corner header home search engine what's new
sidebar USGenWeb Project photos tools histories databases archives about us WIGenWeb Project
Histories:  Trempealeau Co. Historical Accounts:

"Trempealeau County" by Clarence J. Gamroth:

Volume 1B:

Biographical Data:  
Surnames H through M:

The following information was gathered from various sources - mostly newspapers.  Many of these biographical items are obituaries.  This data was compiled in 1975 and includes biographical data on the following people:

HALAMA, Carl
HUTCHINS, James L
JELEN, Kate
JOHANSON, Johan A.
KILLIAN, Clements
KLIMEK, Philip
KULIG, Dr. A. H.
KULIG, Hyacinth
KULIG, Jacob and Mary
KULIG, Lucy
KULIG, Mary (nee SKROCH)
LAMBERT, Benjamin
LARSON, O. P.
LINTZ, G. L.
MARKHAM, Ada
MARKHAM, George
MAULE, George Frederick
MAULE, Walter
MULLIGAN, Michael



HALAMA, Carl

The following article was printed in the Independence News Wave on 06 Jun 1936:

60th Wedding Anniversary is Celebrated

Last Saturday, May 30, marked the 60th wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Halama who reside two miles north of this village.

Carl Halama was born in Poppeleau, Germany, November 2, 1853 and came to America in 1870 settling in New City (about a mile west of Independence).

Mrs. Halama, nee Mary Sonsalla, was born in Siolkowic (Schalkwietz) November 9, 1858 and came to America with her parents in 1868 settling in North Creek (east of Arcadia).

The couple were married on May 30, 1876 in North Creek church and for the past number of years have resided on the farm north of Independence (now owned by John Halama - CJG).

Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Halama, all of whom are living except Lucy, who died in 1918.  The surviving children are:  Julia (Mrs John Dejno), Frances (Mrs. Julius Sylla), Anastasia (Mrs. John Pampuch), Bridget (Mrs. August Gasates), Stanley (wife - Julia Smieja), Bert (wife - Helen Knusalla), Jake (wife - Julia Filla), Sister Theabalda at Cleveland, Ohio, Teckla (Mrs. Paul Schwakka of Avon, Minn.) Elizabeth, and Agnes (one of these was Mrs. John Smieja of Bowler, Minn.)  There are also 17 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

+++

HUTCHINS, James L.

Born in Mississippi on May 1, 1839.  Married Elizabeth Tubbs, March 25, 1861 in Jackson County, Wis.  Moved to Hixton, Wisconsin and farmed until 1865, then came to Town of Burnside, Trempealeau County where they farmed until his death in 1876.  Was member of Town Board of Burnside.  There were five children; Mary L., Byron L., Sylvester, Otis, and Lorenzo.

(Transcriber's note - this biographical material was copied in part from the book "History of Northern Wisconsin" which was published in 1881 by the Western Historical Society, Chicago.  For an exact transcription of this biography, including references to page numbers, etc., 
go to here)

+++

JOHANSON, Johan A.

Dealer in groceries and general merchandise, Independence.  Born in Norway, June 8, 1845 where he lived until 1872 teaching school the last 7 years.  Came to America in 1872, landing in La Crosse, Wisconsin where he engaged in lumbering and farming for 3 years.  In 1875, went to Trempealeau County where he worked on a farm for 1 year and then came to Independence.  First clerked for Lambert and Larson, merchants.  In 1879 became partner with Larson.  After 2 years, sold out.  Started own store in February, 1881.  On June 8, 1878, married Olive Severson.  One son (as of 1881), Joel Marius.  Member of Lutheran Church.

(Transcriber's note - this biographical material was copied in part from the book "History of Northern Wisconsin" which was published in 1881 by the Western Historical Society, Chicago.  For an exact transcription of this biography, including references to page numbers, etc., 
go to here)

+++

JELEN, Kate

The following article was printed in the Independence News Wave on 14 Nov 1903:

Kate Jelen Suicides

We take the following from the La Crosse Chronicle:

"Don't blame nobody for what I've done"

The above words written on a piece of cheap paper, found pinned to a shawl on the docks of the spear skiff ferry below the wagon bridge early Thrusday morning are the only clue to throw light upon the mysterious disappearance of Miss Kate Jelen of Independence, a pretty 19 year old domestic who has been employed in the home of Joseph Abel family of Winnebago Street.

