7, 1883, daughter of August and Minnie (Hoffman) Beyer. Her parents were natives of Germany. Mr. Beyer came to the United States at the age of 7 years and mother came at age of 14. They are now retired from farming labor, but still reside on the farm. They had a family of 12 children, their daughter Minnie being the third in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Hermann have one child, Alice Dorothy, a bright girl, born Feb. 3, 1914. The family are members of the Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Hermann is independent. He has never sought office, but has always taken an interest in good government and cast his vote accordingly. He has always, too, shown a willingness to support any practical movement for the general good of the community. He and his family are well known and respected in this part of the county.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 365 - 366

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Gilbert M. Herreid, a prosperous representative of the agricultural interests of Ettrick Township, was born on his present farm, and in the same house in which he now lives, in section 16 E, May 10, 1872. His parents were Gilbert Olson and Ingeborg Torgersdater Twinde Herreid, farming people near the village of Lodi, who came to America, and settled in Ettrick Township, this county, in 186.3. Gilbert M. had limited educational opportunities, but in his boyhood attended school for awhile in Ettrick Township. Under his father's instruction he acquired a good knowledge of agriculture and began working for his father by the year when he was 21 years old, becoming a partner in the farm when he was 25. Jan. 1, 1906, he purchased the entire farm, which now consists of 160 acres, he having recently sold 40 acres. He is engaged in the breeding of registered Shorthorn cattle and since 1902 has also been breeding Poland-China hogs. Aside from his immediate farming interests Mr. Herreid is a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery Company, the Co-operative Packing Company of La Crosse, the Farmers' Exchange at Blair, the Ettrick Telephone Company and the Ettrick & Northern Railroad Company.

Oct. 10, 1900, he was married to Ida Gilbertson, who was born at French Creek, Ettrick Township, daughter of Even O. and Maria Antoinetta Gilbertson. The parents, natives of Biri, Norway, came to Ettrick Township at an early date and engaged in farming. Mr. Gilbertson, who was a brother of J. O. Gilbertson, became a prominent citizen of the township, serving as chairman of the township board and a member of the county board and in other local offices. He was also president and secretary of the Scandinavian Insurance Company, a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery, and as manager of a stock company organized here, bought two fine Clydesdale stallions, the first of the kind brought to Ettrick Township. He also took a prominent part in church work. His death occurred Sept. 26, 1913. His wife, who survives him, is a resident of Centerville, Wisconsin.

Mr. and Mrs. Herreid are the parents of two children: Eugene Guy, born Aug. 18, 1902, who is attending the agricultural college at Onalaska, and Irene Marcella, born May 31, 1905, who is attending school. Mr. Herreid is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and of the United Lutheran Church, to which his family also belong. In politics he is a Republican, and while never ambitious to hold pubhc office, as a good citizen he has several times consented to serve, and was supervisor for three years and school clerk six years, after which he declined further service. A list of his parents' children, living and deceased, is as follows: Tosten G., born Oct. 31, 1857; Ole, born April 5, 1863 ; Thomas, born April 27, 1865, now residing near Galesville; Carl, born July 21, 1868, who died June 8, 1879; Sena R., wife of A. M. Hellekson, born May 31, 1870; Gilbert M., born May 10, 1872 ; Iver, born April 5, 1874, now a resident of Galesville; and Emma Marthina, born April 7, 1877, who died Jan. 15, 1879.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 367 - 368

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Gilbert Olson Herreid, a pioneer settler in Ettrick Township, now deceased, was born in Hardanger, Norway, June 23, 1836. He was married in his native land to Ingeborg Torgersdater Twinde, who was born in Vosse Naugen, Norway, March 20, 1832, Mr. Herreid being then engaged in operating a rented farm in that county, near the village of Lodi. In 1863 he and his family started for Trempealeau County, arriving here with one of the first teams ever seen in the county, hitched to a home-made wagon. They settled on the farm now owned by their son Gilbert M., and on which the original log house is still standing. Mr. Herreid at once began clearing the land and was thus engaged when, in 1865, he was drafted to serve in the Civil War. He had only proceeded as far as Madison, however, when the war came to an end and he was allowed to return home. When he first arrived here he had but $6 in money and was destitute of provisions or supplies, but having an old army musket he made use of it to shoot prairie chickens and other game, on which he and his family chiefly lived for awhile. About a year after his arrival he bought a cow from his brother, but the animal was stolen before he had had a chance to milk it, the thief at the same time taking the halter of one of his horses and putting it on the cow to lead it away with. The cow was never recovered, nor ever afterwards heard of. At that time there were plenty of Indians in this vicinity, and they often came to the cabin begging, but were not unfriendly. Mr. Herreid worked hard and in course of time began to prosper. He increased the size of his farm until he had 360 acres of land in it, and from time to time made improvements in his buildings. That he was an enterprising man may be gathered from the fact that he bought the first steam engine used on any farm on Beaver Creek, with which he did work for others for a number of years. He also kept his eyes open for other opportunities, was a stockholder in the Hegg store, helped to organize the first creamery at Blair and also the Ettrick creamery. He owned stock in the first Norman horse ever brought to Ettrick Township, and assisted in organizing the Farmers' store in Blair, keeping up his varied activities until a year before his death, which took place Jan. 29, 1914, when he was in his seventy-eighth year. Although so active in business matters Mr. Herreid would never accept office of any kind. His wife assisted him not only in the household, but also practicing as a midwife throughout all this part of the county, and was so efficient in this profession that she was frequently called to render service not only in Galesville, Whitehall, Centerville, Blair, and other places in this county, but also sometimes in La Crosse. She is still living and makes her home with her son, Gilbert M. Herreid.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 366 - 367

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Ole G. Herreid, who is engaged in operating a valuable farm of 155 acres in section 16 E., Ettrick Township, was born in Dane County, Wisconsin, near Lodi, April 5, 1863, son of Gilbert Olson and Ingeborg (Torgersdater) Herreid. A memoir of his parents may be found in the sketch of his brother, Gilbert M. Herreid. Mr. Herreid acquired his education in the local schools, his parents having settled in Trempealeau County in the year of his birth, and was brought up on the home farm. At the age of 18 years he began working in the woods in the winter time, but continued to make his home with his parents until he was 27, at which time he purchased his present farm from his father. Besides carrying on general agricultural operations on his own farm, he has operated a threshing outfit for the last 37 years. Since taking possession of his present homestead, he has made many improvements on it, his barn being a substantial structure, 32 by 70 feet, with 16-foot stockboards and cement floors, equipped in modern style. Mr. Herreid is a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery Company and also operates a cream route, which takes two or three days of his time each week. Since he began farming on his own account he has made steady progress and is now one of the prosperous citizens of his township. He has served on the school board for nine years and in politics is independent. Oct. 9, 1891, Mr. Herreid was united in marriage with Mattie Paine, who was born at Medalia, Minn., daughter of William G. and Julia (Dale) Paine. Her father was born in Wrentham, Mass., of Scotch-Irish stock, and in early life was a sailor, going to sea on his uncle's whaling vessel at the age of 14 years. After five years spent in this adventurous employment, the Civil War having broken out, he enlisted in the Eighth Rhode Island Artillery and served three years. On the conclusion of his term of service he engaged in the hotel business at St. Cloud, Minn., having come west with a military company under the command of General Sibley, which company disbanded at St. Cloud. Later he engaged in business at Madelia, Minn., where after a residence of seven years, he died. His wife, who was born in Norway, is now residing with her daughter in Ettrick Township. By her marriage with Mr. Paine she had three children, and after his death she became the wife of Ed Johnson, who subsequently died in this township. Of this latter union two children were born. Mr. and Mrs. Herreid have 10 children: Emma, Willa, Gordon, Carl, Lea, Rachel, Blanche and Bernice (twins), Grace and Richard. Mr. Herreid belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, and he and his family are members of the United Lutheran Church.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 559

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Peter T. Herreid, a prosperous hardware merchant, of Blair, Wis., was born in Ettrick Township, Trempealeau County, Wis., Oct. 13, 1867. His parents were Thomas O. and Brita (Bue) Herreid. The father was born at Hardanger, Norway, and came to America in 1854, locating in Dane County, Wis., where he remained until 1858. He then came to Trempealeau County and homesteaded a farm in Ettrick Township, which place was his home for the rest of his life. He died March 20, 1898, when 69 years old. His wife died Aug. 14, 1914, at the age of 87. Peter T. Herreid at 16 years of age began work as a carpenter in Pigeon Township and was thus occupied until 1893. In 1895 he bought the hardware store of A. B. Peterson, at Blair, being associated with his brother Thomas, under the firm name of Herreid Brothers. The firm has since continued in business and has built up a good trade. Their building is a one-story frame 24x100 feet. They carry a general line of hardware, operate a tinshop and conduct heating and plumbing departments of their business. Peter T. Herreid has been a member of the village council five years, having served as its president for two years. He has also served on the school board ten years. He is a stockholder in the First National Bank of Blair. His religious afliliations are with the United Norwegian Lutheran church, which he has served as treasurer since about 1900. He also had charge of the building of the church. December 27, 1895, Mr. Herreid was united in marriage with Hanna B. Hanson, of Blair, whose father, Martin Hanson Skyrud, was a pioneer farmer of Trempealeau County. To him and his wife five children have been born: Myron, Berdelle, Leon, Francis and Lyla. Myron is on the flagship Pennsylvania in the navy; Berdelle is a proficient teacher; Leon is with the L. C. Hyde & Britton Bankers, at Beloit, Wis.; Francis and Lyla are at home.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 389

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Thomas P. Herreid, a farmer of section 14, E. Ettrick Township, is a native of this township, having been born near Hegg, Nov. 26, 1886. His parents, Peter O. and Segried (Larsdatter) Herreid, were both born in Hardanger, Norway, and were married in that country, coming to America while still a young couple. After arriving in Trempealeau County, Wis., they resided with Peter Herreid's brother, K. O., for one year. Peter then bought land in Ettrick Township and began farming, in which occupation he continued for the rest of his life, his death taking place in December, 1911. He had learned the trade of stone mason in his younger days and followed it here at times when work was slack on the farm. He was a member of the United Lutheran Church. His wife, who survived him, still resides on the old farm. They were the parents of eight children, of whom Thomas P. was the seventh in order of birth.

Thomas P. Herreid was educated in the district school at Hegg. At the age of 16 years he began working out on farms, and continued to work for others, besides assisting his father, until two years before he married. He then settled on the farm which he and his wife now own and which contains 180 acres of land. Mr. Herreid has added to the improvements and the property is now well supplied with suitable buildings and a good equipment of machinery and implements. It is registered as Meadow Brook Farm and is a good piece of agricultural property. Sept. 10, 1911, Mr. Herreid was married to Ella Amelia Augeness, who was born in Ettrick Township, where she now lives. Her parents were Peter J. and Martha S. (Nelson) Augeness, the former born in Hardanger, Norway, Feb. 28, 1864. Mr. Augeness came to this country two or three years before he was married, locating in Trempealeau County, Wis., and working at first for others. After his marriage he lived on the farm of his wife's father until his early death at the age of 27 years. His wife subsequently continued to reside with her parents until her own death, June 16, 1900. One year previous to that event the family moved from the farm to Ettrick, where the mother died. Mrs. Herreid was the first born of two children, and the only one now living. In her girlhood she attended the district school at Hegg, where her husband was a fellow pupil and a member of the same class, and subsequently her education was continued in the school in Ettrick Village and at Gale College, which latter institution she attended a part of a term only, being obliged to give up her studies on account of the illness of her grandmother. Simon Nelson, her grandfather, was one of the first settlers in Trempealeau County. She was reared in the faith of the Lutheran Synod Church. Mr. and Mrs. Herreid are the parents of one child, Stanley Mirald Palmer, who was born April 29, 1913. The family are members of the Lutheran Synod Church. Mr. Herreid is a Republican in politics, but takes no active part in township affairs, devoting his whole attention to the farm. He is a prosperous citizen and he and his family are well known and respected in this part of Trempealeau County.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 368 - 369

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Tosten G. Herreid, who owns and operates Pleasant View Farm of 200 acres in section 17, Ettrick Township, was born in Dane County., Wis., near Stoughton, Oct. 31, 1857, son of Gilbert and Ingaborg Torgersdatter (Twinde) Herreid. His parents were natives of Norway, the father born at Hardanger, Bergenstift, June 23, 1836, and the mother at Vosse Nangen, March 20, 1832. Gilbert Herreid came to the United States in the spring of 1857, locating in Dane County, Wis., where he engaged in farming, and in 1863 came to Trempealeau County, locating in Ettrick Township, where he homesteaded land and improved and developed it into a good farm. There his death took place in December, 1914. His wife is still residing on the homestead. Their family numbered nine children, of whom Tosten G. was the oldest. Tosten G. Herreid acquired his education in the local schools of Ettrick Township. He resided at home until he was 25 years old and then bought land in Ettrick Township, farming that place for 13 years. He then sold it and purchased his present farm, which consists of 200 acres of valuable land and which he is operating in a general way, raising various crops and breeding Hereford cattle from pure-bred sires. He has greatly improved the property, having erected modern barns and other necessary buildings, and is doing a successful business. Feb. 19, 1880, Mr. Herreid was united in marriage with Ragnhild Bue, who was born in Hardanger, Norway, daughter of To.sten and Anna (Kjarland) Bue, her parents being natives of the same place. Tosten Bue was born March 6, 1820, and his wife in 1824. They came to the United States in 1866, and within one week after landing in this country the wife died. Mr. Bue continued west to Winnesheik County, Iowa, where he remained some years, or until 1873, when he came to Ettrick Township, Trempealeau County, Wis., and homesteaded land on which he resided until his death in 1886. He and his wife had a family of nine children.

Mr. and Mrs. Herreid have been the parents of seven children: Gilbert Theodore, unmarried and now living in one of the more Western States; Anna Emelia, wife of John Instenes, a farmer of Ettrick Township; Carl Alfred (the second born), who died in infancy; Clara Martena, wife of Louis Instenes, a farmer residing at Hegg, this township; Andrew Julius, residing at home ; Selmer Imanuel, who died in childhood, and Selma Regina, who graduated at the Galesville High School and is now a teacher in Trempealeau County. The family are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 417 - 418

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Albert Hess, postmaster, and editor of the Arcadia Leader, is a native of this State, having been born in Buffalo County, Montana Township, Sept. 24, 1871, son of George and Fredericka (Beutner) Hess. George Hess was born in Germany, came to America in 1850, lived at Cleveland, Ohio, five years, employed as a carpenter, came to Winona, Minn., in 1855, and located in Buffalo County in 1860, there remaining until his death in 1895 at the age of 70 years. He married in 1852 Fredericka Beutner, who was born in Germany in 1830, came to America in 1851, and now lives in Buffalo County at the age of 87 years. Three of the children in the family are living. Albert Hess attended the public schools of his neighborhood, supplemented with courses in the high schools at Arcadia and Alma. He was reared to farm pursuits, and remained on the home farm until 1896. Then he was employed in the machine business at Arcadia, six years. In 1902 he entered the postal service as mail carrier on Route No. 1, out of Arcadia. The Leader being for sale in 1904, he purchased it, and has since been its editor and proprietor. Sept. 1, 1913, he was appointed postmaster by President Woodrow Wilson. Previous to this for three years he had been secretary of the Democratic County Committee. Mr. Hess was married Jan. 1, 1896, to Clara Nickel, daughter of Fred and Elizabeth (Fenstermacher) Nickel, the former of whom is pastor of the Evangelical Association church at Port Washington, Wis. Mr. and Mrs. Hess have one daughter, Ethel, born May 11, 1899, who assisted her father in the postofflce, but now is a student at the State University at Madison, Wis.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 676

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Charles F. Hewitt, proprietor of a good farm of 200 acres, 140 acres of which lie in Gale Township, and the balance in Ettrick, his residence being in section 2, Gale township, was born at Nelson, near Alma, Buffalo County, Wis., Feb. 4, 1875, son of John Charles and Margaret (Stilts) Hewitt. Charles F. Hewitt was the third eldest in a family of six children. In his youth he attended district school in La Crosse County, and afterward the Wisconsin Business University at La Crosse. He accompanied his parents to the farm in Gale and Ettrick Townships and has resided on it ever since. In 1901 he took charge of the property and has continued to operate it up to the present time, with the exception of three years, during which time he had it let out to a renter. The land is valuable and produces good crops, and Mr. Hewitt has added from time to time to the improvements, until it now has all necessary buildings. He is also a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery Company and the Ettrick & Northern Railway Company. Mr. Hewitt was married, April 5, 1899, to Jerusha Casey, who was born in Ettrick Township, daughter of Maurice and Helen (Daily) Casey. His fraternal affiliations are with the Blue Lodge of Masons and the Modern Woodmen of America, Mrs. Hewitt belonging to the Royal Neighbors. He is now State oil inspector.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 411

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John Charles Hewitt, pioneer lumberman, successful agriculturist, and gallant soldier, was born in Canada, Aug. 19, 1832. Early in life Mr. Hewitt became a lumberman and riverman. He was still a young man when he came to the United States and was in this country when the Civil War broke out. In that great struggle he took an active part, enlisting at La Crosse in the First Wisconsin Light Artillery, with which organization he served three years and escaped unwounded. At the close of the war he returned to La Crosse County and again took up river work as foreman for the Black River Improvement Company, soon moving from La Crosse to Bloomer, Wis., where he lived for two years. He then moved to Beef Slough, near Nelson, in Buffalo County, as foreman for the Mississippi Logging Company, remaining there about five years, and subsequently returned to La Crosse County, where he purchased a farm. Not long afterward he again entered the employ of the Black River Improvement Company, working on Black River. After spending three years at this familiar work the farm again claimed his attention and he returned to it and followed agriculture until 1890, when he quit that occupation and moved to La Crosse, where he lived retired for about two years. He then came to Gale Township and purchased the farms on which his sons Charles F. and Mark R. now reside, and resumed agricultural operations, being thus actively engaged until 1899, when he retired and moved to Galesville, where he died Dec. 12, 1912. Mr. Hewitt was married Sept. 2, 1867, at Minnesota City, to Margaret Jane Stiltz Rooh. Margaret Jane Stiltz was born near Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio, Jan. 22, 1841, and was brought by her parents to Juneau County, in this State, in 1855. Four years later she married Jacob Rooh, who died in 1865, leaving two children, of whom Fred Rooh, of La Crosse, still survives. Mrs. Hewitt died July 7, 1917. Mr. and Mrs. Hewitt are survived by six children: Charles F., Harry B., Mark R., Frank B., Lottie and Emma. Charles F. is the State oil inspector.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 714

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Mark R. Hewitt, who is engaged in farming and stock raising in section 2, Gale Township, is a man who has had an active and interesting career. He was born at Midway, La Crosse County, June 14, 1879, son of John Charles and Margaret (Stilts) Hewitt. Mark R. was educated in schools at Midway and La Crosse, Wis. At the age of 17 years he began working in a saw mill and lumbering in the woods. In 1898, when he was still under age, the Spanish-American war broke out, and he enlisted, though without his parents' consent, in Company C, Twelfth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, at Winona, Minn., and was stationed at New Ulm and St. Paul about five weeks, going later to Georgia and Tennessee. His service lasted six months and he was then mustered out at New Ulm. During the following winter he worked on the farm, and was then engaged in rafting on the river for about three months, with headquarters at La Crosse. After this he spent some time in harvesting and threshing in North Dakota, the next winter working in the woods of northern Wisconsin. His next employment, during the summer, was log driving on the upper Chippewa River; then lumbering again in the winter at Mountain Iron, 100 miles north of Duluth. Mr. Hewitt then changed the scene of his activities to the Hood River, Oregon, where he spent some time lumbering in the woods at the foot of Mt. Hood. About July 4, 1903, he returned to Trempealeau County, but left soon for North Dakota, where he worked in the harvest fields. In the fall of 1903 he and his brother Charles purchased the old home farm, the winter, however, being spent by him in the lumber woods. The cold weather over, he returned to the farm in Gale Township, where he has since remained, engaged for the most part in agricultural work, with the exception spent in carpentering and three summers in hauling freight between Galesville and Ettrick. He has 160 acres of land highly improved, with modern buildings and every necessary or desirable convenience. The size of his barn is 36 by 80 feet, with 24-foot posts, it too being equipped with all necessary apparatus. Aside from his general farming operations, Mr. Hewitt is engaged in raising pure-bred Chester-White hogs and is a members of the Chester-White Association. He also carries on dairying successfully, and is a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery and in the Ettrick & Northern Railway. In 1906 he homesteaded land in North Dakota, which he sold a year later. In that same year, in the month of March, he was married to Stella Casey, who was born in Ettrick, Trempealeau County, Wis., daughter of Morris and Helen (Daily) Casey. He and his wife have one child: Vivian E. They are both members of the Eastern Star lodge, Mr. Hewitt being also a member of the Blue Lodge of Masons at Galesville, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Spanish-War Veterans' Association. In politics he is an independent Republican, his religious affiliations being with the Presbyterian church. He has held some local offices, having served as constable two years and as road superintendent of Gale Township.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 410 - 411