The girl disappeared last Wednesday and indicaitons point to suicide by drowning.  It is believed she took the fatal leap from the skiff ferry sometime during the night.

Miss Jelen came here from Independence about 18 months ago, and entered the employ of Mr. Jos. Abel, whose wife and children soon formed a strong attachment for the girl.  She was treated as one of the family.

Several months ago, Miss Jelen became acquainted with Steven Smith, who worked on the new chapel of St. Rose convent.  The two became very much attached to each other, and it was believed that they were engaged.  Tuesday of last week, Mr. Smith went to Dunham, Mich., where he had secured employment.  He was to return in the spring to marry the girl.

When seen by a Chronicle representative last evening, Mrs. Abel said, "I hardly know what to think of the matter.  Miss Jelen has been living with us for over a year and she was a good worker and a nice girl.  We got along real well and had perfect confidence in the girl.  She never whent out much."

"Wednesday evening we were together as usual and Kate seemed in her usual happy spirits.  She went out later but returned quite early.  Before going to her room, she took her hair ornaments and combs and placed them on the table downstairs together with a letter she had received from her lover in Michigan.  That was the last seen of her alive.  We knew nothing of her actions until morning when the family came down for breakfast and found she was missing.

Sometime ago Katie had told A. Leudtke that she would drown herself, but we paid no attention to the threat at that time, as we did not then understand the reason for it.  She borrowed a lead pencil from my husband in the evening on which she disappeared, and we have never seen it since.  She no doubt wrote the farewell note with it.  A fact which indicates premedication.  I recognized the shawl when brought her by the police."

Deceased has a sister in the convent at Fort Atkinson, Iowa, also a sister at Independence, Mrs. Maciocek, together with five brothers, Peter, Paul, John, Frank and Thomas.

Her father and a step-mother also live in Independence.  Deceased was 19 years, 7 months and 14 days of age and left home because of strained relationship between herself and step-mother with whom she could not agree.  She had made many friends in the city and was well liked.

The body was recovered Saturday morning at 9 o'clock.  John Jelen went to La Crosse last Saturday evening and returned Monday morning with the remains accompanied by Mr. Abel. The funeral was held from the train.

Miss Jelen was thought much of.  The brothers and sisters have the sympathy of all.

She was last her on 19th of February.

+++

KILLIAN, Clements

The following article was printed in the Independence News Wave on 21 Sep 1934:

The News Wave of the above date mentions that Clements Killian, his brother and John Sygulla, and John Susa had settled in Trempealeau County, Wisconsin.  John Susa had served in the Prussian army and took part in the Prussian Danish war in 1864 and in the Prussian-Austrian War in 1866.  Clements died in 1912.

(Comment by Clarence J. Gamroth: The above men were born in Poppeleau and the Schalkowietz area of upper Silesia, Prussia.  Clements Killian was the uncle of my grandmother, Mrs. George (Susanna) Maciocek.  She was the mother of my mother, Agnes.)

+++

KLIMEK, Philip

The following article was printed in the Independence News Wave on 08 Jun 1923:

Golden Wedding Anniversary was Celebrated by Mr. and Mrs. Philip Klimek

He was born in Poppeleau Germany May 1, 1842.  He served in the German army for 2 years from 1866.

Prior to entry in the army, he was married to mary Pietrek in 1862.  Two children were born to them, Philip and John.

He and his family came to America in 1870.  They came by railroad as far as La Crosse, thence by boat to Trempealeau.  From there he set out by foot so that he might find desireable land to homestead.  He first located in Wickham Valley, filing on 160 acres, between Independence and Arcadia.

Three years later his wife died.  In 1873, he married Mary Kampa.  Four children were born to this union; Mary, Jacob, Joe and Anna.

For a time Philip Klimek worked on the farm of George H. Markham at $15.00 per month, a big wage then.