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George N. Hidershide, M. D., dean of the medical profession in Trempealeau County, pioneer physician, retired army officer, useful citizen, and man-of-affairs, came to Arcadia in 1875, less than eighteen months after the railroad was opened, and his experiences were typical of that heroic band of medical practitioners who had so important a part in the development of the Northwest. The story of his career presents him as working out the destinies of pioneer life hand in hand with the other forces for the common good. He was an integral part of the pioneer social fabric. As such he shared the aims and ambitions of his companions. Only rough outlines can be given of the heroic and adventurous side of his long and honored life. The imagination cannot, unaided by facts, picture the primitive conditions with which he had to contend. Long and dreary rides by day and night, in summer's heat and winter's cold, through flood and drought, through snow and mud, through rain and hail, were his common lot. Often he went for a week without being out of his clothes, and sometimes he went days without sleep. He trusted himself to the wilderness, crossed unbridged streams, made his way over untrodden ridges, and traveled the roadless wilderness. What few roads there were, were in the worst of condition. Often he took routes which showed not a single trace of human travel. Some roads consisted merely of parallel wheel tracks, from which the rain had washed the earth, leaving ruts whose stones made travel a constant succession of jolts. The present generation cannot realize the difficulties of a physician's travels in those days. Oftentimes the traveler had to make a temporary bridge across the swollen streams with planks or logs or poles. Sometimes in a dangerous place the horses had to be unhitched and led for a distance and tied, and then the vehicle hauled over the same route by the driver. Sometimes the patient was in a cabin so inaccessible that the physician had to leave his horse in a sheltered nook and find his way to the cabin on foot. But Dr. Hidershide was not unaccustomed to pioneer life and conditions. He had settled in Mt. Vernon Township, in Winona County, when that township was a wilderness; he was not only in active sympathy with pioneer life, but was prepared by his own experiences to cope with its conditions. It was indeed particularly fortunate for the pioneers of Trempealeau County that a man of Dr. Hidershide's type was the one who should have cast his destinies in this county at the time he did. There was much sickness and much suffering. The people were poorly nourished and poorly housed. Sanitary conditions were of the worst. No quarantine restrictions were observed. Contagion was carried from family to family, and within the families there was no opportunity for isolation. To lay four or five contagion-stricken children in a single grave under the prairie sod was no uncommon experience. Physicians were few. The resources of the best physicians were limited. The doctors were without any of the modern equipment for fighting disease. The doctors at Black River Falls, Merrillan, Whitehall, Fountain City, Galesville, Trempealeau, Arcadia and Winona, who served this entire district, were greatly overworked. They were without our present means of physical diagnosis, without our laboratories and experiments, our medical journals, our chemistry, our bacteriology, our Roentgen rays, our experimental pharmacology and our antitoxin serums; abdominal surgery was considered almost an impossibility, the Dr. McDowell case in Kentucky being the only one on record at that time. Many diseases which now yield to treatment were considered fatal. But Dr. Hidershide had his eyes, his ears, his fingers, his native vigor and resourcefulness, his kindliness of heart, and his adaptability. He learned much for himself, he kept pace with modern discovery, he readily adjusted himself to changing conditions, he put his heart and sympathies into every case. Up to the time of his serious illness six years ago he never refused a call. He always responded to the poor and gave as freely to those who could not pay as to those who were able to recompense him. In the early days the only income of the farmers came from small grains, and this money did not come until late fall. Many a farmer had hardly a single dollar during the spring and summer months. Business was done on credit. Often without funds himself. Dr. Hidershide year after year worked through winter, spring and summer, waiting until fall for the meager pay for his faithful services, only to find even then that many of the patients were unable to pay, and that he would have to wait until another fall, or sometimes forever. The long and exhaustive rides, the exposure to contagions, the heartaches and discouragements, the patient vigils by bedsides of agony when his own body was exhausted by exposure and racked with pain of fatigue, the kindly deeds of charity, the reassuring messages to the despondent, the shielding of the innocent, the guarding of secrets, the numberless self abnegations of such a man cannot be chronicled. He became almost a member of the families to whom he ministered. He was the adviser in matters not always purely medical. How welcome was his coming in the stormy midnight to a lonely cabin miles from the nearest neighbor. Earnest, cheery, capable, confident, his presence lightened the burden, shouldered the responsibility and brightened the gloom. From the toils and exposures of his professional life the doctor has found surcease in his love of the beautiful in nature. Passionately fond of flowers, he has laid out his lawns in a profusion of shrubbery and plants, and his estate, situated on the slope of land which separates the flats from the table lands on the principal street in Arcadia, represents the loving care which he has devoted to its arrangement and perfection. George N. Hidershide was born in Luxembourg, June 13, 1850, son of Nicholas and Anna M. (Salenting) Hidershide. They were well established there, but willing to sacrifice the comforts of their position and the companionship of their friends that their family might escape from the shackles of militarism, they determined upon cutting loose from old traditions and establishing themselves in the new world. Accordingly in 1857, with their four children, Peter, now a retired farmer of Mt. Vernon Township, Winona County, Minn.; Mary Jane, now of Brown's Valley, Minnesota, widow of John Rodenbour; George N., the subject of this sketch; and Mary A., now the wife of Henry D. Stevens of Winona; (Louisa, who like her husband, Joseph Meyers, is now deceased, having been born later in this country), they set sail, and reaching Minneiska, Minn., in July of that year, they settled on a farm in Mt. Vernon Township, Winona County, in that state. There the father died, and in later years the mother moved to Arcadia, where she was given loving care and attention by her devoted son, the subject of this sketch. George N. grew to sturdy young manhood on the Mt. Vernon farm, attending the district schools, and rounding out his preparatory education with a course in the Winona State Normal School. In the meantime he had spent a year learning English in the home of Dr. George F. Childs, in Minneiska, and this had inspired him to adopt medicine as a profession. In due time he entered the Louisville Medical College at Louisville, Ky., and was graduated therefrom in 1875. This education he has supplemented by extensive reading and study, and by post-graduate courses in the Rush Medical College at Chicago, the Vienna University at Vienna, Austria, and in other institutions, so although the whole tenor of medical practice has changed since his entering the profession, he has nevertheless kept fully abreast of the latest discoveries and the most modern methods. After a short practice in Chicago he was called home by the death of his father, and it was while home on the farm that he was induced to cast his destinies in Arcadia, with whose history his name has since been inseparably connected. His professional duties have taken him as far as Tacoma, Wash., Davis City, Iowa, and Jamestown, N. D. In Arcadia, where he is deeply loved and respected, he has been president of the village, president of the board of health, and president of the library board, of which last named body he is still the head. He was one of the founders of the Western Wisconsin Telephone Company, of which he is vice-president, and installed the first telephone in the Trempealeau Valley in this county. His financial interests also include stock in the Bank of Arcadia, in which he is a director, and whose destinies he has helped to shape. An active Republican in politics, he was chairman of the Republican County Committee for two terms, and in the old convention days was a delegate to many a political gathering, and the center of many a hot contest. For a time he was a member of the county board and has also served in other offices. He is a Thirty-second degree Mason and also associates fraternally with the Modern Woodmen, the United Workmen and the Beavers. He is a member of the American Medical Association, the State Medical Association and the Trempealeau. Jackson and Buffalo County Medical Association, and was first president of the Trempealeau County Medical Association, and at one time president of the Western Wisconsin Medical Society, now superseded by the individual county societies. He is also an active member of the Trempealeau County Historical Society. As a patriot he has given loyal service to this state and country. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American War he offered his services to the state, and became assistant surgeon of the First Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, with the rank of first lieutenant, serving through the war and being mustered out with the regiment at the close of the conflict. His kindly services so endeared him to the members of the regiment that upon the request of several of them the adjutant general recommended him to the governor for reappointment when the National Guard was reorganized. Accordingly he became assistant surgeon with the rank of first lieutenant on the staff of the Third Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, being promoted to captain in the same regiment in 1903. In 1912 he received his commission as major, and became chief surgeon of the Second Regiment. He was retired from military life June 13, 1915. Dr. Hidershide was married in September, 1892, to Joseph Agnes, daughter of Michael and Margaret (Pfeiffer) Agnes. Michael Agnes, a merchant, was the original proprietor of the townsite of Minneiska, Minn.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 754 - 757

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Thomas Hogan, proprietor of the Thomas Hogan & Son Lumber Company at Blair, was born in Kvitised, Telemarken, Norway, March 18, 1854, son of Knudt Tollefson and Gunhild Tvedt, the former of whom died in 1863 and the latter in 1862. The original family name was Hougen. Knudt Tollefson was a lieutenant in the standing army of Norway. The first of the family to come to America was Gunder (brother of Thomas), who reached this country in 1878. He was joined two years later by Thomas, at Humbird, Wis. For a time Thomas Hogan worked in the lumber yard there, then he secured employment in a sawmill four miles southeast of
Hatfield. So faithfully did he perform his duties there that after the first year he was placed in charge of the shipping. In 1886, with Simon Lein, he opened a lumber yard at Blair, under the firm name of Hogan & Lein.  Owing to ill health, Mr. Lein sold out to Mr. Hogan, and the firm became the Hogan Lumber & Stock Company. From 1898 until Jan. 1, 1917, the business was conducted under Mr. Hogan's name as an individual. Jan. 1, 1917, the firm became Thomas Hogan & Son. Mr. Hogan deals in all kinds of lumber and building material, and has built up a good business, the success of which has been due to his fairness and business integrity.  Mr. Hogan enjoys an excellent standing in the community and has served on the village council for eight years. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America. He was married Jan. 28, 1885, to Anna Olive Lynnes, who was born in Edsvald, Norway, daughter of Andrew and Johanna Lynnes, the former of whom now lives with the Hogan family.  Mr. and Mrs. Hogan have had six children : Louisa, Jennie, Clifford. Agnes, Gena and Arthur. Louisa lives at home. Jennie died at the age of 17 years; Clifford at the age of 24 years, and Agnes at the age of 15 years. Gena married Tosten Thompson, and they have two children, Truman and Ruth. Arthur married Mabel Johnstad and resides at Blair, where he is associated in business with his father in the firm of Thomas Hogan & Son. Mr. Hogan and family are affiliated religiously with the Lutheran church.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 557 - 558

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Christian J. Hogden, who is engaged in farming in Ettrick Township, having two farms of 80 acres each, in sections 26, 27, 15, was born in French Creek Valley, this county, Oct. 8, 1862.  His parents were John Anderson and Oliva (Anderson) Hogden, born in Vardar, Norway, the father July 4, 1832, and the mother April 14, 1830.  They were married in Norway and came to the United States in 1854, residing for about a year near Holmen, Wis., whence they removed to Trempealeau Valley.  Three years later John A. Hogden and his family removed to the farm where he now lives in section 23, Ettrick Township, having resided here over 60 years.  As a pioneer settler of the county he had to endure many hardships in early days, among other things being obliged to carry flour on his back from La Crosse to his home near Blair.  The Indians were then numerous, and often came to his cabin begging.  By humoring them and treating them in a friendly manner he got along with them without any trouble, and often traded with them for buckskins, blueberries or other wild products.  His farm contained 120 acres, to which he later added 100 acres more.  He engaged in general farming and stock raising and gradually became prosperous.  He was one of the founders of the Lutheran Congregation Church in this valley, and also assisted in organizing the Ettrick Creamery Company.  He was also a member of the township board in early days and assisted in organizing the schools and in building the first schoolhouse.  Bearing in mind his own early difficulties and trials, he was always glad to extend a helping hand to new settlers, giving them food and shelter and showing them how to build their cabins, break their land and do other work to which many of them had been unaccustomed.  During the Civil War he sent a substitute to serve for him, not being able to leave his family.  His wife died April 11, 1909, after many years of happy married life.  Their family included eight children, as follows:  Andrew, Carolina, John, Anna (deceased), Christian J., Peter, Julia and Ole.

Christian J. Hogden in his boyhood attended school in district No. 1, French Creek Valley, and resided at home until he was 21 years old.  After that he worked two winters in the pineries.  Being now ready to begin farming for himself, he rented his father's farm and operated it on that basis for three years.  At the end of that time he purchased his father-in-law's (Hans Madson) farm.  He has since continued to reside here and has prospered.  He has spent several thousand dollars in improving the place.  The two parts of the estate, each consisting of 80 acres, are separated about a mile and a half from each other.  They are provided with good buildings and are fully equipped for all purposes of modern farming.  Mr. Hogden is a stockholder in the Ettrick Creamery and also in the Farmers and Merchants' Bank at Galesville.  He was also formerly interested in the Western Wisconsin Telephone Company, in which, however, he has sold out his stock.  Mr. Hogden was first married, May 18, 1889, to Oleana Madson, who was born on this farm Oct. 30, 1864, daughter of Hans and Johanas (Olson) Madson. Her parents were natives of Norway and were early settlers in this township, coming here from Vernon County, where they had resided one summer.  Both are now deceased.  Mrs. Oleana Hogden died Feb. 19, 1899, leaving three children:  Josephine, born April 5, 1890, wife of Gust Erickson (her issue, Kilmer, Oleana and Goodwin), a farmer residing one mile north of Ettrick; Hans, born Feb. 5, 1895; Oscar, who is single and lives on the home farm; and Clara Otillie, born June 17, 1897, residing at home.  On Dec. 5, 1907, Mr. Hogden married for his second wife Miss Anna Larson, who was born at Hardie's Creek, Gale Township, this county, daughter of Matt and Agnes (Larson) Larson.  Her parents, both natives of Norway, came early to Trempealeau County, settling on Hardie's Creek, where the father died, after a career of many years engaged in farming and stock raising.  The widow still resides on the farm.  They had ten children, of whom their daughter Anna was the third in order of birth.  Of Mr. Hodgen's second marriage there are no children.  The family church is the French Creek Lutheran.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 370 - 371

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Frederick N. Hokland, formerly of the firm of Tom Lomsdahl & Co., Osseo, dealers in hardware, farm implements, agricultural machinery and automobiles, was born in Nordland, Norway, Sept. 22, 1853, son of Nels O. and Mary (Frederickson) Hokland. Nels O. Hokland came to America from Norway, with his family, in 1867, and farmed in Vernon County, Wisconsin, until 1872, when he came to Trempealeau County, and located in Pigeon Township, moving a year later to a farm in the east side of Hale Township, where he remained until 1903, when he moved to Osseo, where he now lives at the good old age of 83, making his home with his son, Frederick N., his wife having died in 1884. Frederick N. Hokland was reared on his father's farm. From 1897 to 1901 he was manager of the Whitehall & Pigeon Trading Association at Whitehall. In 1904, with Gilbert Lewis, he opened a hardware and implement store in Osseo, under the firm name of Lewis & Hokland. Tom Lomsdahl, in 1912, purchased the Lewis interest, and the firm was consolidated in Tom Lomsdahl & Co. Aside from building up a large trade, Mr. Hokland has found time for service as a member of the village council for four years. He was clerk of the school board of his district in Hale Township for eleven years.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 610

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Arthur Atwood Holmes, deputy state game warden and former sheriff of Trempealeau County, was born in Caledonia Township, this county, Feb. 23, 1862, son of Charles Francis and Lucy (Atwood) Holmes, natives respectively of Norway, Maine, and Addison, Vermont. He lost his mother as a boy of four years, and for several years was passed about among various relatives. For a time he lived with an uncle, Royal Atwood, in Waupun, Wis. Then he lived with Amos Whiting, another uncle, at West Prairie, Wis. For one year he was with Dr. Olson Atwood, an uncle living in Trempealeau. When about fourteen he went to Vermont, and lived with Norman Brooks, of the Brooks Edge Tool Company, Brooksville, manufacturers of fine tools. Then he came back to Trempealeau County, and after living in the village a while went on the farm with his father. Until 17 years of age he attended the Trempealeau Village schools, driving back and forth to the farm, or else riding a pony. After completing his schooling he remained on the farm until 1897, and then moved to Trempealeau Village, where he and his family took up their residence in the old home of Judge A. W. Newman, where they still live. After moving to the village, Mr. Holmes still continued to operate the farm for two years. For a time he served as deputy under Sheriff Elmer Immel, and on Jan. 1, 1903, became sheriff, an office he efficiently held for one term, during which time he lived at Whitehall. In the winter of 1905 he moved to Trempealeau. In 1907-08-09 he was a member of the county board. His appointment to his present position as deputy state game warden dates from March 30, 1910. Mr. Holmes has a variety of interests and holds stock in the Citizens' State Bank of Trempealeau, the Western Wisconsin Telephone Company, the Arctic Spring Creamery of Galesville, Wis., and the Trempealeau Lime Products Company, of which last named company he is vice-president. Mr. Holmes was manned April 5, 1883, to Nettie E. Booher, daughter of William T. Booher, a general merchant of Trempealeau. This union has been blessed with four children, Cyril Theodore, Lucy, Charles Arthur and Harold Frederick. Cyril Theodore was born May 20, 1884, and was married June 11, 1912, to Zella Case, of Cashton, Minn. Lucy was born Jan. 9, 1887, and teaches in the Trempealeau schools. Charles Arthur was born Feb. 1, 1892, graduated from University of Wisconsin and is now a civil engineer. Harold Frederick was born Aug. 19, 1897, graduated from the University of Wisconsin, and is now a civil engineer.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 376

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Charles Francis Holmes, a pioneer, was born in Norway, Maine, Jan. 25, 1823, and spent his boyhood and young manhood in the New England states.  In 1850, leaving his wife at Slaterville, R. I., he came west, looking for a new home.  Reaching La Crosse, May 1, 1850, he came directly to Trempealeau Village, then called Reed's Landing, and after looking about for a while, secured a farm in Caledonia Township.  In the spring of 1853 he returned to Rhode Island, where his young wife had died, and in the fall of that year came back to Trempealeau County, bringing with him his child Corintha that had been born during his absence, and his father, mother and two sisters.  Some time later he married Lucy Atwood, who died in November, 1866, leaving two children:  Herman and Arthur A.  In 1868, Mr. Holmes sold his farm to his brother-in-law, Royal Atwood of Waupun, Wis., and took up his home with relatives in Trempealeau Village. While living here he was elected sheriff of the county.  Late in the fall of 1874, when his term had almost expired, he went to Caledonia.  The next spring he came back, and continued to reside in the village until 1878.  Then he purchased a farm in Trempealeau Township, where he followed agricultural pursuits until his death, Jan. 25, 1900.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 375 - 376

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Hans Holtan was born in Vik, Sogn, Norway, Jan. 9, 1834, son of Anfin and Gjertrud Holtan. The mother died in the old country and in 1846 the father, with his second wife Turi and his children, came to America, settling in Pleasant Springs Township, Dane County, where the father and stepmother spent the remainder of their days, the former dying Sept. 1, 1872, and the latter about 1865. Hans Holtan was reared to farm pursuits, and with the exception of a few years from 1906 to 1910, when he lived at Stoughton, Wis., remained on the home farm until his death, Jan. 1, 1911. In 1858 Hans Holtan was married to Raandi Lunde, who was born in Laurdal, Telemarken, Norway, Sept. 30, 1833, and came to America with her parents, Austin and Jorond Lunde, in 1851. Austin Lunde died in 1884, and his wife in 1857. Mrs. Hans Holtan died Jan. 23, 1906, having been the mother of the following children: Anfin and Austin, who are farmers in Dane County, Wisconsin; John, a tobacco dealer in Stoughton, Wis., of which city he was formerly mayor for three terms; Gertrude, wife of Louis Severson, also a tobacco dealer of Stoughton; George, a farmer in Dane County; Ole, a tobacco dealer in Stoughton; Andrew, who is farming in Dane County; Josie, wife of Albert Asleson, a farmer of Dane County, and Richard H. of Whitehall, Wis.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 558