After a number of years of hard work, he purchased an additional 80 acres making his farm a 240 acre tract, now owned by his son, Philip Jr.  A few years later he bought the old Andrew Wickham farm of 160 acres, now owned by his son John.  Later he bought the Henry Hotman place of 192 acres which is now owned by Joe Klimek.  He then bought the 170 acres Crane farm which is now owned by Jacob Klimek.  At one time, Philip Klimek Sr. owned 762 acres of Trempealeau County land. 

In 1901, Mr. and Mrs. Klimek retired farming and moved to Independence.  Mr. Klimek is 81 years old and his wife is 84.

(Comment by Clarence J. Gamroth - In Independence, the Klimek home stood just a few feet south of the present home of August Mish, his son-in-law.  Klimek's house was originally a rectory for the priest of SS Peter and Paul congregation.  The frame rectory stood west of Hwy. 93 almost opposite the church.  From it a broad view was had of the Elk Creek to the west, and a view of the village to the south.  When a brick parsonage was erected east of the Hwy. 93, the frame house became the house of the nuns teaching in the parochial school.  Eventually the house was sold to Philip Klimek who moved it down the hill to use it as his home.  This was, as stated above, just south of the present August Mish house.  Eventually the old frame parsonage which became a sister's house, was moved again about 75 to 100 feet further south.  it is now occupied by Joe Jaszewski.

Philip Klimek, after his retirement from the farm, served as janitor in the Catholic Church.

In the news article, it was stated that Mr. Klimek served 2 years in the German army.  He told me that he was in combat but although he was forced to fire at the enemy, he did not want to kill anybody.  Surreptitiously, he buried some of the bullets under him while lying prone facing the enemy.  I believe that it was during the war between Prussia (Germany) and Austria.

August Mish, son-in-law of Philip Klimek Sr., said that Philip died February 26, 1925. 

First wife, Mary Pietrek, died ___ 18, 1873
Second wife, Mary Kampa, died Dec. 1924.)

Additional information -
According to SS Peter and Paul Church death records Philip Klimek died February 20, 1925 (#983), Mary Kampa Klimek died January 4, 1924 (#956).

+++

KULIG, Dr. A. H.

The following article was printed in the Independence News Wave, date unknown:

Dr. A. H. Kulig has opened up an office in rooms over Max & Isaacs' store for the practice of medicine.  Dr. Kulig is no stranger to our people as he was born only a few miles from Independence and grew to manhood here.

He graduated from Marquette in 1910 and then entered the hospital at Duluth where he practiced for more than a year, later going to Dodge, Wis. where he practiced until August 1917 when he enlisted in the Army.

He sailed for France in July, 1918 and served as a member of the medical department of the air service.  He arrived back in the States in June of that year and after a good rest has decided to practice here.

+++

KULIG, Hyacinth

Source - Clarence J. Gamroth

Mr. and Mrs. Hyacinth Kulig lived across the street (Hwy. 93, Osseo Rd.) from our house.  They lived in the house now (1971) occupied by their grandson attorney Edward J. Kulig.  I knew the Kulig's very well.  We children would fish on their land which was adjacent to the Pond (Bugle Lake).  We wee never hindered by the Kulig's in playing n their land.  The water was a great attraction to us.

+++

KULIG, Jacob and Mary

Source - Independence News Wave, 19 Feb 1932

On February 2, 1932, Mr. and Mrs. Kulig celebrated their 58th wedding anniversary.

On July 22, 1853, Mr. Kulig was born in Shalkowitz, Upper Silesia Prussia, Germany.  In 1868, with brother Hyaith (sp?) and sister Agatha started for the United States.

Many new and strange experiences were felt by this boy of 15 in the trip to Hamburg, thence to Quebec, then by rail to Chicago, thence to La Crosse by rail and up the Mississippi by boat to Trempealeau.  (No railroad as yet ran between La Crosse and Trempealeau).

Jacob lived with his sister at North Creek, near Arcadia, for the first few years, learning the new methods and broadening his experience to meet the many hardships that tested the mettle of the pioneers in this country.  Arcadia consisted of a general store and a mill, and Independence was located at New City and was merely a cross road junction.