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Richard H. Holtan, dealer in leaf tobacco at Whitehall, Wis., was born in Dane County, this state, Aug. 11, 1876, son of Hans and Randi (Lunde) Holtan. He resided at home with his parents until his marriage, Oct. 28, 1897, when he engaged in farming for himself until 1902. He then moved to Stoughton, engaging in the tobacco business under the style of Richard Holtan & Co. After carrying on the business there until 1905 he moved to Whitehall, establishing himself here August 28. In 1914 the concern was incorporated with a capital stock of $45,000, taking the name of the Holtan Leaf Tobacco Company, with John Holtan, president; R. H. Holtan, secretary, and 0. H. Holtan, treasurer. The concern has two offices, one at Whitehall and the other at Stoughton, with warehouses at Stoughton. R. H. Holtan is also vice-president of the People's State Bank of Whitehall. He has served four years as a member of the village council and was its president three years. Fraternally he is a member of the Beavers and Odd Fellows, in which latter order he has passed all the chairs. Mr. Holtan was married Oct. 28, 1897, to Betsey Johnson of Utica, Dane County, who was born Nov. 24, 1876, daughter of Jokum and Aasil (Smithback) Johnson. This union has been blessed with two children: Herbert, born Oct. 7, 1898, and Rollin A., born Dec. 7, 1902. Jokum Johnson, farmer and merchant, now residing at Stoughton, Wis., was born in Nummedal, Norway, in 1853, and came to America in 1871, settling in Dane County, Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming. In 1894 he became a merchant at Utica, in the same county, and in 1910 retired and moved to his present home. He married Aasil Smithback, who died March 24, 1909, at the age of 59 years. They were the parents of six children : Oscar, residing in the township of Christiania, Dane County, Wis. ; Betsey (Mrs. R. H. Holtan); Aline, who died at the age of two years; Emma (Mrs. Sorensen); Nellie of Utica, Dane County, who married E. Adolph Johnson, and Olga, now Mrs. B. Logan of Christiania, Dane County.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 558 - 559

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Even Holte, one of the enterprising and successful farmers and dairymen of Unity Township, was born in Westertoten, Norway, Nov. 16, 1859. His father, Andreas Holte, who was a farmer, and his mother, Olena Paulseth, died in Norway. Even Holte was a young man in his nineteenth year when he emigrated to the United States in 1879. Settling in Unity Township, Trempealeau County, Wis., he found employment working on farms for about a year, and then, having made up his mind to be his own boss, rented the farm of Christ Olson, which he operated for five years. During the five years following he rented the farm of C. Quale, and then, being in a position to purchase a farm of his own, bought the first 120 acres of his present farm, which he has since enlarged by purchase up to its present size of 320 acres. His improvements since he took hold of the place have greatly increased its value, one of the most notable being a frame barn, built in 1901, which measures 34 by 70 by 20 feet above stone basement, having cement floors and stanchions, and in connection with which there is an L, 30 by 30 by 20 feet, for horses. Having thus provided for his stock, Mr. Holte, in 1903, built himself a new residence, a two-story and basement structure, 30 by 34 feet, containing eight rooms and heated with hot air furnace. The other buildings on the farm are also substantial and equipped with modern conveniences. Mr. Holte raises pure-bred Holstein cattle, having a herd of 53, and using a three-unit milking machine. His silo is of frame construction, plastered with cement plaster inside and out. He was one of the organizers of the Unity Co-operative Creamery at Strum and was its secretary for ten years, and is a stockholder in the First State Bank of Strum. Although a busy man, Mr. Holte has devoted some part of his time to aiding in local government affairs. Thus he was township treasurer eight years, school treasurer three years and a director of the school board three years and is now treasurer of the school district, making a good record as a public official. His business holdings include stock in the State Bank of Strum, of which he is a director. For 15 years he has been secretary of the Synod Norwegian Lutheran Church, to which he belongs as a member. For nearly 30 years Mr. Holte has led a domestic life, having been united in marriage July 2, 1887, to Marie Rice of Unity Township, who was born in Vernon County, Wisconsin, April 28, 1867. Her father, Simon Rice, and her mother, whose maiden name was Mathea Bergum, were Norwegians, the former being born at Little Hammer, Norway, June 21, 1845, and the latter at Land, Norway, Oct. 24, 1845. Simon came to America in 1854, settling in Vernon County, this state, whence in 1869 he came to Unity Township, Trempealeau County, where he was subsequently engaged in farming until his death. May 21, 1901. He was one of those hardy settlers, almost pioneers, who broke the land and helped to lay the foundations of that agricultural prosperity of which the present generation enjoys the advantage. His wife, who survived him, is now living on the old home farm in section 30, Unity Township. The family circle of Mr. and Mrs. Even Holte has been rounded out to good dimensions by the birth of ten children, whose record in brief is as follows: Minnie, born Nov. 21, 1888, and now residing in Chicago; Olga, born Dec. 16, 1890, who is living at home; Julia, born Dec. 28, 1892, who graduated at River Falls normal school and is a teacher in the fourth grade at Marmarth, N. D.; Laura, born Feb. 23, 1895, who is the wife of Edwin Rognlien, a bank cashier of Foster, Wis., and Seymour, born April 20, 1897; Josephine, born July 18, 1899; Nordahl, born Dec. 20, 1902; Lillian, born Feb. 3, 1904; Evelyn, born Dec. 18, 1906, and Alton, born Dec. 12, 1908, who are all living at home.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 636 - 637

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Florison D. Hopkins, county treasurer, and president of the Auto Sales Co. of Whitehall, was born on the Hopkins homestead in Preston Township, July 12, 1861, son of James and Angelina (Van Sickle) Hopkins. He attended the district schools, and was reared to farm pursuits. As a young man, he purchased a tract of 160 acres adjoining the homestead, and set about developing it, erecting a home, barns and other buildings, and building up a splendid farm. For a time he also rented the homestead. Reared in the home of prominent and influential people, it was natural that his attention should early turn to public affairs. In the old Convention days, he was delegate to many a convention that has helped to make political history in the county and state. For eight years he was chairman of the township, and for one term he was treasurer. His excellent service on the school board extended over a period of fifteen years. Upon the solicitation of his friends he ran for county treasurer in the fall of 1916, and was elected by a comfortable majority. His work in this important office has met with general approval, his wide acquaintance, his knowledge of the county and its people, his genial disposition, and his clear-cut business methods all being factors in favor with which he is held. In 1913 Mr. Hopkins sold his farm and took up his residence in the village. In Whitehall he purchased an interest in the Auto Sales Co. and is now its president. Reared as he was on the farm, he has continued his interest in outdoor life. He is an enthusiastic motorist, and takes especial delight in fishing, seeking both health and recreation at this pastime. Mr. Hopkins was married Aug. 26, 1885, to Nellie Shephard, the daughter of Henry and Phelina Shephard, pioneers of Preston township. This union has been blessed with four children: Goldie, Deva, Margaret and Harley J. Goldie is the wife of E. A. Guyton, M. D., of Eau Claire, Wis.; Deva is the wife of Sidney Jacquist, of Blair, Wis.; Margaret is the wife of Oscar Dahle, of Whitehall, Wis.; and Harley J. is a corporal in the Marine Service, having previously been a student in the University of Wisconsin.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 726

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James Hopkins, for many years a leading citizen of Trempealeau County, came to this region as a youth with the earliest settlers, grew up with the country, and became an integral part of its life and progress. Born in Leeds, Yorkshire, England, Oct. 5, 1839, he was but 8 years of age when his parents, John and Mary Hopkins, came to America and took up their home in Troy, Walworth County, this State. In 1855 they came to Trempealeau County and located on the north bank of the Trempealeau River, in the western part of Preston Township. In this primitive spot they erected a sod home and later a log cabin, and started to develop the fertile tract which has since been known as the Hopkins farm. Comforts and conveniences were lacking, farm and domestic equipment was of the crudest, marketing and trading facilities were of the poorest, the nearest point at which provisions could be secured being Galesville, far away and over the rugged bluffs. Often, while a mere boy, James Hopkins went to the mill at Galesville and brought back flour and other provisions on his back, or in the winter on a hand sled, trudging his way over the rough and sometimes dangerous trail. With the passing of the years and the growth of the county, conditions changed, and the farm became a beautiful estate in the midst of a thickly-settled community. Here the parents spent the remainder of their years, the father dying Jan. 9, 1888, and the mother Feb. 27, 1875. James Hopkins continued to live on the home farm improving and developing it, and successfully carrying on general farming. He was an important factor both in public service and in the business life of the region in which he lived. As a farmer he was the staunch friend and the earnest advocate of the agricultural interests of the county. A thorough believer in cooperative effort among farmers, he was active in the Preston Creamery Company and the Farmers' Trading Association, both at Blair, and served for a time as president of each. At the annual meetings of the Trempealeau County Agricultural and Driving Association, held at Whitehall, in years past, he was always a prominent figure. He did good service as chairman of his township, and as treasurer and clerk of his school district, also doing excellent work several different terms as deputy sheriff. He was faithful to every public trust committed to his cafe. He held the conscientious discharge of every public duty above personal or private consideration. He was a firm believer in Prohibition and strove earnestly and persistently to bring it about. His was a positive nature, whatever he believed, he believed with all his might, and he had the courage to avow his convictions, as well as the ability to assert them, yet he was a just man, able to see the other side of public questions as well as his own, and demanding of himself an even stricter standard than he expected of others. In a few words, he had common sense, an honest heart and tireless energy. About a year before his death Mr. Hopkins, accompanied by his wife, went to Seattle, Wash., intending to remain there with their sons. While there he was stricken with paralysis. Realizing that he had not long to live, and desiring to see his old friends again, he returned to Whitehall. Thus it was his good fortune when the end came, April 17, 1913, to be under his own roof, surrounded by family and friends so near and dear to him. Through his illness he was uniformly cheerful and bright, and bore his sufferings, which were at times intense, with remarkable patience. The faithful wife, son and daughter were with him to administer to every want, and to extend him that sympathy which one's own alone can give. He lies buried in Lincoln Cemetery, at Whitehall, in and near which village he had spent the greater part of his life. Mr. Hopkins was married to Angelina Van Sickle, and their
union was blessed with five children.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 724 - 726

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E. Scott Hotchkiss, pioneer, business man, agriculturist, former sheriff and former United States consul, is one of the most prominent men in the county. In commercial life he has assisted in the development of the mercantile, milling and lumber business since his first arrival in 1859, and he has been actively identified not only with rural progress, but also with the intimate life of two prosperous villages. In public service, within the county, he most efficiently occupied the office of sheriff for a term, he was a valued member of the county board for four years, he was a capable town clerk for twelve years, he was justice of the peace and court commissioner several terms, and in addition to this has held numerous local offices, and has been a member of various committees and delegations. As United States consul to two Canadian cities he assisted materially in exploiting and promoting American trade interests within the Dominion. As a Mason he has taken a deep interest in the Ancient Rites, and cherishes a number of important mementoes which have been handed down in his family from generation to generation. E. Scott Hotchkiss was born at Cairo, Green County, N. Y., March 27, 1837, son of Henry E. and Alice (Smith) Hotchkiss, and a grandson of Lemuel Hotchkiss, who served from Connecticut in the Revolutionary War, was a personal friend of DeWitt Clinton, governor of New York, and a prominent leader in Master and Royal Arch Masonry. The subject of this sketch was educated in the district schools, and has supplemented this training by wide reading and observation. He was designed to follow his father's occupation as a cabinet maker, but deciding to seek the broader opportunities of the west, he left his old home in 1856, and located in Richland County, this state. In 1859 he joined a colony, and set out for Osseo, where he homesteaded the southwest quarter of section 14, Sumner Township. He broke, improved and developed this land, until 1868, when he sold out, and engaged in the general mercantile business at Osseo with W. H. Thomas. In 1870 he and Mr. Thomas, together with William Fuller, built the Sumner Mill at Osseo, now owned by J. N. Lee. Soon after this he traded his interest in the store for Mr. Fuller's interest in the mill, and took over its active management. In 1872 he and J. L. Linderman built the Linderman Mills, one mile west of Osseo, on the Beef River. The mills were destroyed by fire in 1880, but were a once rebuilt, and are still operated by members of the Linderman family. In 1876 Mr. Hotchkiss was elected sheriff of Trempealeau County, and so excellent was his record in this capacity that he was retained as under sheriff under K. K. Hagestad, his successor. In 1880, upon the expiration of this service, a favorable business opening presented itself at Independence, so, coming here, he purchased a lumber yard in the village, and a farm on the village limits. He still owns the farm, and he and his son Frank A. operate it, though both live in the village. The lumber yard was sold to John Sprecher and is now operated by the Sprecher Lumber Company. It was in 1902 that Mr. Hotchkiss received his greatest opportunity for public service. In that year, through the influence of Senator John C. Spooner, he was appointed by President Theodore Roosevelt as American consul at Brockville, Ontario, Canada. When that consulate was abandoned in 1906 he was sent to establish the consulate at Calgary, Alberta, Canada. When he went there American business represented but 45 percent of that city's imports. The official records show that owing to the work of the consulate during his administration the American business was increased until it represented 90 percent of the imports. In the fall of 1913, Mr. Hotchkiss retired, owing to the change of administration. In the meantime he had been offered, but had refused, the consulate at Hobart, Tasmania. Since then Mr. Hotchkiss has led a retired life at Independence, looking after his numerous holdings and interests. Mr. Hotchkiss' career as a Mason dates from 1872, when he joined the Blue Lodge at Augusta, Wis., being raised in March, 1873. He is now a member of the Blue Lodge at Whitehall, has served as its senior warden, and has been presented with a beautiful token in acknowledgment of his long fidelity in the work. He belongs to the Chapter and Commandery at La Crosse, having originally joined the Chapter there and the Commandery at Brockville, Ontario. Mr. Hotchkiss was married Dec. 16, 1862, to Harriet A. Field, a daughter of Robert C. and Mary (Stoddard) Field, intimately associated with the early history of Osseo and Sumner. After a long and useful life, filled with good deeds and gracious kindliness, she died Nov. 6, 1915, leaving two children: Alice and Frank A.  Alice lives in Milwaukee, and is the mother of two children, Claude and Albert Maurer. Frank A. is president of the Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Independence.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 766 - 767

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Frank A. Hotchkiss, banker, public official, farmer, horse fancier and man-of-affairs, is well known throughout the county, and his advocacy of good roads, during his term of office as chairman of the county board, places him in the ranks of the county's most useful and constructive citizens. With keen business insight he combines a genial temperament, with a nature of unbounded enthusiasm in good work he combines a proper conservatism, and with a thorough belief in progress he combines the sincere conviction that all progress must be founded upon the firm ground of expediency and common sense. A native of this county, and connected with several of its most prominent pioneer families, he was born in Osseo, this county, Oct. 18, 1866, the son of E. Scott and Harriett A. (Field) Hotchkiss. He received a good education in the schools of Osseo, Arcadia and Independence, and early in life determined to devote his life to agricultural pursuits. As he grew to manhood he devoted his time and attention to the improving and developing of his father's farm at Independence, and as a hobby became more and more interested in the breeding of pure-blooded Percheron and Belgian horses, and developed a string of trotters and pacers that won many a prize at fairs and racing meets. Of late years, however, his attention has turned more and more to public and commercial life. In 1916 he with others organized the Farmers & Merchants State Bank, of which he became president. He is likewise president of the Independence Grain & Stock Company. Both of these institutions are important factors in the business and financial life of Independence, and under his fostering care are constantly growing in size and importance. In 1900 he became a member of the village council and served for several terms.  It was in 1904 that he was elected to the county board, of which he was chairman in 1914, 1915 and 1916. He has served on numerous committees on the board, and his work is acknowledged as having always been for the best interests of the people of the county at large. Being of a fraternal disposition, he has affiliated himself with the Blue Lodge and Chapter of the Masonic order, and he is likewise a popular member of the Independent Order of Foresters. Mr. Hotchkiss was married Oct. 18, 1893, to Agnes Muir, born in Buffalo County, this state, June 25, 1870, daughter of James and Martha (Faulds) Muir. This union has been blessed with three children: Ina A., born May 28, 1896; Eldridge Scott, born April 13, 1906, and Robert Addison, born April 7, 1912.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 767 - 768

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Jacob Hotz, a resident of Arcadia Village, is a man who has conquered fortune by industry and perseverance in spite of adverse circumstances. He was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, May 24, 1864, son of Adam and Margaret E. (Sior) Hotz. His parents were both born in Germany, the father May 8, 1834, and the mother March 26, 1837. In 1882 the family came to America, landing in New York, from which city they proceeded direct to Arcadia, Wis. They were very poor and the expenses of the voyage had almost depleted their scanty resources. During the first year in this country Adam Hotz worked at the trade of blacksmith, which he had followed in the old country, going from place to place to find employment. In 1883 he opened a shop in Arcadia, and did general blacksmith work, being handicapped, however, by the fact that he was unable to shoe horses, but his skill as a lock and gunsmith was of assistance to him. He continued in business in Arcadia until his death, which occurred June 26, 1895. His wife died in 1915, aged 78 years. Jacob Hotz, who was an only child, was 18 years old when his parents settled in Arcadia. He soon found work on a farm and was thus occupied during the summers until he had reached the age of 21, attending Arcadia high school in the winters. He then went to work for Dr. George N. Hidershide, in whose employ he continued for five years without the loss of a day. In the spring of 1890 he went to Winona, Minn., where he was employed in a greenhouse, but stayed only a short time, as he found his pay was uncertain. Returning to Arcadia, he again went to work for Dr. Hidershide and was there one year. After the death of his father he was left with the care and support of his widowed mother. In the fall of 1896 he was offered and accepted the position of janitor in the Arcadia public schools, and although now 32 years of age, on small wages and with his mother to support, he determined to improve his education by taking the high school course, and accordingly did so, graduating in 1900 with honor at the age of 36, an example of what may be achieved by courage and determination. A year before he graduated he gave another proof of his courage by marrying, Aug. 17, 1899, Mary Jegi, daughter of Simon and Agnes (Dascher) Jagi of West Arcadia, bringing her to his home. However, he had gained confidence in himself by this time, and it is safe to say that he has never regretted what some people might have regarded as a premature marriage. He was the more confident, as one year after entering the high school he had laid the foundation for future success in a business way by purchasing the old fairground in Arcadia, a plot of land of 17 acres, with buildings and surrounded by a fence. From the material in the fence and buildings he erected his present buildings—a two-story, brick veneer house of nine rooms, and a frame barn, 24 by 48 by 20 feet, for hay and stock. In 1915 Mr. Hotz added 14 adjoining acres to his property, having now 31 acres, all within the village limits. He does a dairy business, keeping 12 cows and selling the milk, also raises small fruits and keeps 50 swarms of bees, and in addition to all this is a stockholder in the Western Wisconsin Telephone Company. Some of the money for his investments was earned during his high school period by selling nursery stock and old line life insurance. Had not the care of his mother devolved upon him at that time he would have taken the complete agricultural course in the Wisconsin University, as he had taken as his motto, "It is never too late for one to learn." As it is, his present prosperity has been well earned, and is visible in the thrifty and flourishing appearance of his little farm. He and his wife are among the highly respected people of the village. They have no children of their own, but have three boys in their home whom they are taking care of and educating. Mr. Hotz was reared in the German Lutheran faith, but when a young man embraced the German Evangelical doctrines. His wife is also a German Evangelical in religion. In politics Mr. Hotz is independent, voting for the man rather than for the party.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 679 - 681

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Ole O. Hovre, recently county treasurer of Trempealeau County, was born in Guldbrandsdalen, Norway, Feb. 14, 1864. His father, Ole O. Hovre, also a native of Norway, came to the United States on 1874, settling in Ettrick Township, where he homesteaded land in section 2 in 1876. He died on his farm in 1900 at the age of 70 years. Ole O. Hovre married Sonnov Husmoen, who survives him and still resides on the homestead, being now 78 years old. They had six children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the first-born. Ole O. Hovre, Jr., was graduated from Gale College in 1886. He then went to Spink County, S. D., where he remained until 1890, working on farms during the summers and teaching school in the winters. At the end of that period he bought a general store in Hale, Trempealeau County, Wis., and conducted it for 26 years, or until the spring of 1916, when he sold out. He was elected county treasurer in the fall of 1914 and served two years. He has lately purchased a farm in Taintor Township, Dunn County, to which he intends to remove after Jan. 1, 1917. Mr. Hovre served as clerk of Hale township for 12 years. He was also clerk of School District No. 3 for eight years. For 24 years he served as deacon of the Norwegian Lutheran Synod church, acting as secretary for six years. He was also justice of the peace for 24 years. Mr. Hovre was married May 13, 1891, to Mathia Bole, of Ettrick, Wis., who was born there Feb. 7, 1871, daughter of Juuhl and Ingri Bole. Her father, who was born in Norway, came to America in 1875, locating in Vernon County, Wis., from which place after a year he came to Ettrick. He died in 1914 at the age of 89 years. His wife still lives on the old farm, having now attained the age of 90 years. Mr. and Mrs. Hovre have had a family of 10 children: Selma, residing at home; Olga, who lives in Culbertson, Mont., where she is employed as a bookkeeper; May, who is the wife of the Rev. Folkestad, of Strum, Wis.; and Helmer, Hazel, Myrtle, Lillian M., Orvel, Allice and Catherine, all of whom are residing at home except Lilliam [sic] M., who died at the age of 2 years.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 624 - 625