He worked for various farmers and at 20 gathered enough money to homestead a farm in Maule Coulee.

About two weeks before Jacob Kulig started to America in 1868, another party left from Poppeleau, a town 4 miles from Shalkowitz and came through New York to Trempealeau.  In this party was a little girl of 10, Mary Skroch, who was born in Poppeleau, September 2, 1858.  She lived in Trempealeau with relatives.  In February 1874, she married Jacob Kulig and went with him to Maule Coulee.  The surviving children are Louis, Joseph, Agatha, William, simon and Bob.

+++

KULIG, Mrs. Jacob (Mary) nee SKROCH

Source - Independence News Wave, 19 Aug 1932

Mrs. Jacob Kulig (Mary Skroch) was born in Poppeleau, Upper Silesia, Prussia Germany on Sept. 2, 1858.  She died August 13, 1932, at age 73. 

In 1886, at age 10, came to the United States with her parents, Matt and Annie Skroch.  They settled in Maule Coulee, east of Independence.  On February 3, 1874 was married to Jacob Kulig.  Eleven children were born to this union.  Her husband, aged 79, survives.  Peter and Frank Skroch, brothers, Charles Sylla, half brother and Kate (Mrs. Joe Thiring) and Susan (Mrs. Fred Maule), half sisters, survive.

+++

KULIG, Lucy

Source - Independence News Wave, 23 Feb 1961

Mrs. Lucy Kulig, 92, died Thursday at the Whitehall Community Hospital where she had been a patient for a year after breaking a hip.

She was born in Poppeleau, Germany, December 1868 and came to this country with her parents at age 14.  Her first husband, Frank Marsolek, died in 1901.  She married Peter Kulig in 1904 and he died in 1909.

Survivors are two daughters; Sophia (Mrs. George Kulig) and Victoria (Mrs. Joe Sonsalla) and one son, Valentine, by her first marriage.  One daughter, Monica Kulig, St. Paul by her second marriage.  Joseph Smieja, Bowlus, Minnesota, also survives.

(Comment by Clarence Gamroth - Lucy Kulig for many years was a neighbor of ours.  She was a wonderful woman.  I always liked to hear what she said about conditions in her native Poppeleau Upper Silesia, Prussia.

The school master was a harsh teacher.  Although he was of Polish extraction, he was an offical of the German government.  He insisted that they talk German, even in their homes.  He did not spare the rod for any infractions.  She came to this country and this area being more or less wilderness, living conditions were difficult.  Heavy work was the lot of all the people.

When married the first time, she and husband settled on a farm with little cleared land.  Therefore she helped with the chopping of trees and brush and digging stumps.  She said this was extremely hard work and besides there were chores to do, keep house and raise children.  In spite of her difficult life, she attained the age of 92 and outlived two husbands and at least two children.  A remarkable life.)

+++

LAMBERT, Benjamin

Born September 2, 1827, Lancaster, Penn.

Lived in Philadelphia for 25 years engaged in carting and shipping business.

Married there on August 28, 1857 to Phebe A. Axe, his wife having been born in the same house and room that he was on May 31, 1839.

Three children born in Philadephia:  Margaret, Philip M., and William L., also one adopted daughter, Elizabeth.

The Lambert family came to Independence, April 12, 1878.

(Transcriber's note - this biographical material was copied in part from the book "History of Northern Wisconsin" which was published in 1881 by the Western Historical Society, Chicago.  For an exact transcription of this biography, including references to page numbers, etc., 
go to here)

+++

LARSON, O. P.

As of 1881.

Born April 15, 1849 in Norway.

Came to America in 1865 where he remained one year clerking in a mercantile store at Black Earth, Dane County, Wisconsin.

Went back to Norway until 1872 when he returned to America and clerked for Getts and Company at Whitehall, Wisconsin until 1876.

Came to Independence in 1876 and started a store.  It was the first general merchandise in the village.  In 1878 married Lena Waller, a native of Norway.  In 1880 went back to their native Norway for a six month visit.