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Bernhard Hulberg, a rising young garage man of Osseo, was born in Hale Township, this county, March 27, 1887, and was reared to farm pursuits, attaining a good rudimentary education in the district schools. He became interested in the automobile industry, and seeing an opening at Osseo, formed a partnership with his brother, Conrad, and engaged in the garage business in this village, occupying a building which was erected for them in 1915 by O. C. Gullard. Mr. Hulberg is now connected with the Amundson Garage, in whose success he is a valued factor. He was married May 10, 1916, to Helga Brateng, who was born Dec. 22, 1891. The parents of Mr. Hulberg were Edward and Paulina (Raa) Hulberg, natives of Norway, who came to Hale Township some forty years ago, the father now living in Osseo, and the mother having died in 1896.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 662 - 663

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Conrad Hulberg, a popular young automobile man, was born in Hale Township, April 4, 1891. He went to the neighborhood schools, learned farming from his father, and early became an adept in mechanics. With his brother he engaged in the garage business at Osseo for a while, and is now employed in the Hohmann Garage at Arcadia, where he is doing excellent work. He is a good workman, a master of his trade, and a genial friend.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 663

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Clarence F. Huleatt, secretary and treasurer of the Huleatt Mercantile Co., and a leading merchant of Whitehall, was born in Bogus Valley, near Pepin, Wis., March 30, 1866, son of Thomas P. and Maria A. (Clarke) Huleatt. He was reared on the farm, attended the district schools of Pepin County, and graduated from the River Falls State Normal School, in 1892. Thus prepared, he taught school for several years, part of which time he was principal of the Whitehall schools. In the spring of 1897 he and L. M. Ekern became owners of the hardware and furniture store of Peterson & Ekern, at Whitehall, under the firm name of Huleatt & Ekern. In 1899 Mr. Huleatt bought out his partner's interest, and with his uncle, Samuel Huleatt, established the firm of Huleatt & Huleatt. In 1900 the Huleatt Mercantile Company was incorporated with a capital stock of $6,000, the officers and owners being: President, Thomas F. Huleatt; treasurer, Samuel H. Huleatt, and secretary, Clarence F. Huleatt. Clarence F. Huleatt is now the secretary and treasurer, and his wife is the president. The firm does a large business in furniture, hardware and appliances, and has a large business in installing heating plants and doing general plumbing work. Mr. Huleatt also conducts a funeral directing department, having taken lectures on undertaking at Milwaukee and St. Paul under the leading embalmers of the country. The building, erected in 1900, occupies a prominent place on Main street, and is of modern construction, 30 by 80 feet. Mr. Huleatt has been a member of the village council for two years. He has passed through the chairs of the local I. O. O. F. Lodge. His religious affiliations are with the Whitehall Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is a trustee. Mr. Huleatt was married Dec. 23, 1896, to Mary E. Shane, of Modena, county superintendent of schools, Buffalo County, Wis., born March 20, 1864, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (McEldowney) Shane, natives of Ireland.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 388 - 389

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Thomas P. Huleatt was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, the son of Thomas and Jane (Harden) Huleatt, who brought their family to America in 1850, and after living in Rock Island, Ill., for a year, settled in Pepin County, this State, taking up their home in Bogus Valley. There the parents spent the remainder of their days, having achieved by hard work and frugality a position of influence and importance in the community. Thomas P. Huleatt spent his youth on the home farm, and as he grew to manhood determined to devote his life to farming. As a young man he acquired a good farm, which he successfully conducted for many years. He was well thought of in his neighborhood, and occupied a number of local offices in the county and on the school board. After a long and useful career in Pepin County, he came to Whitehall, in 1899, and here resided until his lamented death in 1906. Mr. Huleatt was married, in 1865, at Pepin, Wis., to Maria A. Clarke, who was born in Pennsylvania, in 1845, and died in 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Huleatt had two children: Clarence F., a merchant of Whitehall, and Eva, the wife of Watson Leach, a carpenter at Zion City, Ill.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 388

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Bert L. Hume, blacksmith and general machinist, now conducting a plant at Osseo, was born in Otter Creek Township, Eau Claire County, Wis., Feb. 26, 1883, son of Alexander and Amanda (Root) Hume. Alexander Hume was born in Canada, came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1863, and lived in Eau Claire County until his death in 1902, his wife still living in Osseo. Bert L. was reared to farm pursuits by his father and remained on the home place until 1901, when he went to Augusta, and learned the blacksmith trade. In 1909 he came to Osseo, and purchased the shop of E. Nelson & Son, which he has since conducted. The shop was destroyed by fire on Aug. 30, 1911, and Mr. Hume then built his present plant. The building is of concrete, 40 by 40 feet, well equipped for all kinds of blacksmith and machinery work and automobile repairing. A feature of the plant is a large oxygen-acetylene welding apparatus, and the trip hammer, drill press and two lathes add to the efficiency of the work done. The shop occupied the corner of Thomas and Main streets, the site of the first house built in the village of Osseo. Mr. Hume is well liked in the community, and is a member of the Modern Woodmen and of the Woodmen of the World. He was married Sept. 24, 1903, to Emma M. Krienke, of Otter Creek Township, Eau Claire County, daughter of Fred and Bertha (Bethe) Krienke. Fred Krienke was a native of Germany, served in the German army, and was a pioneer in Eau Claire County. Mr. and Mrs. Hume have five children:  Edna, Selma, Margaret, Edwin and Alice.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 610 - 611

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James N. Hunter, farmer, township chairman, member of the county board, bank director, and man of many interests, was born in Clackmannanshire, Scotland, June 21, 1852, son of William and Jane (Neish) Hunter, with whom he came to American in 1852.  He grew to young manhood near Pittsburg, Penn., and in 1870 with his father, brother and sisters, came to Trempealeau County, and located in section 5, Burnside Township, where he has since resided.  Coming here as a youth, he has led his life day by day, uprightly and honorably, and has won the respect and esteem of the entire county.  Since 1898 he has been chairman of the township board and a member of the county board, having served as president of the latter body for four years.  He has served as justice of the peace for many years, and as health officer of the township he has looked after the physical welfare of the community.  His financial holdings include stock in the Farmers & Merchants Bank of Independence, in which he is a director.  His broad interest in the county and its affairs is shown by his work as president of the Trempealeau County Historical Society.  Fraternally his associations are with the Masonic lodge at Arcadia.  He is unmarried.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 613

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John Hunter, who is successfully engaged in farming in section 35, Gale Township, was born on the farm of his parents at Decorah Prairie which adjoins his present farm, April 4, 1871.  John Hunter was educated in the district school at Decorah Prairie.  He resided with his parents, assisting on the home farm, until he was about 27 years old and then went to Nebraska, where he engaged in farming and stock raising, remaining four years.  He then sold out his interests there and returned to Trempealeau County.  In 1908 he purchased his present farm and has since been engaged here in general farming.  He has made practically all the improvements on his place; his farm is fertile, giving good yields of the ordinary crops, and his buildings are in good condition.  He is also a stockholder in the La Crosse Packing Company.  Mr. Hunter was married, Dec. 21, 1898, to Effie Bidwell, who was born in Easton, Adams County, Wis., daughter of Jacob and Julia (Vanhooser) Bidwell.  Her father, who was born Nov. 15, 1845, in Easton, Adams County, N. Y., was a soldier in the Civil War, going to the front as a member of Company K, 38th Wisconsin Volunteers.  At the end of his military service he settled at Easton, Wis., and engaged in farming until some time before his death, which took place in 1884.  His wife died Nov. 16, 1913, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Hunter, where her last years were spent.  They had six children, of whom their daughter Effie was the third born.  Mr. and Mrs. Hunter have two children:  Maud Arleen, born Oct. 29, 1904, and Edith Margaret, born July 5, 1907, both of whom reside at home.  In politics Mr. Hunter is independent.  Both Mr. and Mrs. Hunter are members of the Order of Beavers.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 363

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Thomas Hunter, a prosperous citizen of Galesville, where he is engaged in the hardware business, was born at Decorah Prairie, on his parents' farm, Nov. 15, 1868, son of Thomas Russell and Agnes (Grant) Hunter; a memoir of whom may be found on another page of this volume.  Of their 11 children, he was the fourth in order of birth.  In his boyhood he attended district school at Decorah Prairie and when 15 years old began working in the woods for Michals & Co., of Onalaska, Wis.  After being thus employed for the winter, in the following spring he worked on the river as a log driver.  He remained at this occupation for seven years and for the next five years was employed on steamboats on the Mississippi River.  Then going to Chase County, Neb., where he was engaged in farming until Jun, 1894, when he returned to Galesville, Wis.  After residing at home for one season, or more, he married, Jan. 19, 1897, to Blanche Cram, who was born in Galesville, Wis., daughter of Almon E. and Isabelle (Gunderson) Cram, of Gale Township.  In 1903 he returned to Nebraska and for one year was engaged in cattle ranching.  Then selling his ranch, he drove a span of mules to Minneapolis and worked there for a sugar factory a short time.  Returning again to Galesville, he bought a farm near the village and operated it two years, at the end of which time he sold it to John Dick and opened his present hardware store in Galesville.  He carries a full line of shelf and heavy hardware and his trade is constantly increasing.  He also operates a threshing machine and clover puller each season and owns property in the village of Galesville.  His fraternal affiliations are with the Beavers and Red Men, and he is also a member of the Galesville Fire Department.  Mr. Hunter's wife died Dec. 18, 1914, leaving five children:  Rose Almon, Russell, Bruce Raymond, Thomas Russell and Marion, all of whom are residing at home.  In politics Mr. Hunter is a Socialist, but has taken no active part in local government.  He is an enterprising and industrious citizen, successful in business, and has a wide circle of friends in this part of the county.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 529 - 530

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Thomas R. Hunter, one of the pioneers of Trempealeau County, who came here more than 60 years ago, was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, about eight miles from the city of Glasgow, Nov. 26, 1836, son of John and Agnes (Ferguson) Hunter, his parents being natives of the same locality.  In 1842 John Hunter came alone to the United States, his family following in 1848.  For about a year he operated a mine at Bloomsberg, Pa., then moved to Clinton County, Pa., and from there to Maryland, where he remained about 18 months.  In the summer of 1853 he came to Wisconsin, locating in La Crosse County, where he remained about six weeks.  He then came to Decorah Prairie, near Galesville, Trempealeau County, which locality was then, however, a part of La Crosse County.  In the following year Trempealeau County was organized and John Hunter became the first treasurer of Gale Township.  He obtained land, which he set to work to develop and improve, and was thus engaged when his death occurred in 1864.  He and his wife were the parents of ten children, of whom the youngest and the only one now living is Thomas Russell, the subject of this sketch.