(Transcriber's note - this biographical material was copied in part from the book "History of Northern Wisconsin" which was published in 1881 by the Western Historical Society, Chicago.  For an exact transcription of this biography, including references to page numbers, etc., 
go to here)

+++

LINTZ, G. L.

As of 1881.

Proprietor of International Hotel and Billiard Hall.

Born in New York in 1831, and left therein 1874 and came to Wisconsin.

In 1877 settled in Independence.

Opened what was then known as Farmer Home Hotel where he continued until January 1881 when he began present business.  In 1863 enlisted in 18th New York Calvary Company L and served until the close of the war (Civil War) in the army of the Potomac.

(Transcriber's note - this biographical material was copied in part from the book "History of Northern Wisconsin" which was published in 1881 by the Western Historical Society, Chicago.  For an exact transcription of this biography, including references to page numbers, etc., 
go to here)

+++

MARKHAM, Ada

Source - Independence News Wave, 30 Dec 1948.

Mrs. James F. Williams of Madison, better known here as Ada K. Markham, passed away at her home in Madison on Tuesday of last week after a long illness.  In fact, she had been in ill health for the past 3 years.

Deceased was born Ada Rogers, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Rogers, on Dec. 26, 1867, and had the age of almost 81 years at the time of death.

On October 11, 1891, she was united in marriage to George Markham who passed away July 16, 1909.  Upon his death, she took over publication of the News Wave which she and her husband had been operating since 1891.  She continued as publisher of the News Wave until october 1920 when she sold the business to G. L. Kirkpatrick, present publisher.

In 1924, she was united in marriage to James F. Williams and Madison had been their home ever since.

Funeral services took place in Madison Friday of last week.

+++

MARKHAM, George

As of 1881.

Farmer, sec. 24, P. o. Independence, Wisconsin.

Born in Yorkshire, England January 24, 1837.

Came with parents to America and purchased a farm from the Government in Trempealeau County, Wisconsin in 1856.  It consisted of 120 acres but he has since then increased the farm to 720 acres.  His father, John Markham, was a Captain with the British Navy for sixty years.

George H. Markham was in Trempealeau Valley at the time of the Indian scare, but he was not a man to run.  He poured a keg of powder to protect himself. (see comment below)

Was elected to State Assembly from Trempealeau County in 1879.  Also held offices in the town.

On October 8, 1862 married Fannie Bishop of Portage, Wis.  She was born August 11, 1841.

(Comment by Clarence J. Gamroth - The Indian scare was a result of a Sioux Indian uprising in Minnesota in 1862.  Rumors spread that all Indians were on a warpath.  All rumors proved groundless.  Many lives were lost on both sides of the conflict.)

(Transcriber's note - this biographical material was copied in part from the book "History of Northern Wisconsin" which was published in 1881 by the Western Historical Society, Chicago.  For an exact transcription of this biography, including references to page numbers, etc., go to here)

+++

MAULE, George Frederick

Source - Independence News Wave, 14 Nov 1924.

One by one the old settlers are thinnning out, leaving history behind them.  The following article was written by John A. Markham:

George Frederick Maule, one of the very few remaining pioneers of Trempealeau County died November 8, 1924.  He was the son of the Rev. Henry Augustus Maule who was a clergyman of the church of England.  At the time George Maule came to America, the Reverend Maule was pastor of Raverly, England where the Maule's had a family estate.  There are seven brothers and sisters.  One of the brothers, Walter R. Maule, came to America with the Markham family in 1856.  He died here July 21, 1898.

George Maule was born on October 25, 1846 and at the time of his death was 78 years old.

On June 5, 1871, he married Pauline Nogosek, a Polish girl, at the Catholic church rectory in Pine Creek, Trempealeau County, Wisconsin.  Seven children were born to this union; Frederick, John, and Ignatz, living on farms in this area; Kate Kern of Ledgewood, North Dakota, Pauline Dembicki, Detroit, Michigan, August Maule at Royalton, Minnesota, and Helen Breska.