Thomas R. Hunter was a lad of 17 years when he accompanied his parents to Trempealeau County.  He assisted his father on the farm until the latter's death and then became its owner, his father leaving it to him by will.  Here he has since resided, carrying on general farming. He has 180 acres of highly improved land, all a part of the original homestead, which is now operated by his youngest son Robert.  The nearest trading point when he came to this farm was La Crosse.  The Indians frequently came to the vicinity, but never molested him.  In fact he had some warm friends among them, frequently gave them shelter over night and was thanked by them for his favors.  Mr. Hunter was the instigator and prime mover in having the bridge across Black River constructed, on the main Galesville - La Crosse road, this improvement being accomplished in 1895.  It is known as "Hunter's bridge," this name being given to it by the La Crosse County board.  When a young man living in the state of Maryland, Mr. Hunter was a member of the denomination known as Bible Christians.  He has never joined any church in Trempealeau County, but for over 50 years has been connected with the Sunday school at Decorah Prairie.  In politics he is independent.  He was township chairman two years and was two years a member of the side board.  Thomas R. Hunter was married Oct. 31, 1862, to Agnes Grant, who was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, May 28, 1842.  When a child of six years she accompanied her parents to the United States, the family settling on Big Sandy River in Kentucky.  After residing there until 1855 or 1856 they came to Wisconsin, traveling by rail to Prairie du Chien, from there by boat to Trempealeau, and by team to Gale Township.  Here Mr. Grant bought land and engaged in farming.  He died on his homestead about 1871 and his wife about 1877.  They had four children, of whom their daughter Agnes was second in order of birth. Thomas Hunter and wife have 11 children:  Walter, residing on an adjoining farm, who married Jeanette Oliver of Gale Township and has eight children; Elizabeth, wife of Andrew McCall, a farmer and extensive land owner in Rock Island County, Ill., who has three children; Agnes, residing with her parents; Thomas, a resident of Galesville; John, living on an adjoining farm, who married Effie Bidwell, and has two children; Ellen, wife of Henry Shoffell, a farmer in Nebraska; Ruth, wife of Fred Docken, a farmer and ranchman in Montana; Mae, residing with her parents; Jennie, wife of Talmadge Vicery, a lumber dealer in Sheridan, Wyoming; Isabelle, residing at home, and Robert, who is operating the home farm.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 364 - 365

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Walter Hunter, a well-known farmer in section 35, Gale Township, was born on his parents' farm at Decorah Prairie, this township, Aug. 12, 1863.  His parents were Thomas and Agnes (Grant) Hunter.  He was educated in the district school and remained at home until he was 20 years old.  He then went to Cheyenne, Wyo., under contract and for one summer was employed in cutting wood for the soldiers at old Fort Laramie.  He then went to southwestern Nebraska, where he homesteaded Government land, residing there until the spring of 1902, and during this time being engaged in farming and stock raising on a tract of 320 acres, which he sold in 1906, four years after his return home.  In 1902 he purchased his present farm of 120 acres of valley land, which adjoins his father's farm in section 35, and here he has since carried on general farming, devoting his entire time to the business.  He is also a stockholder in the La Crosse Packing Company and in the Independent Harvester Company in Plano, Ill.  Mr. Hunter was married April 28, 1892, to Jeanette Oliver, daughter of Robert and Mary (Scott) Oliver.  Her parents, who were natives of Lanarkshire, Scotland, were early settlers in Trempealeau County, Mr. Oliver becoming an extensive land owner here.  Mr. and Mrs. Hunter have a family of eight children: John, Lucian, William, Agnes, Mamie, Ollie, Norman and Donald, all of whom reside at home.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 577

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William Hunter, an early settler, was born in Clackmannanshire, Scotland, and as a young man became a miner.  He married Jane Neish, and in 1852, after three children had been born, set out for America.  His wife died shortly after his arrival in the new country.  Locating near Pittsburg, Penn., he followed his former occupation as a miner for eighteen years.  He was determined, however, to see other environment for is family, so in 1870, he came west and secured a homestead of 160 acres in section 5, Burnside Township, this county.  Here he successfully farmed until his death, in 1897.  He was the father of six children:  William, who lives with his brother James N. on the home farm; Janet, wife of D. A. Hunt, of Burnside Township; James N., who owns and operates the old homestead; Annie, now Mrs. Cole, of South Dakota; Kate, the wife of Charles Hoyt, of Spokane, Wash., and Mary, wife of Fred Martin, of Trempealeau.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 613

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Emil Huslegard, a well known farmer of Chimney Rock Township, proprietor of the Huslegard farm of 160 acres in section 33, and also the owner of 35 acres in section 4, Burnside Township, the whole forming one farm, was born in Soler, Norway, June 4, 1858, a son of Ole and Ellen, his wife, whose maiden name was Ellen Ansett. The father was born in Norway in 1829 and was married in his native land, where his wife died in 1869. In 1871 he came with the surviving members of his family to the United States, settling in Adams County, Wis., where he remained five years. He then bought 80 acres of land in section 33, Chimney Rock Township, which he cultivated for four years, subsequently retiring and taking up his residence with his son Emil, at whose home he died in June, 1897. By his wife Ellen he had seven children: Lottie, who married Carl Hendrickson, a farmer of Chimney Rock Township; Halvor, who resides with his brother Emil, who was the third born child; Helen, who married Adolph Melsness, who is secretary of the I. S. W. A. at Eau Claire, Wis.; Bertha, wife of Charles Johnson, a moulder of Eau Claire, Wis.; Mary, wife of Adolph Hendrickson, a farmer of Chimney Rock Township; Alice, who died at the age of 20 years. Emil Huslegard was a boy of 13 years when he accompanied his father to America. At that early age he made himself useful in various ways and when a little older and stronger began working in the saw mills at Necedah, Wis., being thus occupied subsequently, and also working in the woods, until 1889. He then bought the farm on which he has since resided and which he is operating on a profitable basis. This is a well developed piece of agricultural property, with good buildings, and is pleasantly situated in the southern part of the township in the neighborhood known as Russell.

Jan. 17, 1892, Mr. Huslegard was married to Laura Haakenson, who was born in Chimney Rock Township, this county, Jan. 17, 1871. Her father, John Haakenson, who was born in Norway in 1846, came to America in 1868, and died Dec. 4, 1891. Her mother, whose maiden name was Ellen Erickson, was born in Norway, March 11, 1832, and is still residing on the old homestead in Chimney Rock Township. Mr. and Mrs. Huslegard are the parents of three children: John, born April 26, 1893; Alice, born Jan. 29, 1895, and Henry, born Jan. 12, 1898. The family attend the Norwegian Lutheran Church.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 635 - 636

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Byron L. Hutchins, who is engaged in the real estate business at Independence, Wis., was born in Burnside Township, Trempealeau County, Wis., Sept. 22, 1865, son of James L. and Elizabeth (Tubbs) Hutchins. The father, James, took a homestead in this county about 1860, and died in 1876 at the age of 37 years. His widow resides in Independence at the age of 72 years. Byron L. Hutchins was reared in Independence and for a number of years after his father's death was occupied in the management of his mother's business affairs. In 1900 he engaged in the real estate business in Independence and has since continued in it, handling city and farm property and rentals. He has been a member of the village council eight years and is a stockholder in the State Bank of Independence. In the order of the Knights of Pythias he has passed all the chairs. Mr. Hutchins was married in February, 1899, to Bertha Arnold, of Arcadia Township, this county. Her father, William D. Arnold, who was a pioneer farmer here, is now living retired at the age of 85 years in Winona, Minn.; his wife, Mrs. Hutchins' mother, is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Hutchins have two children: Lee J., aged 16 years, and Earl B., aged 10 years.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," page 642

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William G. Hyslop, proprietor of the Blair Flour Mills, has been one of the most prominent mill and creamery men in this part of the state. He was born at Osseo, in this county, Feb. 26, 1864, the son of Ebenezer and Anna (Gillespie) Hyslop. Ebenezer Hyslop, a retired carpenter, now living in Osseo, at the age of 88 years, was born in Scotland, came to America in 1850, lived two years in New York City, and four years in Richland County, Wisconsin, and in 1859 came to Osseo, this county, where he has since resided, his wife, whom he married in 1850 having died in 1899, at the age of 69 years. William G. Hyslop was reared in Osseo, and there received his education. For 25 years he devoted his time to the creamery business, having at one period no less than five establishments under his management. He learned his trade at Osseo; he was manager of the creameries at Ettrick and Blair; he built the creamery at Alma Center, and he purchased the creameries at Melrose and Neillsville. In 1901 he bought his present mill, and operated it in connection with his management of the Blair creamery. In 1909 he rented the mill and took up farming at Bowman, N. D. In February, 1916, he again resumed charge of the mill. A prominent man in the community, he has been on the village council for many terms, ten years of which he was its president. He also served on year as a member of the county board of supervisors. His fraternal associations are with the Masonic order, the Modern Woodmen and the Beavers. Mr. Hyslop was married Oct. 22, 1877, to Ella Quinn, born in Ettrick, April 26, 1864, daughter of James and Susan Quinn, the former of whom died in 1912 at the age of 91, and the latter in 1899 at the age of 69 years. Mr. and Mrs. Hyslop have five children: Clayton, Orton, Leland, Faye and Virda, the three last mentioned residing at home. Clayton and Orton were graduated from the Northwestern Medical School, then performed interne service in Mercy Hospital, Chicago, and are both now practicing physicians, located in that city.

-Transcribed from the "History of Trempealeau County Wisconsin, 1917," pages 556 - 557


 


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