Funeral was held at SS Peter and Paul Church Independence, on November 12, Father Kufel officiating.  In the last years of his life, Mr. Maule was greatly crippled because of rheumatism and had to use walking sticks to get along.

(Comments from Clarence J. Gamroth - Pauline Nogosek was the daughter of Barbara Gamroth Nogosek, wife of Valentine Nogosek.  Another daughter, Elizabeth married Kasper Manka whose son John married Frances Sluga, first cousin of my mother, Agnes Maciosek Gamroth.  Barbara Gamroth Nogosek was the sister of Frank Gamroth whose son Robert was my father.  Pauline and Elizabeth and their brother John Nogosek came from Poppeleau, Upper Silesia, Prussia.  The parents, Valentine and Barbara Gamroth Nogosek did not emigrate to the United States.

The original marriage certificate of George Frederick Maule and Pauline Nogosek gives Elk Creek, Trempealeau Co. as his residence.  The place where the marriage was contracted was given as Pine Creek on the 5th day of June in a Protestant ceremony.  The foregoing marriage was consummated by Fr. Jos ______ on the 17th day of June in Pine Creek.)

+++

MAULE, Walter

Source - Independence News Wave, 16 Jul 1898

Walter Maule, an old resident of this vicinity was found dead in bed Saturday morning.  An inquest determined that cause of death was heart disease.  Funeral was held Monday from the Methodist Church, Rev. Philpost officiating.  Mr. Maule was born in England about 58 years ago and came to this country in 1856.  He never married.

(Comment by Clarence J. Gamroth - The Walter Maule obituary mentions nothing about his coming to America with Captain John Markham and family.  Walter Maule, George H. Markham, Mr. Davis and Mr. Lyne came to town of Burnside, Trempealeau County ahead of the other Markhams.  The known party erected a crude log house in 1856 on the Markham farm.  They survived the harsh winter with meager supplies of food.  After a few years Mr. Maule bought his own farm about a mile east of the Markham place.  Maule Coulee is named after him.)

+++

MULLIGAN, Michael

As of 1881.

County judge of Trempealeau County.

Born in Ireland, Westmeath County, July 9, 1845.

Came to America with his parents when only 2 years old and settled on a farm in Connecticut in town of Rockville.

In 1865, Michael came west and lived in Black River Falls, Jackson County, Wisconsin for two years, engaged with W. T. Price on a farm.

Then moved to Durand, Pepin County.  Was in Eau Claire for three years teaching school and working part time in a mill.

Attended Galesville University at odd times from Fall 1869, and his last in Fall of 1874.  Went into law office of G. L. Freeman and was admitted to the bar in 1876.  He was in partnership with Freeman for one year.  In 1877 opened his own office in Galesville.  In May 1878, he moved to Independence.  In the Fall of 1878 he was elected District Attorney of Trempealeau for two years.  In April 1881 was elected judge of Trempealeau  County for four years.  Commencing with Jan. 1, 1882 but owing to the resignation of Seth Mills, was appointed to fill the vacancy from May 28 to Jan. 1, 1882.  Judge Mulligans' is a member of AFTAM order at Arcadia Lodge #201 and AOUW Independence.

(Transcriber's note - this biographical material was copied in part from the book "History of Northern Wisconsin" which was published in 1881 by the Western Historical Society, Chicago.  For an exact transcription of this biography, including references to page numbers, etc., go to here.)

 


f-trempealeau
The WIGenWeb Project logo was designed and provided by Debbie Barrett.

DISCLAIMER:   No claim is made to the copyrights of the individual submitters.   The contents of this website may be used for personal use only by individuals researching their own ancestry.   Commercial use of this information for profit is strictly prohibited without prior permission of the owners.  Other genealogical websites may link to this website; however, permission is not granted to duplicate any of the contents.  Anyone contributing material for posting does so in recognition of its free, non-commercial distribution, as well as the responsibility  to assure that no copyright is violated by the submission.  This website and its coordinator are not responsible for donations of copyrighted material where explicit written permission has not been granted for use.
____________________________________________________________
Copyright © 2000 - 2012
All Rights Reserved
wigenwebcc
This website was established on 31 Oct 2000